#1
Hi,

I have a really nice Baden acoustic guitar that is very nicely set up. Intonation's great. The only problem is, I have slight fret buzz. I need to raise my strings just a little bit. Currently, string height at the 12th fret is 3.5/32". I am absolutely paranoid about causing harm to this guitar, but I think I need to tweak the truss rod a bit. I'm broke, so I don't feel like paying someone $50 to turn a wrench for me.

What are your thoughts?

Thanks!
#5
Yes, it is fret buzz. I would have to check, but from memory, I have three problem areas.


Low E string
High E string on 7th fret when capo on 4th fret
G string 9th fret with no capo

The action is near ideal. It just is a little bit to close, so it hits some frets.
#6
You would want to loosen your truss rod a little so that the strings can pull more of an up-bow into the neck. This will result in an increase in neck relief, allowing the strings more room to vibrate freely. Tightening the truss would have the opposite effect, causing the neck to flatten out or if already flat it could go into a back-bow state, making the guitar nearly unplayable. I suggest a 1/4 counter-clockwise turn of the truss and go from there. Play the guitar as you normally would and gauge the effect.
#7
I just read your link romingbard, and it looks like, based on where my guitar buzzes, I actually need to raise the bridge? I guess truss rod adjustment is only if low fretted notes buzz, but if high frets buzz too, a bridge raise is necessary. Does that sound right?

And ya, tightening instead of loosening was just me not thinking. Thanks for pointing it out.
#8
Quote by jakeman1086
I just read your link romingbard, and it looks like, based on where my guitar buzzes, I actually need to raise the bridge? I guess truss rod adjustment is only if low fretted notes buzz, but if high frets buzz too, a bridge raise is necessary. Does that sound right?

And ya, tightening instead of loosening was just me not thinking. Thanks for pointing it out.


The realm of influence that the truss has on the neck is from the nut to the point on the neck where it joins the body, typically the 14th fret, some are at the 12th fret. The most travel will be at the mid-point between these two places, so either the 7th or 6th respectively. The effect lessens as you radiate out from these two center points. If you say you have a buzzing happening at the 7th and 9th frets, then I would first attempt a small truss adjustment before raising the action at the saddle. You already like the action where it is, so why mess with it? You can always reverse the truss adjustment if it doesn't give you the desired results. If you want to raise the saddle, you can shim it, which is also reversible. Lowering the saddle isn't reversible unless you either shim it or replace it with a taller one. On the nut end of the neck, you can tweak the action lower by filing the nut slots deeper. If you needed to raise the action there, then you should replace the nut, but it could be shimmed. I'm not a fan of shimming either the saddle or nut as it can rob some tone and sustain from the guitar, especially at the saddle.
#9
Wow, thanks lefty. That was a very helpful post. And I guess, if the truss rod adjustment doesn't work, the next best thing would be to actually buy a new, taller saddle or nut (and have it professionally installed), as anything else would rob tone?
#10
the truss rod shouldn't be used to adjust the action. that's not what it's for - it's there for neck relief. buying a new saddle and nut and making them a tiny tiny bit higher than the existing ones when you adjust them is the way to go. or you could perhaps shim them up just a little, which might be easier and even cheaper. and that way, if you find the action is too high, you still have the original nut and saddle right there.
#11
or you could shim the nut and saddle.
FS LTD EC-50 with GFS PowerRails Bridge pickup
#12
Quote by patticake
the truss rod shouldn't be used to adjust the action.

True, but for the threadstarter's case it would be a hell of a lot easier than bothering with a whole new saddle. As long as it's a really small adjustment, a little loosening will do just fine.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Sep 3, 2009,