#1
I've been playing guitar for a little over a year and I still have not learned to notes on the fretboard.

I can't just pick a fret, a string and say that a {insert note}. I can figure it out but it takes a minute or two.

I want to know if their is a certian way to do this.
#2
I've been playing for 2 years, and I can only remember the notes of the bottom two strings. From there, I use the octave trick- up 2 strings and 2 frets, and you have the same note

for example, 5th fret on the low E string is an A. Up 2 strings and 2 frets, 7th fret on the D string will also be an A.

This changes to 3 frets when dealing with the D and G strings, and the top E is of course the same as the bottom E. I HOPE that helps..
#3
Quote by Blckspawn
I've been playing guitar for a little over a year and I still have not learned to notes on the fretboard.

I can't just pick a fret, a string and say that a {insert note}. I can figure it out but it takes a minute or two.

I want to know if their is a certian way to do this.


years of experience. Learning to read in all positions is a good way to truly know the fretboard.

Unless your talking about a general/fuzzy overview......it takes time, more than a year.
shred is gaudy music
#4
Teach yourself the basic patterns.

Start with Octaves and 5ths. They are easy.

The 5th is 2 frets ups on the next string down or working the opposite way it is the same fret 1 string up. (3 frets up between 2nd and 3rd)

Then learn where a 3rd is, then minor 3rd.

These patterns will allow you to figure any interval.

As for actual note names, this is not all that useful, but if you learn the 5th and 6th string you can use the intervals to figure the rest.
#5
I would argue that knowing actual note names is rather important and useful.

Please tell me how you know what key you are in?

"Oh, I'm in Major 3rd, Perfect 5th, Minor 6th, Major 7th?"




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#7
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
I would argue that knowing actual note names is rather important and useful.

Please tell me how you know what key you are in?

"Oh, I'm in Major 3rd, Perfect 5th, Minor 6th, Major 7th?"


um if you know your intervals then you should know what note that particular interval is to begin with or you can at least figure it out. its not difficult

Edit: didnt realize TS didnt know the notes on the fretboard haha. well just learn that first thats not difficult either
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#9
Put your metronome on playing... umm... say 50bpm. Then play C from 1st string, then from 2nd string, then 3rd string and so on. One note with per beat. Once you have done that perfectly, do the same with D, then E, then F... and so on.

After you have played all of those perfectly, boost up the metronome to... 60bpm, or if you're feeling lucky, to 70 bpm. Then start all over again. You'll get it right, eventually. The faster you can do this, the better you have it down.

Visualizing, of course, is the base of all learning... so, before you start playing, try to visualize the note C from each of the strings. Not one by one, but all at once.
#11
i find learning where they are by finding a C on each string is rather counter productive to me - i just start noticing patterns and working with them rather than actually learning anything. Might work for you though. I know most notes by intervals it comes more naturally to me to say 11th fret D string is a major 6th in E than saying it's a Db/C# it makes more musical sense too because i know how it sounds, not just it's name. kinda handy when lacking perfect pitch.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#12
Quote by Dragonis
um if you know your intervals then you should know what note that particular interval is to begin with or you can at least figure it out. its not difficult

Edit: didnt realize TS didnt know the notes on the fretboard haha. well just learn that first thats not difficult either


It's ok, but at least you saw my point.

I know a Major 2nd is a whole step away, does it mean I need to know the note to know it's Major 2nd?

Not at all.

:/




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#13
In my opinion, the best way to learn the fret board is to learn how to read sheet music. So, why don't you practice to sigh-read. And that's two bonuses.

'Berklee's medern method' will take you there with a bit of patience and a decent amount of work.
#15
Yes, I found it helpful to know where all the notes are at on the fretboard.

Put stickers with the names of the natural notes on your broard.
Learn everything in the key of C ( only the white keys on a keyboard)
Evidently the sharp or flat notes are in between.

Call out the notes as you play them. Slowly...No need to go fast.
Allow you brain to make a mental and visual note of it.
With in 21 days your brain will absorb it , if you slowly allow you brain to
identify the notes.

You can also make a print out sheet of the freat board.
Fill in out the sheets a couple times a day.
Do it for at least a month. It will go into your long term memory bank.

Break it down into sections.

Bar your index figer at the 7th fret.
It's bascailly almost the same as open position. (just one octive higher)
The open E on the low E string. The higher octive E is at A sting 7th fret.
You'll get familar with the B string notes after a while.

Everything repeat itself at the 12 fret.

The E strings are the same. Which leaves you with only 5 strings

After a while you'll be able to play in whatever posistion
#16
These 2 options seem sensible:

1) Name the notes as you play them
2) Read sheet music

#1 is probably frustrating and boring. #2 less so.
#17
Quote by Eastwinn
These 2 options seem sensible:

1) Name the notes as you play them
2) Read sheet music

#1 is probably frustrating and boring. #2 less so.

Yeah, I guess my solution resembles numer 1, but even while learning from tabs, dont just mindless play the numbers it indicates, instead when you finger a chord, figure out the name of the chord, and when you play a solo make sure you name every note in the slo as you learn it. This will not only help you memorize the fretboard, but it will maybe help you understand whats going on in the music your playing.
#18
Learn the notes from the open note up to the 12th fret in sequence. Once you have a grasp on that (after perhaps 10-20 mins?) Use a random letter generator to pick out a letter from A-G and do that for 5-10 mins, or whatever you feel appropriate.
And no, the random letter generator won't do sharps or flats, but those won't be hard to figure out if you know where all the normal notes are.
Learn one string at a time (perhaps one a day, one per 2 days maybe?) and make sure you repeat all the other strings you already know daily.

http://www.dave-reed.com/Nifty/randSeq.html
That's a random letter generator you can use, You can select how many letters at a time it displays everytime you generate the letters, and it lets you choose WHAT letters the randomiser uses (A-G for instance) so you won't have to find where Z is on the fretboard

This technique helped me learn the fretboard notes in a short amount of time, But it will take a while longer to become "Fluent" in it.

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Last edited by osXtiger at Sep 5, 2009,
#19
Quote by Maru717
is it any good to try and memorize every note on the fretboard? :/
Yes. There's no need to "memorize" them though. Just to understand how the notes fall on the fretboard and how to name a note will suffice.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#20
These 2 options seem sensible:

1) Name the notes as you play them
2) Read sheet music

#1 is probably frustrating and boring. #2 less so.[/QUOThttps://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/editpost.php?do=editpost&p=21509201#E]


haha i think i would find it really hard to learn sheet music so i guess i'll stick with number 1 instead

oh and has anyone heard of a program called Absolute Fretboard Trainer? Does anyone have some experience using it? it'd be cool to read some reviews about users that have had experience with it, maybe it would be worth getting it.
Last edited by Maru717 at Sep 6, 2009,
#21
I've never memorized the fretboard like one would memorize times tables. I can however tell any interval on my guitar, by sound, and by where the two notes are in relation to eachother, and I know what note is any interval above any other interval, so when I actually need to know the letter name of the note, and not the interval, I can find it within a second.