#1
Hey all, I need some help doing a little bit of a restoration on my beloved Charvel CX391, which after years of hard playing has fallen into a state of disrepair. Basically, the area where the trem posts go into is worn out and stud for the posts are leaning forward and also want to slide up and down. What is the best way to go about fixing this? I was thinking drilling the hole out a hair wider, putting in the dowel, and then redrilling. I assume just normal Elmers wood glue for gluing them in? Anything else to keep in mind (besides making sure I drill it straight). I assume the same procedure also goes for the neck bolt holes in the neck? Also, if dowels come in different woods is there a certain one I should go for? Thanks.

EDIT: Alternatively... how long would such a fix like this last and should I just replace the body (hesitant to do this for obvious reasons)
Last edited by CJRocker at Sep 1, 2009,
#2
i can't help with much but what i do know is that you should try and get the dowels of the same or a complementary wood as the body
#3
That sounds right for your bridge. I'm not sure about the neck bolts though. Alot of the builders here use Titebond Original for gluing. About the type of wood, I'd say try and match your body wood. I don't know how much it would affect your tone though seeing as it's going to be surrounded by glue and most of it will be drilled out.
#4
Alright then, thanks... I don't know if I'll be able to find basswood dowels but I can't imagine that using maple would hurt anything. Guess I'll get the dowels tomorrow and update once I get them in.
#5
you hit the nail on the head with your theory on how to do it, i strongly recommend titebond original to glue the dowels, and you should be able to do this to the neck bolts as well.
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#6
Quote by AngusJimiKeith
you hit the nail on the head with your theory on how to do it, i strongly recommend titebond original to glue the dowels, and you should be able to do this to the neck bolts as well.


Are you sure? I would assume the tension being pulling on the dowels would be far too great, even with titebond original, and they would just rip right out.

..I think


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#7
...i use titebond original to glue set necks, i think it should work fine.
Gibson SG Faded
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Quote by Øttər
Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
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#8
...oh yeahhh
I fcorgot the whole bit about a properly glued joint being stronger thn the wood itself


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

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Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#9
yep, this is true.
Gibson SG Faded
Epi VJ Stack


Quote by Øttər
Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
They stopped asking
#10
Hmm that does bring up an interesting question though; when I glue the dowels do you suggest I put a clamp on them to pull them tighter or not worry about?

EDIT: Possible major issue... keep in mind this is a recessed route. I can't increase the diameter of hole for the studs to put in a larger dowel due to the "ledge" between the route and the pickup cavity going right up to the current holes. So should I sand it back? Or could I dry just drilling it with a drill press and hope the body won't slip when it skims the edge of this ledge? the idea of the bit slipping and screwing it up scares the crap out of me. I hope you all can visualize what I'm talking about.
Last edited by CJRocker at Sep 1, 2009,
#11
Update: Failed, sadly. Just took too much wood out from between where the dowel/trem posts go and the body cavity, as it broke when I went to drill the dowel, even though it was centered and drilled straight; probably caused by the amount of wood taken out, the expansion of the glue, and the pressure of the drill. Just a word of warning if you try and do this; make sure you have enough wood left between the pickup cavity and the dowel if you plan on drilling it out.