#1
im going down to GAK tomorrow to try and maby buy, but i might try a few gibsons i hear they are a hit and miss atm
what should i look out for with any guitar to make sure its the right quality
#2
You'll be able to tell. If it sounds right it's good. If the neck feels right, it's good. If the neck doesn't feel special to you it's not for you. if the tone doesn't feel worth the pricetag put it back. It's little subtle things that add up and make you go "You know, this really doesn't seem worth it's price". From a neck that doesn't feel superb to a neck pickup that's muddy.
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#3
Play them and once you find one that feels right, put it down and wander off. Play something else - come back to that one and play it for a good long while more. Once you are sure that it is the closest to a perfect fit - buy it.
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#4
Yeah Gibsons are very hit and miss at the moment especially the Studio's and apparently to some extent the Standards.
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#6
Quote by Archieisted
so generally the best fit will be of the best quality?


For you it will be. It might not be the right fit to someone else, but if it feels and sounds right to you, then yes, for you its the best quality.
#7
First inspect it for blems. Run you fingers down the sides of the neck and see if there are any sharp frets, too bad you can check the fret level in a store I have found many Gibbys that seem to have made it out of the factory without having the frets leveled. Play the guitars thru the same amp, preferably thru the same amp you have or one you intend to buy. See how well it stays in tune how it sounds etc. Don't just try out the big brands like Gibby and Fender either you will be surprised how good other guitars are. I always try Epis and Gibsons at the same time and 70% of the time I liked an Epi over Gibson. Not being from the UK I have no clue what GAK is but if they have a large selection try out as many guitars as you can. I spend hours in shops and usually bring a few friends and we all like to compare our thoughts 90% of the time we agree.

John
#8
cheers, im trying out as many as i can but u with all brands i dont wanna get suming with 2 frets that sound the same or whatever
#9
Quote by Archieisted
cheers, im trying out as many as i can but u with all brands i dont wanna get suming with 2 frets that sound the same or whatever



You get two frets that sound the same on every guitar lol. The guitar neck starts again after the 12th fret.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#10
Quote by Tokai09
You get two frets that sound the same on every guitar lol. The guitar neck starts again after the 12th fret.


thts the same not but an octave lower, no 2 frets sound the same, different tambre but if frets arnt filled down enough they can sound the same
#11
Quote by Archieisted
thts the same not but an octave lower, no 2 frets sound the same, different tambre but if frets arnt filled down enough they can sound the same


I have a Distiction star in music I think I know that lol. I thought you ment like frets past the 12 fret don't sound the same lol.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#12
One of the most important things to check is the neck, other minor things are easy to address, but a bad neck can become a expensive hassle later on. So first check the action height (I've seen places raise the action to attempt to cover up a bad neck). If the action height is acceptable and you're spending your hard earned $, check every single note for fret buzz. A little bit of fret buzz may be ok, but if you hit any notes that sound muted and dead, goto another guitar.

IMO every make, no matter how expensive, has good and bad necks - you can find a $1500 Fender with a wonky neck, or a $100 Epi with a great one.