#1
Hey guys, I just started playing bass and it ain't half bad since I did use to play guitar so I know what I'm doing to a degree. However, what I'm wondering is if any of you guys have come across any website or material on the internet that shows you common bass chords, or scales. I'm also looking for the platonic bass scale as well, because one of my friends says I should look into that first since I mostly do rock sort of things. If any of you can share, thank you very much.
#2
check the lessons on this site. thats why we have a lesson section
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/bass_lessons/

specifically check the lessons in there entitled, "bass lesson # _______"

EDIT: and by platonic i assume you mean "pentatonic"?
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#3
The same scale and chord theory applies to all instruments.
#4
Chords are the same on bass as on guitar but may sound muddy if played on thicker strings closer to the headstock (relatively). Scales can be googled and found in lessons, columns, etc. on this site.
#5
Platonic bass scale eh...?

Well I guess those jazz musicians do REALLY love their instruments...

Anyway, in my experience (I also transitioned form guitar to bass) everything I knew about scales carried over, they just got shorter...

And as far as playing chords goes, anything other than arpeggios would be suicide... And in that case, I just use the scales to form them, yeah?

Just know your notes, and start stacking m3+M3 etc.

Honestly, if you play rock, unless it's really old school rock, you won't really worry about that...

But props to your for caring about theory, even if you want to be 'just friends' with it...
#6
Heh heh my bad i typed platonic, yes laugh it up that was stupid.

Yeah well anyways thanks for pointing me in the right direction with the chords and whatnot. You see I thought chords on bass would be different, very different because a guitar of course typically has 6 strings, whereas with bass it's usually 4. And yeah Wolffgang you just have to care about theory to a degree, I'm a novice though theory is something I gradually explore.
#7
Quote by Wolffgang
Platonic bass scale eh...?

Well I guess those jazz musicians do REALLY love their instruments...




Quote by Wolffgang
And as far as playing chords goes, anything other than arpeggios would be suicide...


Really? I play chords on bass, as does Lemmy and Steve Harris (and he doesn't even need to make up not having a rhythm guitarist), and even Cliff Burton occasionally. It's not common, sure, but its doable. You just can't play too low or it sounds muddy. As a rule of thumb, normal power chords work to around the open/5th fret on E string A. On other chords, I wouldn't use any where the lowest note is outside the range of a guitar in standard, maybe drop D but thats pushing it.

But, OP, I'd start out with single notes for now.
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Last edited by kugelspot at Sep 2, 2009,
#8
Quote by kugelspot



Really? I play chords on bass, as does Lemmy and Steve Harris (and he doesn't even need to make up not having a rhythm guitarist), and even Cliff Burton occasionally. It's not common, sure, but its doable. You just can't play too low or it sounds muddy. As a rule of thumb, normal power chords work to around the open/5th fret on E string A. On other chords, I wouldn't use any where the lowest note is outside the range of a guitar in standard, maybe drop D but thats pushing it.

But, OP, I'd start out with single notes for now.


Not true.

-4-
-5-
---
-3-


That sounds fine.

It's more to do with the proximity of the notes you use than how low they are.
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#9
^ oh ya, forgot about those. I'm still right about strumed chords.

EDIT: no wait, you could mute the A string and strum that. nevermind
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#11
Quote by martinif157
is it even possible to play chords fingerstyle?

Yes?!?!

Have you not heard of flamenco picking?
Also, have you never seen a classical guitar player?

both use only fingers, yet the chording still works! Mind blowing....
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#12
Chords are chords. if you learn how to construct a chord, you can do it on any instrument.
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#13
Build them up from the root, don't just learn shapes. Like, for a D major chord play

-----
--4--
--5--
--5--

or

--2--
--4--
--5--
-----


Learning intervals is more important as a bassist
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#14
It's the same as guitar chords, but not often used because they sound "muddy"; I've seen Mark Hoppus use chords though, like in Adam's Song, and Greenday's bassist in Longview.....
#15
*MEGA BUMP*

Alright, so I always wanted to learn both bass and guitar, but something is holding me back. So a bass no shit has 4 strings, and a guitar has 6. So how do you just transfer an open chord from a 6 stringed instrument, to a 4 stringed instrument? Or is this one of those things that require a lot of theory, and experience like learning how to construct chords, oh god.
#17
http://www.angelfire.com/id/bass/
some nice scales, chords are made from scales so you can try different combinations or what would really be helpful is if you had guitar pro, you can select bass then you can pick chords and it will show you the standard notation and tab, pretty helpful. I think you have to pay for GP but I didn't if you can't get it then maybe powertab?
#18
Quote by hxc-violinist
*MEGA BUMP*

Alright, so I always wanted to learn both bass and guitar, but something is holding me back. So a bass no shit has 4 strings, and a guitar has 6. So how do you just transfer an open chord from a 6 stringed instrument, to a 4 stringed instrument? Or is this one of those things that require a lot of theory, and experience like learning how to construct chords, oh god.


G chord on guitar
e3
B3
G0
D0
A2
E3

G on Bass
G0
D0
A2
E3

just cut the top off. Or build your own.
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#19
Quote by the_perdestrian
G chord on guitar
e3
B3
G0
D0
A2
E3

G on Bass
G0
D0
A2
E3

just cut the top off. Or build your own.


I'd rather go for

G12
D12
A14
E15
B15*

*5 string/optional
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#20
Quote by pwrmax
The same scale and chord theory applies to all instruments.
This.
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#21
Quote by gilly_90
I'd rather go for

G12
D12
A14
E15
B15*

*5 string/optional


yeah, but they asked for open position and I think my way demonstrated the ease of transferring from a six string instrument to a 4
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#22
I understand what you were doing but open chords on bass really don't sound good (usually)
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Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#23
it depends on how you play them, like a soft upstroke with the pad of your finger sounds alright. but I'll agree that its still pretty muddy.
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#24
Quote by Hobble
Chords are chords. if you learn how to construct a chord, you can do it on any instrument.


wrong
BLUE
RED
YELLOW
#26
Quote by Sad But False
wrong

yeah seriously I learned how to play chords on a mandolin by building them myself.
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#27
I have a bass chord book, it's exactly like the gig bag guitar chord books, but for bass.
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#28
Quote by Sad But False
wrong
Theory is universal.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#29
I'm so confused nobody is saying the same thing right now. I'd like to think theory is universal, cause well that would just make sense otherwise theory would be completely useless. But, I'm not trying to study hours of theory just to learn how to transfer, G, E, and A open chords.
#30
It doesn't take hours of learning. Try this:

1) Take the root of the chord, for example, A
2) Write out all the notes of the root notes major scale:

A B C# D E F# G# A

This gives you, in order the root, major second, major third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, major sixth, major seventh and perfect octave

Now, a major triad takes the root, the major third and the perfect fifth of a scale. For an A, that means that a major triad consists of A, C# and E. Simple. Look at your bass, work out where these notes are and play yourself an A triad. If you remember this information, you can apply it for any major triad. Now, try and extend your knowledge to other chords. The minor triad is almost the same as the major triad. The only difference is that instead of a major third, you have a minor third above the root, making A C E for the A minor triad. It really isn't a difficult concept. If someone asks you to name the notes in the A7 chord (A major with a minor seventh), then you take the major chord, and add the minor seventh of the scale. You know what the major seventh is- G#. The minor seventh is a semitone below that, which is G. The main headsup with the 7th is that a plain 7 means the minor form, whilst maj7 means the major form. It may sound daunting, but try the above with the C as the root. It's easier once you work through it a couple of times.
#32
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It doesn't take hours of learning. Try this:

1) Take the root of the chord, for example, A
2) Write out all the notes of the root notes major scale:

A B C# D E F# G# A

This gives you, in order the root, major second, major third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, major sixth, major seventh and perfect octave

Now, a major triad takes the root, the major third and the perfect fifth of a scale. For an A, that means that a major triad consists of A, C# and E. Simple. Look at your bass, work out where these notes are and play yourself an A triad. If you remember this information, you can apply it for any major triad. Now, try and extend your knowledge to other chords. The minor triad is almost the same as the major triad. The only difference is that instead of a major third, you have a minor third above the root, making A C E for the A minor triad. It really isn't a difficult concept. If someone asks you to name the notes in the A7 chord (A major with a minor seventh), then you take the major chord, and add the minor seventh of the scale. You know what the major seventh is- G#. The minor seventh is a semitone below that, which is G. The main headsup with the 7th is that a plain 7 means the minor form, whilst maj7 means the major form. It may sound daunting, but try the above with the C as the root. It's easier once you work through it a couple of times.


Oh. I didn't much understand any of that but I guess there really is no easy way to do that. Lol I don't think I care anymore.
Last edited by hxc-violinist at Dec 1, 2009,
#33
why are you wanting to play full chords on a bass? thats gonna sound really muddy and more than likely horrid
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#34
^um I'd disagree with that statement as would Les Claypool and dozens others, but to each his own.

Now learning chords--learning chord theory is important beyond the "playing chords" on bass. Knowing chord theory will help you write better bass lines and learn bass lines easier because you will hear and understand why they sound good or bad against certain chord progressions.
#35
Quote by hxc-violinist
Oh. I didn't much understand any of that but I guess there really is no easy way to do that. Lol I don't think I care anymore.


What's so difficult about that? You have all the majors and perfects in the major scale. If the chord you want to write is described as having, for example, the root, augmented fourth and minor seventh, you look at the scale, find the relevant "number" (Root, fourth and seventh) and do what the prefix tells you- augment the fourth (perfect fourth up a semitone) and minor the seventh (major seventh down a semitone).

NB: You have minor and major for all "numbers", but the perfect fourth and perfect fifth can be augmented or diminished- augmented goes up a semitone, diminished goes down a semitone). The augmented fourth/diminished fifth are the same for the sake of simplicity at the moment, and this can also be called the tritone.

Take another note, write out all the degrees of it's major scale, and write underneath each note if it's the root, major second etc. Then take the notes you haven't used in that scale, write them out, and give them their name based on logic- the first note in the chromatic scale that you haven't used, between the perfect root and the maor second will be the minor second.

Taking the time to try this will help you wonders, and will end up helping you across more than just chords.
#36
Quote by food1010
Theory is universal.


not all instruments have the ability to play multiple notes
BLUE
RED
YELLOW
#37
Quote by Sad But False
not all instruments have the ability to play multiple notes


But all instruments have the ability to influence the overall sound by utilising the indeed universal concept of musical theory. It doesn't matter if an instrument can or can't play multiple notes, all instruments can still utilise the same theory. To a trumpet, a major triad still uses the root, third, and fifth. Using musical theory, the trumpet can further influence this chord by playing a 7th over it.