#1
I figure this would be the place to psot this, if not please point me where to go. Anyways, I've been thinking more and more about trying to strive for being a producer, even if it's just a side hobby. I'd like to start practicing now, but I have no clue how to! I've been told to make a studio, but in my current living situation that's not possible. What would be the next best thing? I was thinking if I got a laptop, put some sort of program on it (any names here?) and started practicing mixing, making beats, and recording, then it'd be a good start. What do y'all think?
#2
get audacity that is a good free program you could experiment with
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#3
I think you want to practice being a sound engineer, they're ones that actually mix stuff and edit tracks to make them sound good. Producers are just pretentious wankers who tell the engineer what to do and then take all the credit. Usually.
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#4
Pro tools. Audacity is **** compared to any program you pay for. It is great for demos, but not for anything semi-serious.

But being a producer isn't just mixing, it is arranging songs so they sound best, and adding to them, changing parts. Basically acting as another member in the band.

Try talking to a small time band in your area that is doing some recording and ask to work with them for free.
#5
To become a producer you really need a good understanding of the theory behind production. Have a very good grasp of mics, mic placement, room acoustics ect. You also need a high level of understanding of things such as critical frequency bands in relation to EQ, mix spacing and all sorts of things that will take a very, very long time to explain.

Your best bet is training to become an audio engineer. Of course you can learn the tricks yourself, but it'll be hard to actually get hired without some form of qualification.

You also need to be prepared to listen to the same few seconds of track over and over for several hours until it looses all meaning and context.
Last edited by rizo299 at Sep 2, 2009,
#6
pretty much all things said above

if ur in college there should be an audio class, or something if not u should do some research/experiment with it ur self



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#7
Oh, haha. Some miscommunication on my part. I thought a producer was the guy who records, adds studio effects, mixes and makes everything sound good? This man is called the sound engineer? I mean, I want to do that, and then the whole advirtising, giving ideas, and things like that.

Also, so Pro Tools would be the best?

EDIT: Like Rick Rubin! He's a producer right? I want to be doing things like that!
Last edited by Imme94 at Sep 2, 2009,
#8
Heres what you do as ive heard axemanchris say countless time so credit to him:

Go to a studio ask to work there for free. I dont care what they have you doing, if your goin to get coffee and cigs then you do that as good as you possibly can. start hanging around the producers learn everything you can, eventually get to the point where he is telling you where to put up the mics etc etc. Then one day down the line if youve worked hard enough, maybe one of the low level producers is sick, and this small time local band wants to lay down the tracks, you may get this job.

The industry doesnt care about a certificate that says your good, they want to hear what youve done. the best way to learn is being in the mix and learning first hand, its a long road and a long shot but its not impossible
#9
Thanks man! But for right now, I'm just trying to figure out how to do it. I want to get some basic idea of how to mix and everything before going with all that!
#10
Thats kinda the point of going through all that, but if your not ready to put that kind of time in. then yes i suggest pro tools and trial and error
#11
Yeah man, I just don't have that kind of time right now, once I finish this last year of high school that'd be something I'd do. As for the pro tools, which version would be best?
#12
I personally love Cubase, with a couple pre-amps and a condenser mic, there is little you can't do. Obviously it would change with what you're recording, but I've recorded full drum kits with a single mic and it didn't sound half bad. A lot of it is just pure experimentation dude, I know people that do this on a near professional level so I learn a lot from them but really, for what you like, only you can figure that out.

You may want to talk and try some friends or stores equipment before you start spending large amounts on equipment, but it is a valuable thing to get into, you save ridiculous amounts if you ever intend to record!

Hope this helped,

Peace
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#13
A producer is not the same as an audio engineer.

You could say that a producer is the Music equivalent of a Film director.

He has a vision of how things will come out best in the mix.

To give an analogy on this;

You can have an actor do an amazing monologue of a sad story, but if the set is cheery, then it will not come out to it's full potential.

How this relates to music?

A producer for example might change a melody, because the voice of a singer sounds nicer like that.

He says when to sign more energetic, and when more soft.

These are 2 examples for singing, but there are loads of them for every sound in the mix.

Most of the people that a professionals have a talent for this, though with a lot of experience you can be just as good or better, but having a natural adaptation for objectivity, and "hearing"things helps loads.

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#14
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#16
sound engineering is pretty difficult and isnt really great pay unless you get a lot of work and work your way up to land jobs with successful bands. i do it myself and its not as easy as getting audacity and just recording some guitar tracks. its also expensive to get into in terms of buying gear.

but if you want to do it for a laugh just recording stuff then yea, go for it.
#17
Quote by Ed Hunter
I think you want to practice being a sound engineer, they're ones that actually mix stuff and edit tracks to make them sound good. Producers are just pretentious wankers who tell the engineer what to do and then take all the credit. Usually.


#18
Quote by xxdarrenxx
A producer is not the same as an audio engineer.

You could say that a producer is the Music equivalent of a Film director.

He has a vision of how things will come out best in the mix.

To give an analogy on this;

You can have an actor do an amazing monologue of a sad story, but if the set is cheery, then it will not come out to it's full potential.

How this relates to music?

A producer for example might change a melody, because the voice of a singer sounds nicer like that.

He says when to sign more energetic, and when more soft.

These are 2 examples for singing, but there are loads of them for every sound in the mix.

Most of the people that a professionals have a talent for this, though with a lot of experience you can be just as good or better, but having a natural adaptation for objectivity, and "hearing"things helps loads.


A producer usually has to spend along time working as an engineer before they are trusted with production. Unless you've shown yourself to be pretty handy at engineering already, there's practically no way to jump directly into production.

Even if you could, you'd be a terrible producer if you couldn't understand the process that the mix goes through to get to the final product. A producer needs an intimate knowledge of engineering to produce effectively.
#19
Quote by Imme94
Oh, haha. Some miscommunication on my part. I thought a producer was the guy who records, adds studio effects, mixes and makes everything sound good? This man is called the sound engineer? I mean, I want to do that, and then the whole advirtising, giving ideas, and things like that.

Also, so Pro Tools would be the best?


EDIT: Like Rick Rubin! He's a producer right? I want to be doing things like that!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_audio_workstation

There's a really good list of DAWs here for you to go through. I recommend investigating each one and finding out what it's strengths and weaknesses are. There is no "best program" for producing, it all comes down to what you want to do. Don't just take the first suggestion thrown at you based on the fact that the person loves it; they may have a completely different need out of their program than you do. I like Logic Pro, and it's really good for recording instrumental music, and it's OK for the electronic stuff I do, but I would prefer to have Ableton Live and Renoise for producing IDM.

Don't limit yourself to one DAW. You can use as many as your bank account will allow. At the same time though, once you do get a program, learn it inside and out. Read the manual cover to cover, look up tutorial videos on the internet, and get as many VST, AU, RTAS or whatever format plugins you can. Any program you get will suit your needs fine, as long as you learn how to use it.
#20
what kind of music do you want to be producing, as your role varies somewhat depending on the genre?
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#22
Quote by rizo299
A producer usually has to spend along time working as an engineer before they are trusted with production. Unless you've shown yourself to be pretty handy at engineering already, there's practically no way to jump directly into production.

Even if you could, you'd be a terrible producer if you couldn't understand the process that the mix goes through to get to the final product. A producer needs an intimate knowledge of engineering to produce effectively.



Yes, I know.

My post was more about of the qualities of a (good) producer, and not how to become one in a business sense.

Besides, they often go hand to hnd, because a good producer usually has it in his personally to do things his way (or else he would someone else do producing).

You can see that the good producers often write, play an instrument or two, know how to mix, and have a vision.

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#23
I'm going to college for it.
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#24
Quote by jwax
get audacity that is a good free program you could experiment with

Not this.

You won't learn **** about mixing using Audacity. Download other programs if you're cheap or buy them.
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#25
is your avatar a guy painted blue hitting a bong?
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#26
Production isn't bad to get into. Like most people are saying the producer and sound engineer work hand in hand most of the time..... or so it use to be. The way things are starting to shift is that the producer will get a song, send the idea to the drummer, who lives in Florida, who records and sends it back, then the producer will look it over and send it to the guitarist, who lives elsewhere, and so on and so forth til it is done.

The producers job is to make sure that whatever he is producing will become the next hit song. The producer is more concerned with song structure, the groove, the feel, how you relate to the song, basically that the artists message gets through loud and clear.

The engineer on the other hand is the one that worries about mics, mic placement, FX, the tone of the snare drum, vox, and every other technical aspect of the entire process.

Simply put:

Producer = Creative
Engineer = Technical

There are a lot of good schools out there for audio engineering (Middle Tennessee State University or MTSU and Belmont just to name a couple) but whatever you do, don't get lured into those tech colleges you see on tv. They are a waste of money, cause even though they might get you connections in the industry they really don't teach you how to operate in the studio effiecently.
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#27
Take it from me, and the semester long DMIP "Industry Perspectives" Coruse that I completed roughly 2 years ago in my first year of uni. It was basically 13 weeks of industry professionals telling us how they got where they are. Heard of "Flock Of Seagulls"? Their producer addressed us for 8 weeks.

To become a producer you must:

1. Love music

2. Pursue some kind of higher education (Diploma/Degree) that focuses on music technology (not arrangement or theory, just the technology) to better understand the physics of capturing sound, and more specifically what sounds like what, where and why it sounds that way.

3. If number 2, didn't take you this far (a degree will) learn the fundamentals of song structure, time signatures, keys, key changes, arrangement (both modern and classical).

4. You are now completely geared up to be a recording Engineer. But you won't be, you WILL start off as a lacky of some type.

5. Work Hard.

6. After some time someone will move on from the place you are working/you will find a job far greater than the one you currently hold. NOW you are an engineer.

7. Work Hard.

8. Eventually after all your hard work people will start to recognize your traits as a recording/mix engineer, at which point they may specifically ask you to head up a project. You are now Head Engineer.

9. As head engineer you may also be asked to also budget and plan for the sessions involved in the project. You will organize talent and instruments as well as a structured timetable for recording. Now you are a Producer.

Case and point. Producers do not only 'make beats'. They are basically studio time/money/business/talent managers who spend their time getting everyone organized. They will have a plethora of engineers working beneath them to do the real recording. Whilst the producer will listen in a use his enormous prowess to change aspects in order to improve the overall product.

Modern Hip/Hop 'producers' however. Well... they really do just make beats.

To get started TS, I suggest getting a laptop, a copy of reaper, an interface, a mic and a couple of good musicians and start figuring out what sounds you like. Also, take high school physics, it will be seriously helpful.

EDIT: For the sake of my ego, I'm at step 7 right now.
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Last edited by Shredder XXX at Sep 3, 2009,
#28
Quote by Shredder XXX

9. As head engineer you may also be asked to also budget and plan for the sessions involved in the project. You will organize talent and instruments as well as a structured timetable for recording. Now you are a Producer.

Case and point. Producers do not only 'make beats'. They are basically studio time/money/business/talent managers who spend their time getting everyone organized. They will have a plethora of engineers working beneath them to do the real recording. Whilst the producer will listen in a use his enormous prowess to change aspects in order to improve the overall product.

Modern Hip/Hop 'producers' however. Well... they really do just make beats.

To get started TS, I suggest getting a laptop, a copy of reaper, an interface, a mic and a couple of good musicians and start figuring out what sounds you like. Also, take high school physics, it will be seriously helpful.

EDIT: For the sake of my ego, I'm at step 7 right now.


That's not producing, that's more managing.

An artist will book time at a studio at the studio's rate (or negotiated rate, depends on your clout), then the artist or more likely the label will hire a producer to come in and well... produce your material.

Producing has pretty much become a free lance job now. A producer doesn't work for a studio, they work for the artist. A producer doesn't have to know all the technical aspects of the studio, that's what the engineer is for, but it is important that the producer and engineer communicate efficiently in order to achieve a commercially viable product. So in other words a producer needs to know the basics of tracking and mixing, but more importantly the producer needs to have a great understanding of commercial songwriting and the current trends in the industry.
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#29
For the TS, most producers do not start with the sound engineer route, most of 'em started out as musicians:

Rick Rubin - Musician (though not a very good one apparently)
Trevor Horn - Backing musician (then formed Buggles)
Brian Eno - Musician
Bob Rock - Guitarist / musician

The music industry is ALL about who you know, making contacts etc, you cannot plan a career in the music industry, it either happens or it don't TBH.

SH
Last edited by SmellyHarold at Sep 3, 2009,