#1
I want to do some lead stuff, but i'm not sure where to start.

I've been practiceing the A minor Penatonic Scale in the 5 positions. I can't just play the A minor Penatonic in the 4th postion, I have to work my way down.

Every time I move up or down a whole step or a half step I screw up the scale.

I want to know what I should be learning or practiceing to get better?
#2
Practice slower.
Quote by CoreysMonster
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#4
about the pentatonic, just keep playing every position slowly. once you get confortable with them,you can start playing the scale horizontaly. when you can do this, try combining diferent positions and play the scale diagonaly.

and learn the major scale,using the same metod: verticaly first, horizontaly and then diagonaly.
you may also want to start practicing bending and legato.
#5
Quote by Antonio23
about the pentatonic, just keep playing every position slowly. once you get confortable with them,you can start playing the scale horizontaly. when you can do this, try combining diferent positions and play the scale diagonaly.

and learn the major scale,using the same metod: verticaly first, horizontaly and then diagonaly.
you may also want to start practicing bending and legato.


So the just the major scale or the major pentatonic?
#6
Programming. When you can see it in your mind, you can learn to play it. This is the corner stone of all learning.

So, picture the scale in the 1st position... not note by note, but the whole scale at once. Then in the other position... and so on. If you can't do it, just try harder... see how it goes with a guitar and then try to see it in your mind again. Then the other positions. Then the same thing with another key.

This might be slow at first, but when you practice it, it gets easier and faster. Learn how to learn.
#7
Make yourself keep changing keys - if you don't you end up relying on your inlays to know where you are, which makes it a pig to play in any other key. If you change keys from the start you learn the notes in relation to each other, not in relation to the inlays, and it makes life a whole lot easier.

Being able to guickly find intervals on the neck helps lots too - learn how to find octaves, 3rds and 5ths easily and if you get lost you should be able to work your way back to your comfort zone using intervals.
#8
Don't just robotically move your fingers through shapes either - make sure you're always thinking about what sound you want and paying attention to the sounds you're actually making. If you don't like the sound you've made ask yourself why you didn't like it and see what you can change to make something you do like.

Also, the best way I've found to remember a scale is to relate it to the chords derived from it...so for the minor pentatonic that's the chords derived from the relative minor key. You should really never approach a scale in isolation, always study the chords too as they're all dependent on each other. It helps you learn where the scale is, it helps you understand how it works, it helps you know when to us it

For example, A minor pentatonic is obviously derived from the A minor scale and is most often used in the key of A minor.

The notes are A C D E G
The chords of A minor are Amin Bdim Cmaj Dmin Emin Fmaj Gmaj

If you get a blank fretboard diagram and draw those chords out as 6 string barre chords, then draw out the patterns of the A minor pentatonic scale you'll see how it all fits within those chords...it may seem a trivial exercise but going through the process of writing it all down gets you thinking about it and really helps you to understand how it all relates to each other.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Sep 2, 2009,
#9
Quote by steven seagull
Don't just robotically move your fingers through shapes either - make sure you're always thinking about what sound you want and paying attention to the sounds you're actually making.


Well, if you're not ENLIGHTENED, you're not gonna be able to keep track of what you're playing ALWAYS. It's very tiring mentally to do this... and nobody does it. It's true, that it might be a good idea to think what you play occasionally... but the autopilot mode is also something that's good to have.
#10
On the contrary, it's vital you get into that habit early on. keep things simple and focus on consciously creating something. Later on when you're more experieced and more knowledgeable, then yes, you can allow things to flow out because you're far more likely to get something good.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by steven seagull
On the contrary, it's vital you get into that habit early on. keep things simple and focus on consciously creating something. Later on when you're more experieced and more knowledgeable, then yes, you can allow things to flow out because you're far more likely to get something good.
I don't think you think about the sound any less as you get more experienced either - if anything you can focus more exclusively on the sound as you don't have to think about where your fingers are going or what notes you are playing like us noobs
#13
my tip to playing good lead , is to work on your singing, if you can hum or sing a simple melody , then you can work it out on the guitar , you can do the same with one hand on a piano .
you can add techniques like string bending and teeth tapping at a later date .
just learn simple melodies , blues ,Celtic, classical,folk ect don't worry, you can translate it all into rock and metal shredding at a later date , should you wish
#14
So what I should be doing is:

Learnig Basic Chords
Practiceing the Minor Penatonic Scale in the 5 postions
#15
And most importantly learning how they fit together...just keep in mind that your fingers aren't the be all and end all of playing the guitar, only part of the puzzle. Get your mind thinking musically and also get those ears trained to recognise what you're creating, make the effort to mentally associate what you do with your hands with the sound that comes out.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
Ok, so while i'm practicing a scale or a chord, I should know what notes are in that scale/chord.
#17
Quote by Blckspawn
I want to do some lead stuff, but i'm not sure where to start.

I've been practiceing the A minor Penatonic Scale in the 5 positions. I can't just play the A minor Penatonic in the 4th postion, I have to work my way down.

Every time I move up or down a whole step or a half step I screw up the scale.

I want to know what I should be learning or practiceing to get better?


Well, for starters..... some lead stuff


studying theory will ultimately help as well, but you have to start at the beginning and work your way up.


There's is lots to learn. Be patient, have fun with it.
shred is gaudy music
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, for starters..... some lead stuff


studying theory will ultimately help as well, but you have to start at the beginning and work your way up.


There's is lots to learn. Be patient, have fun with it.


any suggestions?
#19
Quote by Blckspawn
any suggestions?


Well, what kind of lead stuff do you want to play? Jazz, rock, heavy, metal, blues, country?

Some things you might wanna consider learning:
* chord changes (helps your lead stuff immensily, too)
* theory, like scales from different positions, intervals etc.
* your ear. try to transcribe some solos so you learn to hear different kinda stuff, this eases the learning process too, when trying to learn a new song etc.
* then the practical stuff: legato (hammerons, pulloffs), bending, slides, vibrato
* picking accuracy is good to have down too
* try to get your fingers work independently
#20
Practice your scales and modes with a metronome so you can develop accuracy and speed. Start slow and build up speed in increments.
#21
Quote by January85
Well, what kind of lead stuff do you want to play? Jazz, rock, heavy, metal, blues, country?

Some things you might wanna consider learning:
* chord changes (helps your lead stuff immensily, too)
* theory, like scales from different positions, intervals etc.
* your ear. try to transcribe some solos so you learn to hear different kinda stuff, this eases the learning process too, when trying to learn a new song etc.
* then the practical stuff: legato (hammerons, pulloffs), bending, slides, vibrato
* picking accuracy is good to have down too
* try to get your fingers work independently


Its more Metal type stuff.
#22
Quote by Blckspawn
any suggestions?


Sure.... find some solo's you like. Pick one..... learn it.

Id name a bunch of techniques or concepts to work on but if you work on music, you'll be encountering/learning them anyway.... and in the proper context.


As far as theory ...... learn to read music..... then get a theory book and/or a teacher or take a class.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 3, 2009,
#23
Quote by GuitarMunky
Sure.... find some solo's you like. Pick one..... learn it.

Id name a bunch of techniques or concepts to work on but if you work on music, you'll be encountering/learning them anyway.... and in the proper context.


As far as theory ...... learn to read music..... then get a theory book and/or a teacher or take a class.


I don't have money to get a teacher. I'm taking notes that I find are useful and putting them in a binder.
#24
Quote by Blckspawn
I don't have money to get a teacher. I'm taking notes that I find are useful and putting them in a binder.


I hear ya. That's a tough way to go about learning it, but it's better than nothing, and I'm sure you can still learn alot. Good luck.
shred is gaudy music
#25
Quote by zhilla
Make yourself keep changing keys - if you don't you end up relying on your inlays to know where you are, which makes it a pig to play in any other key. If you change keys from the start you learn the notes in relation to each other, not in relation to the inlays, and it makes life a whole lot easier.

Being able to guickly find intervals on the neck helps lots too - learn how to find octaves, 3rds and 5ths easily and if you get lost you should be able to work your way back to your comfort zone using intervals.

Yeah I totally dig that man. I rely on my inlays all the time now that I think about it, I don't need to but I definately do it when i'm in one of the easy open keys
#26
Quote by trashbeast
Yeah I totally dig that man. I rely on my inlays all the time now that I think about it, I don't need to but I definately do it when i'm in one of the easy open keys


My guitar doesn't have inlays.
#27
Quote by Blckspawn
My guitar doesn't have inlays.
After a while, you won't need them. The dots on the side are plenty, and you shouldn't have to look at your fretboard to know what you're doing (once you master a technique, not while you're still practicing).
#28
Quote by Blckspawn
My guitar doesn't have inlays.
I count dots on the side as the same thing. If you always play in one key, you subconsciously use the dots as a reference point.