#1
So i bought an epiphone les paul standard plus top. had it for about 4-5 months. last week, it started happening.

i noticed a drop in the output of the treble pickup. ON CLEAN the rhythm pup is full bodied and loud but the treble sounds thin and almost half as loud. ON OD, the difference is evened out and the difference in clean output is not apparent.

This all started about 1 month after my purchase when i noticed that sometimes when i switched pups, the output in the treble pickup would drop, like it is now. except now its all the time. before i could flip the toggle switch repeatedly to fix the output. the momentary output drop when toggling first occured in the rhythm then in the treble.

i opened up the cavities on the toggle switch and the controls. tapped around to see if it was a loose solder. but i DID NOTHING to the wiring. mines hairier than i thought it would be. couldnt find a loose solder. when i popped the covers back on, the permanent treble output decrease started.

and now im wondering what i should do.

should i take it in to the repair shop? if so, what do i tell them?

is it fixible myself? i can solder. i built a small amp recently.

what do you guys think it is? loose solder? a broken toggle switch? something wrong with the treble pup? the pots?

thanks in advance!!
#6
Resolder it? If you have a decent amp already, I'd just replace the pickups entirely...
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#7
i have a crappy squier amp. gonna get MAYBE a rebel 20 soon.

pickups after amp.
#10
seriously, how do i fix it?

and yes im bumping cuz i raelly wanna get rid of this problem
#11
Already been answered. If the connection is bad resolder it. I'd replace everything personally, but that's up to you.
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#12
lets say i dont have the money to buy new pickups YET. what should i do?

how do i find the bad solder? i mean. if im still getting a signal, it means that the connection is still there right? a bad solder would mean intermittance in signal and not decrease in signal level?
#13
A bad solder joint could give you a poor signal. Check all of the connections for the bridge pup. If you have a VOM meter you can check the joint. Put it on resistance and set it to the lowest setting. Now put your leads on either side of the solder joint. If it reads more than 0 ohms then resolder it.
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Last edited by Kevin Saale at Sep 2, 2009,
#14
ok my dads gonna have to dig up his vom meter. so should i check all solder joints? cuz it has happened to my neck pup before.

so:

Lead ---------------------Solder----------------------------Lead ???

how can you use resistance tho? how can a loose solder cause resistance in a circuit?
#15
A bad solder joint (not necessarily loose) will have more resistance than a good one. You won't necessarily find one that shows a resistance. If that's the case then I'd just re heat each joint and apply a small amount of solder. If that doesn't fix it then there might be a problem with your pup. Check it's resistance if it isn't within spec (you'd have to look that up) then you have a problem.
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#16
wow your more help than anyone in the GB&C forum. thanks a million for the patience!!!

but a regular solder joint shoould have 0 resistance? well at least i have something to work at. its a good starting point.

i would love it if the pup was f-ed up. cuz that would make a perfect excuse to get my parents to buy a new pup : D. DUNCAN 59 HERE I COME!!!
#17
Quote by Kevin Saale
A bad solder joint (not necessarily loose) will have more resistance than a good one. You won't necessarily find one that shows a resistance. If that's the case then I'd just re heat each joint and apply a small amount of solder. If that doesn't fix it then there might be a problem with your pup. Check it's resistance if it isn't within spec (you'd have to look that up) then you have a problem.

+1

I just learning something.
#18
Just because it reads zero doesn't mean the joint is necessarily good. If it reads more than zero you know it's bad for sure though.
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#19
ok so really, all i can do is to re-solder everything and if it doesnt work, get new pups. right?

what can the people at a repair shop do?
#21
I highly doubt it's a pickup problem.

In addition to the fact that it's very difficult for a pickup to stop working, Epiphones are notorious for their crappy electronics parts. Worst case scenario is that you'd have to replace the switch.
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 2, 2009,
#22
i thoguth it was the switch problem at first but thought about it and it should be. so im gonna voltmeter it tomorrow. and see whats gonna happen.
#23
bump

ok about resoldering the joints. i remember you told me to "reheat the joints and add solder". the new solder would be on top of the older solder right? so how could it help conductivity? would i have to remove the older solder first?
#24
no

i don't think so


the new solder will 'bond' with the old under the right temp giving you a better connection.


think of the atoms and elements that are 'bonding' together to give you a better connection...

does that help?
#25
ahhh. i didnt think of the fact that the old solder would melt and mix with the new solder. i was thinking of the old solder as an independent unchangable platform thing.

so is there a special way to resolder? or do i just solder on top of the existing mass AFTER i reheat it?
#26
Quote by Luxifer
bump

ok about resoldering the joints. i remember you told me to "reheat the joints and add solder". the new solder would be on top of the older solder right? so how could it help conductivity? would i have to remove the older solder first?
typically the problem with a bad joint is that there is poor conductivity in the joint because the components you are soldering together were not hot enough for the solder to actually flow onto the parts and make a good connection. Solder is just solder, whether it's new solder or old solder doesn't matter, you can make a bad joint with new solder as well that would be just as bad as the old one. You don't have to remove the old solder, but i would, just because it makes it easier.

First thing to keep in mind when trying to avoid cold joints when you solder, you need to make sure there is a good electrical connection there. The biggest mistake people make when they first start soldering is that they melt the solder onto the components directly using the iron. Do not do this, you have to make sure that the leads or lugs that you are connecting are hot enough for the solder to flow onto them. This ensures a good connection.
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 3, 2009,
#27
you have to heat up the 'joints' anyway for things to 'stick'

(so heat up the connection and have your new solder ready and try to make tear drop solder joint when you are 'connecting')


so yes.


I think. Man, don't ask me - I'm F'd up.
#28
Quote by al112987
typically the problem with a bad joint is that there is poor conductivity in the joint because the components you are soldering together were not hot enough for the solder to actually flow onto the parts and make a good connection. Solder is just solder, whether it's new solder or old solder doesn't matter, you can make a bad joint with new solder as well that would be just as bad as the old one. You don't have to remove the old solder, but i would, just because it makes it easier.

First thing to keep in mind when trying to avoid cold joints when you solder, you need to make sure there is a good electrical connection there. The biggest mistake people make when they first start soldering is that they melt the solder onto the components directly using the iron. Do not do this, you have to make sure that the leads or lugs that you are connecting are hot enough for the solder to flow onto them. This ensures a good connection.


how do i remove the old solder? i heat it or something?

i do not understand the bolded part. you mean they put the solder on the iron and carrying it to the joint without heating the joint? i always heat the connections before adding solder.
#29
no you misread, you are doing it correctly, heat the connection, not the solder, you bolded the tail end of what I was saying.

remove the old solder using a braid or one of those solder sucker things. I just use a braid.

but no you're right, heat the connection, the only solder you should be touching directly to the iron is the solder you're using to tin the tip.
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 3, 2009,
#31
it's basically a wick for solder, you can get it at radioshack for like.. $2
#32
Quote by al112987
no you misread, you are doing it correctly, heat the connection, not the solder, you bolded the tail end of what I was saying.

remove the old solder using a braid or one of those solder sucker things. I just use a braid.

but no you're right, heat the connection, the only solder you should be touching directly to the iron is the solder you're using to tin the tip.



OK. I was wrong. Remove the old solder. Good luck man.
#33
it's not absolutely necessary, I don't usually do it myself, but it's more due to laziness. Idk, I never learned to properly solder and had a bunch of problems until I started building and modding things, after I finished my amp, I went back and redid all the joints in all my guitars.
#34
cool

I can see how an old 'bad solder joint' metal situation can corrupt a connection....


Can't you 'kinda' move the old over to the side while you are heating it up and drop new solder on top?

I guess it wouldn't hurt to try the 'lazy' way first and if first you don't succeed, try try again.
#35
wow. its been a while

so i got my multimeter and finally tested the resistance on the connections. they were all at 0. however, i did notice that i couldnt test the R across the cap on the tone knobs. is that normal?

so im guessing my nexxt step would be to resolder the joints right?
#36
Yh Happened to my les paul, it seems like a common problem with epiphones, I think it's the toggle switch
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#37
erg my dad doesnt want me re soldering the guitar cuz his soldering iron is pretty ****. im gonna have to bring the guitar in ...

on that note, is there anything i can do besides resoldering?
#38
It could also just be a dirty switch - spray it with some contact cleaner like Servisol.
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#39
Quote by al112987
I highly doubt it's a pickup problem.

In addition to the fact that it's very difficult for a pickup to stop working, Epiphones are notorious for their crappy electronics parts. Worst case scenario is that you'd have to replace the switch.


+1 to that

I've got an Epiphone G-400. I've had it for 7 months now and the pickup selector is getting shoddy. I had the EXACT some problem as you, OP, where my neck pup would weaken until I fiddled with the knob a little bit more. Who knows...in a couple of weeks it might just pop and die completely .
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#40
well i think i have a special case here. i checked all the joints again with a different more accurate digital multimeter. the joints were fine until i found something i did not find with the analog multimeter...

i got a reading of 11.5something and 8.57. these are my readings on the pickups that i got somehow fiddling with the joints on the POTS. so anyways, i got my epiphone catalogue cuz i remembered it had the R values of all the pups they use. i matched it up. the neck pickup was supposed to be 8.5 and i got 8.57, which means its good. the treble pup however... was supposed to be 13. something and i got 11.5. so that must mean its bad right? i mean, a decline in R does mean less output.

so im going to replace my treble pup with an SD '59.

that is, unless i did something wrong?