#1
Hey guys....quick question. My band is a blues/rock trio band so its only drums, 1 guitar, 1 bass, vocals and back up vocals. Pretty soon we're going to start recording our first actual CD to replace our demo EP. When that time comes I don't really have a good idea on how to make it sound. I'm afraid that it will sound too empty or something.

Drums are DW drums and A custom cymbals so they'll most likely turn out pretty good. Bass is a 6-string ibanez SRG or something like that in an Acoustic brand head. I'll have that direct in and also mic'ed at the cab. My guitar is a Fender Standard Strat with Texas special pickups into a Hot Rod Deluxe with all the stuff listed in my signature. I could obviously double track the guitars but how often does that happen in a blues/rock/funk situation? When I listen to SRV, Clapton, and Mayer it doesn't really seem to me that those guitars are double tracked. I know Mayer doesn't cuz I heard him say it on a video once.

Just thinkin about it and thought I'd get some opinions.....
#3
If you're on a limited budget and don't have much gear, you might get a great result by recording it all live (except vocals) with a stereo pair of condenser mics.
Find a room where the band sound really good, mess around with the mics until you find a spot where everything sounds sweet, then let rip. Then you can overdub guitar solos and vocals, preferably in the same room to get a semi-live feel.

This method can really give really sweet results for blues/rock, classic rock as it has a very 'vintage' feel. However, it requires a tight band, great guitar tones, a solid well-tuned kit, good microphones, and a nice room with the right ambience to play in.

To mix, all you should need is a little bit of 'verb (perhaps a touch more than you'd usually use depending on the room), maybe some master bus compression to taste, and a little bit of overall EQ to balance the sound.
#4
I wouldn't say that double tracking the guitar is the answer, but double micing would certainly help.
You could try 2 57's on the front, one just off the centre of the cone, one angled towards the side, and if you can get into a nice big room put a large diaphragm condenser a few feet back to get some reverb/ambience.

Also - the way you mix it is going to be key. You'll probably want to use a little more compression than usual, as well as EQing with plenty of mids (but not enough to make anything muddy)
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#6
I guess I should have mentioned what we're recording with. It's not really the recording I'm worried about...just the mixing/EQing. I have a presonus firestudio project, I use Apple Logic, and we have a bunch of SM57/58's, audio-technica AT20202, an MXL9000, and two Sterling Audio ST31s.

I dunno maybe I'm just paranoid haha Our EP doesn't sound empty and we only spent 3 days on it in the studio we went to. I just want it to sound full and good so it's a good representation of our band. Keep pitching thoughts and ideas though!
#10
catharsis, he's asking about mastering and stuff. ya know, the stuff AFTER its recording. not how to mic stuff, and what to mic it with.