#1
I always hear that your guitar finish coming off is a good thing. I just wanted to know exactly how much is going to come off..

The guy who sold me my guitar new at a local music store (I've had it for nearly two years and asked him to make sure everything on it was fine) could tell that I play it plenty and I showed him the little place where my finish is rubbing off. He told me my sweat wasn't very acidic if I remember correctly.

I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio and the finish is white and the spot where I rest my hand is turning pink. So, what can I expect my finish to look like in the future?
Last edited by Jfsmith at Sep 3, 2009,
#2
It's going to look like a strawberry shortcake.

My Rig ;D
Ibanez RG550XX 20th Anniversary
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Crate V50-112 (Modded)
Roland Micro Cube
Lovepedal Purple Plexi 800
Lovepedal Pickle Vibe
Ibanez TS-9
Boss DD-3
Dunlop Crybaby
#3
It depends on the acidity of your sweat, the length of time playing the guitar and many other x factors. Guitars age...its just how it works. Try looking at older white les pauls and checking out what their wear looks like.
http://www.youtube.com/user/RichManofAction

200,000 views and counting!


Quote by Perp8tualMotion
This man gets the big golden popcorn trophy which signifies an exceptionally accurate response.


Gear: Jackson SL2H, DX10DFS, Ibanez Prestige RG, Marshall JCM 2000 DSL
#4
Well, here's the front of Rory Gallagher's 1961 strat;

(Invalid img)

And here's the front of Eric Clapton's composite 1956/1957 strat Blackie, or a replica or something;



I know you have a Les Paul and these are both strats, but I think it illustrates the point fine; Every guitar wears differently depending on conditions, whether it's babied or made to howl, it's owners style of play and it's what the owner's blood type is. Rory had a rare blood type that, for all intents and purposes, made him sweat paint stripper. Eric it would appear doesn't have sweat quite as acidic. It's going to wear. That's just a fact. But how much so depends on how you use it.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 50-54
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 0-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 0-0
#5
IIRC Rory Gallagher's Strat was stolen and left out in a ditch in heavy rain for a few days, which probably contributed a lot to how it looks now.

It depends on your taste. Some people like the aged look of vintage guitars which is why we have all these new relic'd, purposefully aged guitars these days. Some people don't like them, it's up to you, but your guitar's going to age whether you like it or not!
Gibson SG Diablo . Fender Cali Series Strat . Modded Epi Firebird . Seagull 25th Anniv. CW
Korg Pitchblack > Vox V847 >
Big Muff π TW >
Boss OC-3 > Memory Boy
Vox AD50VT
#7
Does it have Laquer finish? if yes it will never technically dry, and over time sinks into the guitar making its finish muck up
Quote by daytripper75
This man speaks the truth.
#8
Quote by Vlasco
This also hugely depends on the type of finish.


+1

I wish there was a site that listed the finish used on all modles of guitars.
My Ibanez's finish is a smooth satin, but in certain areas [where my arm/body normally touch the guitar] it has turned shiny and sticky. Does this mean it has a Nitro finish? Or is it a urethane finish that is changing its external texture?
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
Last edited by Simsimius at Sep 3, 2009,
#9
Quote by Yerjam
IIRC Rory Gallagher's Strat was stolen and left out in a ditch in heavy rain for a few days, which probably contributed a lot to how it looks now.

It depends on your taste. Some people like the aged look of vintage guitars which is why we have all these new relic'd, purposefully aged guitars these days. Some people don't like them, it's up to you, but your guitar's going to age whether you like it or not!

I thought it was like two weeks

But yeah, I normally don't see Les Pauls wearing down as much as Strats. Although, if you look at Gabel's Les Paul Studio, that's worn down quite a lot. So yeah. Have a look at his, and that's how I'm guessing it will wear.
Cam Sampbell's my hero
#10
The thick poly used on an epi will take alot more to wear down than lacquer will. And poly also will resist your skin chemistry alot more.
#11
Quote by Lil Macker
I thought it was like two weeks

But yeah, I normally don't see Les Pauls wearing down as much as Strats. Although, if you look at Gabel's Les Paul Studio, that's worn down quite a lot. So yeah. Have a look at his, and that's how I'm guessing it will wear.


Yeah, though it was quite worn when I got it (the owner before me had been playing it with a spike bracelet...)
This is what it looked back then:


And here it is now:


However you can see that it's been worn quite a bit, the exposed part on the top is much larger and more paint has come off the sides.
Quote by stratman_13
It's okay Gabel. You kick ass.



18watter video demo

My band

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2009
#12
Quote by Simsimius
+1

I wish there was a site that listed the finish used on all modles of guitars.
My Ibanez's finish is a smooth satin, but in certain areas [where my arm/body normally touch the guitar] it has turned shiny and sticky. Does this mean it has a Nitro finish? Or is it a urethane finish that is changing its external texture?


Satin and Nitro are different things. Last I checked, ibanezes don't use Nitro. They use poly or another type of finish. Nitro is used on about 3 strats (The ones that say nitro usually have a poly finish under it, which doesn't make it a true nitro finish.) Most of the more expensive Gibson LPs, like the historic series and others of that nature, use nitro finish. It's more expensive to use and is very temperature sensitive. Poly is a very thick finish that's more like a plastic. Very durable and is cheaper to put onto guitars and is found on many many guitars. Some neck finishes are in satin or tung oil (I think that's the name).

And since you were asking for a site with a list of finishes for guitars, I came across this:
http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/FinishOverview.htm
#13
I know poly chips off and scratches after being abused for a little while, but does it also begin to fade?

I think it's just some rubbing wear, but on one wing on my guitar is beginning to turn greyish. I haven't tried cleaning it off or anything. I don't even wipe the smudges off my guitar. I like the idea of relicing, and I've been told the fingerprints and smudges will eventually stain the guitar. Is that true, too?
#14
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
I know poly chips off and scratches after being abused for a little while, but does it also begin to fade?

I think it's just some rubbing wear, but on one wing on my guitar is beginning to turn greyish. I haven't tried cleaning it off or anything. I don't even wipe the smudges off my guitar. I like the idea of relicing, and I've been told the fingerprints and smudges will eventually stain the guitar. Is that true, too?


I don't really think it's true with poly. I'm sure the paint itself ages and any chips and stuff that occurs will help with relicing. However, most old guitars (For instance Rory's strat, any 50s strats) used nitro, which let relicing and smudges and everything occur a bit faster.

Poly is REALLY thick. I stripped a friend's mexi strat and found the finish to be almost half an inch thick if not more.
#15
Then my paint must not be poly. The finish on my guitar only appears to be a few millimeters thick...
#16
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Then my paint must not be poly. The finish on my guitar only appears to be a few millimeters thick...


Different companies add different amounts of finish. I've seen heavy poly finishes, thin poly finishes. Just like I've seen thin nitro finishes, and thick nitro finishes. Just depends on whose doing the finish.
#17
Yeah last time I brought my guitar to a shop I got yelled at for a few dings. All I said was and? I play the guitar, I don't cuddle with it in it's case. Your lp is gonna be unique, no 2 guitars naturally wear the same.
Quote by 23:50 inbleach
can't i just eat the fucking cactus?

Quote by WildChicken
Go suck a cat westdyolf!

Quote by Cat Of Pain
So, West...

I hear you'll suck my cat...

Ill suck your cat
PEACE LOVE PANCAKES
call me zach

chocolate chip pancakes!
#19
under the Poly finish, I remember reading on the Gibson website or something like that, it allows the guitar's body to 'breathe' if you catch my drift.

It's either the Poly or Nitro finish.
Quote by silhouettica
Oh, DON'T use a knife. It cuts through your strings. I did that once, thinking, its the Low E, its invincible. Turns out, its not...

Quote by Kensai
Awesome
#20
Quote by Jfsmith
I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio and the finish is white and the spot where I rest my hand is turning pink. So, what can I expect my finish to look like in the future?



Gear:

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard
- Vox VT-20+


#21
every guitar i have has got scratches and dings and chips. I play them. Alot. I put a big gash on the headstock of my gretsch not 2 weeks after i bought it. It's all part of it, I like mine to have battle scars.
#22
Quote by Angus_Junior35
under the Poly finish, I remember reading on the Gibson website or something like that, it allows the guitar's body to 'breathe' if you catch my drift.

It's either the Poly or Nitro finish.


It's nitro. A lot of tone freaks and guitar builders agree with it too. Poly is basically plastic. Nitro if I recall was actually used on cars or something.
#23
I have the same guitar.
but mine is more a browny pink (mushroom pink?)

It's acceptable for nitro finish to do this with sweat, personally i like worn guitars.
But to slow the process i've just for a squirt bottle of fender mist & wipe clean and an old tshirt, Wipe it down every few days or so.

Maybe you should have research nitro finishes before you went out and bought a $1500 guitar?
I love white guitars!
#24
Quote by FallsDownStairs
Satin and Nitro are different things. Last I checked, ibanezes don't use Nitro. They use poly or another type of finish. Nitro is used on about 3 strats (The ones that say nitro usually have a poly finish under it, which doesn't make it a true nitro finish.) Most of the more expensive Gibson LPs, like the historic series and others of that nature, use nitro finish. It's more expensive to use and is very temperature sensitive. Poly is a very thick finish that's more like a plastic. Very durable and is cheaper to put onto guitars and is found on many many guitars. Some neck finishes are in satin or tung oil (I think that's the name).

And since you were asking for a site with a list of finishes for guitars, I came across this:
http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/FinishOverview.htm


I know, nitro and poly are the materials, and satin and gloss is how they look/feel.
My Ibby's finish is satin, but nitro or poly? I thought it was poly as I'd doubt Ibby would use Nitro, but does poly react in that way so quickly?
I've had my ibby for two years, and the finish where my body is in contact has changed texture from a non-reflective clear satin texture, to a more reflective 'sticky' glossy texture.
Even the back of the neck where my hand normally is when playing has gone sticky, but the back of the headstock hasn't changed [as my hands don't go there ]
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#25
Quote by Simsimius
I know, nitro and poly are the materials, and satin and gloss is how they look/feel.
My Ibby's finish is satin, but nitro or poly? I thought it was poly as I'd doubt Ibby would use Nitro, but does poly react in that way so quickly?
I've had my ibby for two years, and the finish where my body is in contact has changed texture from a non-reflective clear satin texture, to a more reflective 'sticky' glossy texture.
Even the back of the neck where my hand normally is when playing has gone sticky, but the back of the headstock hasn't changed [as my hands don't go there ]


Actually, Satin and gloss are materials along with Nitro and Poly if I recall. Nitro and polly don't use gloss or satin finishes on top of it unless stated otherwise. It depends on how thin the poly finish is for it to react so fast. Also depends on other variables, as in how often you're playing, if you're gigging (temperature changes and other things can contribute to wearing on a guitar), and stuff of that nature.

Ibbys don't use nitro, I don't think I've ever seen one use nitro unless it was a custom made one. The neck, however, might be another story. I know a lot of necks use tung oil (I think thats the name) finishes or nitro on some strats (Remember, as far as I know, only 3 production strats use true nitro finishes). Those are the only neck finishes I know of that produce a 'sticky' feeling after a while. However, with the nitro finish on necks, It's been known to go away after playing a few times. Not sure about the others. If the neck is painted on the back to match the color (like some PRS's, gibsons, and others are), then that can also contribute to the stickyness.
#26
Quote by FallsDownStairs
Actually, Satin and gloss are materials along with Nitro and Poly if I recall. Nitro and polly don't use gloss or satin finishes on top of it unless stated otherwise. It depends on how thin the poly finish is for it to react so fast. Also depends on other variables, as in how often you're playing, if you're gigging (temperature changes and other things can contribute to wearing on a guitar), and stuff of that nature.


Ibbys don't use nitro, I don't think I've ever seen one use nitro unless it was a custom made one. The neck, however, might be another story. I know a lot of necks use tung oil (I think thats the name) finishes or nitro on some strats (Remember, as far as I know, only 3 production strats use true nitro finishes). Those are the only neck finishes I know of that produce a 'sticky' feeling after a while. However, with the nitro finish on necks, It's been known to go away after playing a few times. Not sure about the others. If the neck is painted on the back to match the color (like some PRS's, gibsons, and others are), then that can also contribute to the stickyness.



You learn something new all the time [about gloss/satin]

So, the neck may be nitro or tung oil? But the body is not nitro?
I may need to read up more on Tung Oil, as if that has the same response my Ibby's finish has [on both body and neck], then that has solved the mystery.
The neck isn't painted, it just a clear finish that used to be smooth [on both body and neck].
The finish on the body can easily be dented - so much so that my finger nail, or even my pick, can easily cause a permanent scratch [and without much pressure at all.] Heck, the back of my guitar has a bunch of marks caused by my nails . The pores of the wood are also easily visible.

EDIT: After reading the previous link you sent me, I'm pretty sure Tung Oil may be used on both body andneck, as it's the only non-nitro that explains what happens.

Thanks
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
Last edited by Simsimius at Sep 4, 2009,