#2
no! first,there is no such thing as E#,its just F.
and F is certainly not Eb,they are different notes.
#3
Quote by becker89
no! first,there is no such thing as E#,its just F.
and F is certainly not Eb,they are different notes.


Incorrect, E# does exist, it's just not in common usage.

And no, TS, they are exact opposites.
Quote by dudetheman
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#4
A flat (b) sign lowers the note by a half step (also called a semi-tone, equivalent to one fret on your guitar)

A sharp (#) sign raises the note by a half step

So Eb is a half step lower than E, and E# is a half step higher than E

E# is enharmonic to F - which means they are different names for the same pitch of note. You'd choose the name depending on the context.
#5
okay so E# does exist,but honestly i dont see the point of its existance.
i guess its used in a specific matter,which this terminology is needed.
#6
Quote by becker89
okay so E# does exist,but honestly i dont see the point of its existance.
i guess its used in a specific matter,which this terminology is needed.
Indeed, one of the basic rules is that each letter should only exist once in a scale.

Case in point, the key of F# major. The letter F is already used, and yet clearly the major 7th must be the same pitch as F. So we need to call it E#. What we don't want is to have both F and F# in the key at the same time.
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Last edited by Grep at Sep 3, 2009,
#7
Quote by Grep
Indeed, one of the basic rules is that each letter should only exist once in a scale.

Case in point, the key of F#. The letter F is already used, and yet clearly the major 7th must be the same pitch as F. So we need to call it E#. What we don't want is to have both F and F# in the key at the same time.



He said exactly what I was thinking... same example.... everything.
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#8
Quote by becker89
okay so E# does exist,but honestly i dont see the point of its existance.
i guess its used in a specific matter,which this terminology is needed.
Eg:

F# minor is

F#, G#, A, B, C#, D, E, F#

F# harmonic minor has a raised 7th:

F#, G#, A, B, C#, D, E#, F#
#11
Quote by goncalocobain
ok, thanks everyone

That was my doubt, because my tuner as this sign : '#' but not 'b'.
Thats probably because you are tuning to E, and your tuner is telling you if you are too high or too low by using b and # signs
#12
Yup Yup

Without the enharmonic stuff, writing music would become a pain in the ass, and possibly impossible.

On a staff of music, every line represents a note, as well as in between the lines.

They always stay the same.

So if you had for example G and G# in a scale, you have a paradox.

If you put a Sharp in front of the G note line, then then all the G's on that line becomes sharp, but then you can't notate a G any more.

So theoretically speaking, you would then for example have to notate every F# note with an extra sharp, but then key signatures wouldn't make sense anymore.

etc. etc.

To keep it short, without this subtle difference, a lot of music theory would becoming confusing or impossible to work with.

Music theory has been around for centuries, trust me when I say there's a lot of thought in it.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 4, 2009,
#14
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Yup Yup

Without the enharmonic stuff, writing music would become a pain in the ass, and possibly impossible.

On a staff of music, every line represents a note, as well as in between the lines.

They always stay the same.

So if you had for example G and G# in a scale, you have a paradox.

If you put a Sharp in front of the G note line, then then all the G's on that line becomes sharp, but then you can't notate a G any more.

So theoretically speaking, you would then for example have to notate every F# note with an extra sharp, but then key signatures wouldn't make sense anymore.

etc. etc.

To keep it short, without this subtle difference, a lot of music theory would becoming confusing or impossible to work with.

Music theory has been around for centuries, trust me when I say there's a lot of thought in it.


Well, yes you can, it would just be a huge pain in the ass. That's what natural signs are for.
Quote by dudetheman
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