#1
Hey everyone, Im considering too take up drumming. I've been doing research about it and just watching inspiring drummers that want me to start playing, besides I want to help learn beats and counting rhythms a lot better too which can help in my guitar playing. But when it comes to buying a drum kit, I dont really have the space to by a acoustic or possibly an electric drum kit. But I have heard about drum pads, and I wanted to know if these are great for drumming novice? And also give any other advices for practicing drumming too (by they way, for now Im probably going to need something that can drive the neighbors crazy too or my family)

Thanks a lot everyone
#2
An electric kit would be your best bet when it comes to small spaces.

I'd try a used one from Craigslist or Ebay.
#3
Definately don't start on practice pads, an acoustic kit would be ideal but an electric kit will suffice if space and noise is an issue.
As far as practicing is concerned, start simple. The "Billie Jean" beat is probably the most rudimentary beat, so start with that. Just work on keeping yourself consistent and in time, a metronome will help immensely, and some electric kits, like mine, have them built in, but if not buy one.
Once you get the basics, just listen to simple pop/rock songs that you already know, and try and put a simple beat to them. Don't try and start with metal, indie or punk, as the drum beats are usually quite difficult/fast. Classic rock and pop are the way to go when you first start.
#4
Mastodon have great beginner songs.

On a side note I just bought a Sabian Vault Ride today
#5
Electric drums come by as pretty expensive. Even for a small 5 piece kit with 2 cymbals. Getting it used is probably the best thing to do.

As for drum pads there are different types. Like regular pads of rubber which are used to practice rudimentary things on, or USB drums pads which are self-explanatory....
#6
Quote by SilentHeaven109
Definately don't start on practice pads, an acoustic kit would be ideal but an electric kit will suffice if space and noise is an issue.
As far as practicing is concerned, start simple. The "Billie Jean" beat is probably the most rudimentary beat, so start with that. Just work on keeping yourself consistent and in time, a metronome will help immensely, and some electric kits, like mine, have them built in, but if not buy one.
Once you get the basics, just listen to simple pop/rock songs that you already know, and try and put a simple beat to them. Don't try and start with metal, indie or punk, as the drum beats are usually quite difficult/fast. Classic rock and pop are the way to go when you first start.


Why shouldnt you start learning drumming on practice pads? And also what about electronic drum kits, how are the kick drums compared to a regular acoustic kit?
#7
Quote by swordsman14
Why shouldnt you start learning drumming on practice pads?


Well, for one they only help you with your hands, you also need to use your feet as well, and they also don't feel like drums at all, so when you make the leap to a full kit, which you will obviously need to do, then it'll take time to adjust. They're fine for warming up before a gig, but learning on them won't help, you could just as easily do the same thing with your mattress.
Trust me, full kit is the way if you're serious about learning, electric or acoustic.

EDIT: The thing about kick pads: I have found that they are fairly similar to real drums, not quite as responsive and "springy" but it's a minor difference. If you have the money, get a mesh head kick pad, they feel almost the same as real kick drums, at least to me.
Last edited by SilentHeaven109 at Sep 3, 2009,
#8
I have a Roland six pad all in one unit that was really cheap with HH, toms and snare, and a Pearl real drum pedal hitting a firm cardboard box, that can be mic'd. Amazingly the box sounds great and the EQ'ing in cubase can get it really natural sounding. My drumming is getting pretty good now after 1 year. Less than $300 total and the pedal is a good one. It also takes no space and you can adjust the volume.
#9
Quote by SilentHeaven109
Well, for one they only help you with your hands, you also need to use your feet as well, and they also don't feel like drums at all, so when you make the leap to a full kit, which you will obviously need to do, then it'll take time to adjust. They're fine for warming up before a gig, but learning on them won't help, you could just as easily do the same thing with your mattress.
Trust me, full kit is the way if you're serious about learning, electric or acoustic.

EDIT: The thing about kick pads: I have found that they are fairly similar to real drums, not quite as responsive and "springy" but it's a minor difference. If you have the money, get a mesh head kick pad, they feel almost the same as real kick drums, at least to me.


Considering that fact that as I progress with my drumming when I start, would an electric drum kit be great if Im going to be doing blastbeats and gravity blasts just to name a few techniques? And especially being compared to an acoustic kit soundwise and usability?
#10
Quote by swordsman14
Hey everyone, Im considering too take up drumming. I've been doing research about it and just watching inspiring drummers that want me to start playing, besides I want to help learn beats and counting rhythms a lot better too which can help in my guitar playing. But when it comes to buying a drum kit, I dont really have the space to by a acoustic or possibly an electric drum kit. But I have heard about drum pads, and I wanted to know if these are great for drumming novice? And also give any other advices for practicing drumming too (by they way, for now Im probably going to need something that can drive the neighbors crazy too or my family)

Thanks a lot everyone


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Too-also, an excess, or along with.
I agree with you too."

Two-the second number in the deca-counting system. Also expressed by the symbol "2"


If you can't afford a drum/nowhere to put it/play it, then don't bother.
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#11
Quote by swordsman14
Considering that fact that as I progress with my drumming when I start, would an electric drum kit be great if Im going to be doing blastbeats and gravity blasts just to name a few techniques? And especially being compared to an acoustic kit soundwise and usability?


I'm not the best blaster in the world, but I can do it decently on both electric and acoustic. An acoustic kit is better for speed playing, but you won't be playing with any speed for a while yet, so this doesn't matter at the moment.
If you're looking to blast on an electric, once you get better of course, get a mesh head snare, as I can blast way faster on my schools mesh head kit than I can on my rubber head kit.

One thing I will say, don't try and start with blasting. Get the basics down first, start with simple beats and fills. Blasting is an advanced technique.
#12
pshhh...blastbeating...you're better off investing in a drum machine...
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#13
invest in a drum machine anyway. or at least download a software one. just any old simple step sequencer will do but trust me, it REALLY helps in being able to break down beats which makes them far simpler to learn. an electric kit will do fine for seeing if you really are built for drumming (some people simply cant do it), and my TD9 (mesh hardware essential) is invaluable for speedy recording and uber late night practicing but its not the same as a real kit. if you stick it out for long enough you'll find yourself GASing for some real cymbals or a proper snare in no time anyway.

also PRACTICE YOUR ****ING RUDIMENTS. to a metronome if possible. maybe even on a practice pad (great little things but by no means a substitute for a real drum). yes, it can be boring paradiddling for hours on end (to some, personally i kind of enjoy that zen feeling when you fall into the zone at 300bpm and it becomes easy) but it really helps coordination.

its also good to do things like really strip back to hi hat, kick crash and snare. **** tomtoms, trying to do crazy fills right away will just confuse you, and having a good solid interesting groove is way more useful than flashy fills all over the place. crazy fills all over the place might impress people who dont know anything about drumming, but if you cant keep rock solid time and groove, you are pretty much useless.
i mean this in the least patronising way, but learn to count and play solidly and steadily before attempting techniques like blasts, or you will just fail. remember, you have to be able to keep time and be the backbone for the rest of the band. sad fact is that while listeners dont really pay a great deal of attention to the what the drummer is really doing, other members get tired very quickly if you are dropping beats and wavering in tempo.

take things slow but most of all have fun.

and for the love of god, dont get a double kick pedal until you are 100% sure you cant physically play your single kick any faster or more consistently. people do amazing things with a single kick, but a lot of people do very lazy things with a double.
--------------------i'm definitely the alphaest male here--------------------
#14
learn your rudiments and sticking technique first. It isn't much fun, but it will help you with your drumming immensely. After that learn a basic rock beat work on timing with that for a while. Find songs that are in 4/4 at a reasonable tempo and play the rock beat along with them, it doesn't matter if the drums on the song are doing something different, it will help your timing.
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