#1
so if this is the pentatonic scale in the key of C major
e---------------------------8-11-
b----------------------8-11------
g-----------------8-10-----------
D------------8-10----------------
A-------8-10---------------------
E--8-11--------------------------


what would the pentatonic scale be in the scale of C major sharp (example)
e---------------------------9-12-
b----------------------9-12------
g-----------------9-11-----------
D------------911----------------
A-------9-11---------------------
E--9-12--------------------------

??????

does the scale just go up a fret for the next key????
#3
Yes. You can transpose a scale from C to C# by going a half step, on fret up.
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#4
Yes, going up a fret changes to key to a semitone higher. Just for reference, it's called C sharp major, not C major sharp. Going up another fret would take you to D major.
#6
he has it right. It can start on the 5th fret but on the A string. He is doing this from the Low E
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#7
You can move that shape anywhere up and down the neck to change the key, so if you moved it to the 5th fret from the 8th (C) it would make it an A minor pentatonic.
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#8
The first example is the C minor pentatonic scale or the D# major. The second is the C# minor/E major pentatonic.

Using that pattern, the first note is the minor key. The second is the major key.
#9
Quote by joey arce
he has it right. It can start on the 5th fret but on the A string. He is doing this from the Low E



If it started on the fifth fret of the A string, wouldn't that be Dmi Pentatonic?

Assuming that the fifth fret A string was your root.
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#10
Quote by mashizz
c major starts on the 5th fret

a C major can't start on a A.
If you would begin from A , you would play A minor i think.
Wich is in the same key as C.

Am i right?
#11
A minor is C majors relative minor, which mean they consist of the same notes. They are not the same key though.
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#12
Quote by toine
a C major can't start on a A.
If you would begin from A , you would play A minor i think.
Wich is in the same key as C.

Am i right?


No. A minor is not equal to C major. they have the same notes but they resolve to a different tonic and therefore they are not the same.

When you are playing in C major, you can actually use the 5-8 pentatonic box, since it's an A minor pentatonic scale BUT you're playing in C major, in other words you would have to resolve to C with your solo.

They contain the same notes.
#13
It depends what you use as the root note.

example: Low E string 8-11 fret.

If you use the C (8th fret) as the root note. Then it would be a C minor pentatonic.
If you use the Eb as the root note. Then it would be Eb major pentatonic.

Yes, keys are like changing pitch...You're changing the pitch of the entire parent scale.
If you shuffle/slide (entire pattern) the root note 8th fret to 5th fret, then it would A minor
pentatonic.

There's 5 notes in pentatonic scale.

Major pentatonic scale= 1,2,3,5,6
Minor pentatonic scale= 1,-3,4,5,-7

No, you don't always have to start playing a scale from the root note or resolve to it. That's why it sounds the same to you because Amin is the relative of Cmaj.
In other words they have the same notes.

However the Cmaj chord and Amin chord have different arpeggios.

If you break it down and study theory a little bit. It'll help you sound
not quirky or hit N miss, by playing random notes from a box pattern
and hope you'll sound okay.
There's noting wrong with playing in the box to start.
You have to start somewhere..However learn to identify the root notes
at least. Then expand on that.

Train your ears to help you distinguish different scales.
Last edited by 12notes at Sep 4, 2009,