#1
Mainly in Metal type music.

Ive started Learning chords and I don't think that many metal bands use normal chords like a C major or a E minor, I just see alot of power chords.

Can someone tell me how to make chords (CM, Em, etc.) that work well with metal style playing.
#2
Congrats, you've discovered the thing that makes metal metal.

In all seriousness, they don't really have much of an application outside of some of the cleaner parts of metal. If any of the chords have tonality (and this is just a guess here, I'm no metal player) it might just come come from being extended by the vocals.
#3
They don 't really work that well in most types of metal. The reason you usually see power chords is because power chords are neutral, and neither major nor minor. When distortion is applied to power chords it also adds harmonics to the sound which gives it that powerful sound.
#4
Strumming open chords will hardly ever work in metal, you could write a chord progression using open chords and play the corresponding power chords to make them more metal.
You could arpeggiate open minor chords, to give an Opeth type sound, I have found. Besides that I don't know what to suggest, power chords are far more common in metal than open chords.
#5
Generally when playing open chords or even bar chords with distortion you get a nice big jumbled up mess. Playing the power chord as said above will work better when using distortion.
#8
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Dyad = power chord.


I though a Dyan was the Root and the minor 3rd. Not the Root and 5th.
#9
Quote by Blckspawn
I though a Dyan was the Root and the minor 3rd. Not the Root and 5th.
Just two notes
#10
Quote by Blckspawn
I though a Dyan was the Root and the minor 3rd. Not the Root and 5th.


A dyad is just 2 notes.
#11
Chords in metal exist all the time. There are rarely more than two notes played on one guitar at a time, but if you look at all the instruments there's usually more than just root and fifth present.

TS, you should try playing two notes at a time. m3, M3, P4, d5, P5, m6, and M6 all work just fine with distortion on. Keep your voicings open, and let the bassist, singer and other guitarist handle other chord tones.
#12
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Dyad = power chord.


You've got that backwards.

Powerchords are not the only kind of dyad out there, thus, Powerchord = Dyad
#13
Quote by icronic
You've got that backwards.

Powerchords are not the only kind of dyad out there, thus, Powerchord = Dyad


I see it as the same thing but okay if order matters that much :P