#2
Quote by Blckspawn
A C major Dyad is C and E right?

the Root and the minor 3rd.


That's a major third.
#4
D is a major 2nd, E is a major 3rd. A dyad is a set of 2 notes. A power chord is a dyad.
#5
A dyad isn't really 'proper' terminology. It means a two note chord, which is oxymoronic as a three notes must be played together to constitute a chord. Often it just means a double stop, which is when two notes are played at the same time. If you played just C and E, that would imply C major, which is a triad. I would discourage the use of the word dyad.
#6
Quote by Blckspawn
So it would be a C and D?


C and E are correct for a major third interval. If you want a minor third interval you should lower it by a half step so E would be Eb (E flat). C and Eb is a minor third interval.

Major third: C and E
Minor third: C and Eb
#7
C and E would be a dyad, but not a C major dyad, because C major would really imply the C major triad. The C and E dyad could be a part of two triads (C major and A minor) and several seventh and ninth chords, so any harmonic function you attribute to a dyad is entirely dependant upon context. I'd be careful about the use of the word dyad: I very rarely use the term in my analyses.
#9
A dyad is much better refered to as an interval. Dyads (diads?) aren't real chords because they only have two notes and almost always (at least in tonal music) imply full chords, like a song with power chords will imply the thirds.

With this considered it would be much more conventional and applicable to refer to C and E as a major third interval and the same with any interval.
#10
I'm trying to figure out some other chords I can do OTHER than powerchords in a metal song.

C Major Diad/Dyad is C and E. C Major Triad is a C, E, G. Right?

So a C minor Dyad/Diad is C and Eb. C Minor Triad is a C, Eb, G. Right?
#11
Quote by Blckspawn
I'm trying to figure out some other chords I can do OTHER than powerchords in a metal song.

C Major Diad/Dyad is C and E. C Major Triad is a C, E, G. Right?

So a C minor Dyad/Diad is C and Eb. C Minor Triad is a C, Eb, G. Right?


As I said, C E is a dyad which could be a part of C major and A minor triads, as well as various other sevenths and ninths. Depending on how you use it, its function will change. If you use that dyad in place of a C major chord it will imply C major, and depending on how you go about it, it could imply A minor if you use it instead of C major. If you just use that dyad, it's unlikely to sound like a seventh or ninth chord, but I suppose you might be able to if you're clever about it.

The "c minor dyad" that you give could easily imply C minor, Ab major, F dominant 7th and a diminished 7th on F#. It's all about the context that you use it in: how you prepare towards the dyad, and what happens after.
#12
I would also like to discourage the use of the word "dyad/diad". As far as i'm aware it's not proper music terminology (in british english at least) it's derived from triad (tri = 3, di = 2) put seems to be pretty made up. You certainly wouldn't call 4 notes a "quadad" for example.

^^ yes that seems to be correct.
Why would you stick purely to 2 note "chords" playing metal? you could move away from 2 note "chords" entirely and start playing full chords and adding embellishments. IMO the b6 is under used especially when compared to power chords and b5's
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#13
Quote by doive
I would also like to discourage the use of the word "dyad/diad". As far as i'm aware it's not proper music terminology (in british english at least) it's derived from triad (tri = 3, di = 2) put seems to be pretty made up. You certainly wouldn't call 4 notes a "quadad" for example.

^^ yes that seems to be correct.
Why would you stick purely to 2 note "chords" playing metal? you could move away from 2 note "chords" entirely and start playing full chords and adding embellishments. IMO the b6 is under used especially when compared to power chords and b5's


SO how about Ditone/Tritone?

anyways, I can't play full chords with distortion cause it sounds really bad.
#14
Quote by doive
IMO the b6 is under used especially when compared to power chords and b5's


+1

Yes! For me, the b6 implies a major chord (when played as an interval)- I.E. B and G, played together, to me sound like a Gmaj. The great part being that they don't sound "un-metal", in that they still sound like powerchords, but you get the major tonality.
#15
Quote by doive
I would also like to discourage the use of the word "dyad/diad". As far as i'm aware it's not proper music terminology (in british english at least) it's derived from triad (tri = 3, di = 2) put seems to be pretty made up. You certainly wouldn't call 4 notes a "quadad" for example.


Dyad is perfectly correct (NB: it is dyad, not diad). A four note chord is a tetrad.
These terms are most often than not used in coincidence with triadic harmony: they're more often than not used in atonal/quartal harmonies. This can get confusing, as when you want to use a term for a three note chord in a non-tonal context, "triad" carries unwanted connotations.

However, this is purely technical knowledge, and most people would just say "three/four note chord". Dyad can be useful if you're just talking about two voices, when the term "chord" would be inappropriate.

Quote by Blckspawn
SO how about Ditone/Tritone?

anyways, I can't play full chords with distortion cause it sounds really bad.


A tritone refers to an interval where there are three whole tones in between the two notes i.e. an augmented fourth. Technically a diminished 5th isn't actually a tritone, as there are two whole tones and two semitones between the notes, but it's enharmonic with an augmented fourth and has the same harmonic properties (the inversion of an augmented fourth is a diminished 5th).
A ditone doesn't exist as a term, but you can work out what it would be based on the definition of a tritone.
Last edited by National_Anthem at Sep 4, 2009,
#16
^that is my new thing for today thank you mr anthem.
We do need to change our national anthem though, it is truly awful. That is my main argument for republicanism
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#17
Quote by doive
^that is my new thing for today thank you mr anthem.
We do need to change our national anthem though, it is truly awful. That is my main argument for republicanism


Oh, that's only because I was listening to Radiohead as I signed up, and I couldn't think of a better username. It's terrible really.
#18
at least you're not SlAsH_LoVeR999. generic names like that bother me....

i always wonder how people would pronounce my username if they had to say it. i kinda dislike it really. at least it's short to type in login boxes :p
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#20
Quote by doive
at least you're not SlAsH_LoVeR999. generic names like that bother me....

i always wonder how people would pronounce my username if they had to say it. i kinda dislike it really. at least it's short to type in login boxes :p


What is your username from? Oh and to me it says "Doyv" :P
#21
not from anywhere really - just kinda occured to me - i won't ruin it for you with my/the "real" pronounciation :p
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#22
Quote by doive
not from anywhere really - just kinda occured to me - i won't ruin it for you with my/the "real" pronounciation :p


It is a correct French word. Its pronounced like "dwah-ve".
#23
Quote by doive
I would also like to discourage the use of the word "dyad/diad". As far as i'm aware it's not proper music terminology (in british english at least) it's derived from triad (tri = 3, di = 2) put seems to be pretty made up. You certainly wouldn't call 4 notes a "quadad" for example.

^^ yes that seems to be correct.
Why would you stick purely to 2 note "chords" playing metal? you could move away from 2 note "chords" entirely and start playing full chords and adding embellishments. IMO the b6 is under used especially when compared to power chords and b5's


I've never bothered to even try a b6.. (that would be a minor 6th? Correct? :x..) and I decided to play with it a bit.

I've got to say.

Thank you. Discover something new to play with every time I come onto this site.




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#24
Quote by National_Anthem
Whenever I say it in my head, I pronounce it as if it were French. Sounds classy!

when I read that I thought doov-wah.
and then below was dwah-ve.
doov-wah sounds better

In my head I pronounce it doy-v (doy rhymes with toy)