#1
I've noticed that even though I've made my tracks as loud as I can in Protools, when I burn them to a CD, there's still a noticable decrease in volume when compared to normal CDs. I've mastered the tracks as loud as I can, so how do I get that extra boost in volume that regular CDs only seem to achieve?
#2
Quote by gallagher2006
I've noticed that even though I've made my tracks as loud as I can in Protools, when I burn them to a CD, there's still a noticable decrease in volume when compared to normal CDs. I've mastered the tracks as loud as I can, so how do I get that extra boost in volume that regular CDs only seem to achieve?

well it usually happens in the mastering process. a technique that could make your mix louder would be a master limiter. dont use it too much tho, or your song will just be one dynamic.
#3
Quote by gallagher2006
I've mastered the tracks as loud as I can, so how do I get that extra boost in volume that regular CDs only seem to achieve?


What was you effects chain for the mastering?
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#4
I'm guessing you're not using a multi-band compressor on your master. That and multi-tracking is what makes CDs sound so full and loud.
#5
Quote by eXperiment63
I'm guessing you're not using a multi-band compressor on your master. That and multi-tracking is what makes CDs sound so full and loud.


Say what now? Multi-tracking makes a recording loud? Please explain.
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#6
Quote by ebon00
Say what now? Multi-tracking makes a recording loud? Please explain.

I don't know what eXperiment63 means by that. It makes no sense to me. Either what he meant to say came out wrong, or he doesn't know what he's talking about. Maybe he can clarify.

On a side note, I think everyone would be better off it they were a lot less concerned with commercial volume levels. Just my opinion as a concerned soldier in the loudness war.
#7
Quote by ebon00
What was you effects chain for the mastering?


EQ to take off a bit of the brightness, Multi Band compressor, and then a hard limiter set in about the middle.

It's as loud as I could get them in the program.
#9
Quote by gallagher2006
EQ to take off a bit of the brightness, Multi Band compressor, and then a hard limiter set in about the middle.

It's as loud as I could get them in the program.


Far from it I'd say. You can come close to CD-level volume by just mastering in ProTools, if that's your only goal, but you need the right plugins and the right workflow. First off, bus compression and mixing in stems is your new best friend. Adding some minor compression to a bus where you route the bass and drums and another bus where you have guitars, one where you have all vocals etc., will allow you to raise the volume a bit while adding some cohesion to the mix and not draining the dynamics. Then you slap a transparent limiter on the master, I recommend Massey's L2007, in the first slot. Keep the gain reduction under 3dB. EQ and add whatever compression you want after that, if you mixed well and used the stem tip above you wouldn't need a multiband compressor. If I want something to beef up a little more I'll add the Oxford Inflator set to about 50%. After that add another limiter with the same setting as the first one. If your mix is good you'll get plenty of loudness out of this setup without severely damaging your dynamic range or causing distorsion.

Post your finished master so we can hear what kind of results you've been getting. If you also post a simple mix bounce (i.e. no mastering plugins on the master) I'll run it through my standard setup and see if I can't get it louder.

I would like to add that I'm not a fan of loud for loudness' sake. This post is more about helping the OP get more out of his ProTools setup.
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- Huey Lewis & the News
#10
Take the master EQ and multiband compressor off the master bus. They aren't necessary unless your mixing like a 'tard.

All you should need is a limiter (or a compressor with a ratio of over 50:1, same difference).

I support loudness to a point. Louder sounds better (without clipping/distortion) and that's not just my opinion. It's everybody's, excluding very few, who also tend to be the very same people that can hear the difference between 44.1khz and 88.2khz.
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#12
Quote by CatharsisStudio
ROFLROFLROFL

"who also tend to be the very same people that can hear the difference between 44.1khz and 88.2khz."


oh man i just died laughing

im slightly confused. i know the difference between 24 bit and 16 bit, hell i can even hear it (and im in no way an audiophile) but is there a huge difference between 44.1khz and 88.2khz?
#13
It's as loud as I can get it on the PC, it matches the volume on all my artist MP3s.

It's when I burn it to a CD that the volume is lost.
#14
Quote by gallagher2006
It's as loud as I can get it on the PC, it matches the volume on all my artist MP3s.

It's when I burn it to a CD that the volume is lost.


OK, then you have some other kind of problem. I don't quite know what might cause something like that but I can only think of a few possible causes. One is that you CD burning program has some kind of built-in volume limiting but I haven't heard of anything like that. The other is that your reference listening through different amps. Say that you listen to your mix via an external soundcard that you use for recording (M-Audio, Digideisgn, whatever) and then using you computer's internal soundcard for the mp3:s you compare it to. Then that might explain the difference.

The easiest way to check this is to burn your song next to one of your reference mp3:s onto a CD and then listen to them on your stereo. If there's a difference you're not comparing them properly; if there isn't it's probably your CD -burning that's screwed up.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

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#15
Quote by ebon00
OK, then you have some other kind of problem. I don't quite know what might cause something like that but I can only think of a few possible causes. One is that you CD burning program has some kind of built-in volume limiting but I haven't heard of anything like that. The other is that your reference listening through different amps. Say that you listen to your mix via an external soundcard that you use for recording (M-Audio, Digideisgn, whatever) and then using you computer's internal soundcard for the mp3:s you compare it to. Then that might explain the difference.

The easiest way to check this is to burn your song next to one of your reference mp3:s onto a CD and then listen to them on your stereo. If there's a difference you're not comparing them properly; if there isn't it's probably your CD -burning that's screwed up.


Right, I'm going to try and burn 2 mp3s to one CD and then listen. I'll post back with my findings
#16
The reference MP3 and my MP3 are both at the same volume, but I have to put the Stereo to 30 instead of the usual 20 to get the same amount of volume

wtf