#1
1. The triads of are major scale is I, III, V if i were to use this formula for the minor scale, it would pick out the triads for the minor scale right? does it also apply to other chord formulas for major scales?

2. For chord progression if i take the progression out of a scale such as CDEFGABC
and lets say i use Cm D E F7 does it still count as a C major scale progression?

3. Last question, for 7th chords, what is the formula with the whole tone and semitones.
and how does 7th chords come about?
example for a minor 7th, would it be the scale of harmonic minor with the seventh note raised by a semitone?
Last edited by DisSatisfaction at Sep 4, 2009,
#2
I can only answer three with confidence, but a 7th chord is just the first, third, fifth, and seventh note of the scale. A minor seventh is the same, but the third and seventh drop a half step.

I'm going to hazard a guess a 2, and say yes, also, but someone with more knowledge can correct me.
#3
Quote by OverUnderOnward
I can only answer three with confidence, but a 7th chord is just the first, third, fifth, and seventh note of the scale. A minor seventh is the same, but the third and seventh drop a half step.

I'm going to hazard a guess a 2, and say yes, also, but someone with more knowledge can correct me.


ohat kind of chord would come out of scales suchs as harmonic minors and melodic minors?

and what i meant for the 7th chord is that the roman numerlas for a major 7th chord is I, III, V, VII, if i apply it to a natural minor scale i will get a minor 7th all the time?
#4
Quote by DisSatisfaction
1. The triads of are major scale is I, III, V if i were to use this formula for the minor scale, it would pick out the triads for the minor scale right? does it also apply to other chord formulas for major scales?

2. For chord progression if i take the progression out of a scale such as CDEFGABC
and lets say i use Cm D E F7 does it still count as a C major scale progression?

3. Last question, for 7th chords, what is the formula with the whole tone and semitones.
and how does 7th chords come about?
example for a minor 7th, would it be the scale of harmonic minor with the seventh note raised by a semitone?

I'm sorry to say but about 99% of things you said were wrong BUT about 99% of them can be corrected here. You may need to check part 2 before that.
#5
Quote by DisSatisfaction
1. The triads of are major scale is I, III, V if i were to use this formula for the minor scale, it would pick out the triads for the minor scale right? does it also apply to other chord formulas for major scales?

2. For chord progression if i take the progression out of a scale such as CDEFGABC
and lets say i use Cm D E F7 does it still count as a C major scale progression?

3. Last question, for 7th chords, what is the formula with the whole tone and semitones.
and how does 7th chords come about?
example for a minor 7th, would it be the scale of harmonic minor with the seventh note raised by a semitone?



i am sorta confused on what your asking

1) you always use the formula's to the major scale and a minor triad is 1 b3 5

this is for comunication to other musicians. we need a base scale

2)well your F7 will may want to pull from the C i don't know usually you would use a Gminor or Gmaj to the Cmin as a resolve.

thats not to ay that the F won't pull that way it is just the dominant 7 F will want to not pull to CM i believe

3) Major 7 - 1 3 5 7
minor 7 1 b3 5 b7
dominant 7 or X7 1 3 5 b7

and i think you are confused generally we use roman numeral to show chords and intervals to scale notes/chords formula's


EDIT: your F7 will strongly want to move to a Bb mjor. your D is gonna throw the minor off as it will want to be diminished there is no E in Cminor there is an Eb and and again the F7...... but i can't say it doesn't work if it sounds good
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Sep 4, 2009,
#6
Quote by DisSatisfaction
1. The triads of are major scale is I, III, V if i were to use this formula for the minor scale, it would pick out the triads for the minor scale right? does it also apply to other chord formulas for major scales?

First, roman numerals are only used to describe chords. The process to get the triads you're talking about is called harmonizing the major scale. You take a note, the third note above that (in the scale) and the third note above that (in the scale). This gives you a triad. Whether it's major, minor, or diminished depends on what note you start on. Yes, this type of harmonizing can be used with any other scale. This really is a 'chord formula'. For extensions, just keep stacking thirds above the fifth (to the seventh, ninth, etc).

2. For chord progression if i take the progression out of a scale such as CDEFGABC
and lets say i use Cm D E F7 does it still count as a C major scale progression?

It all depends on what you resolve to. With those chords, you're not sticking to the C major scale. You have an F# (in the D chord), a G# (in the E chord), and an Eb (in the F7 chord and Cm) that are NOT a part of the C major scale. D(7) is a commonly used chord in a C major progression before a G, because D7 is the dominant of G. And while it isn't diatonically in key, the progression would still be in C major (assuming you resolved back to C sometime after the G). That progression (Cm D E F7) wouldn't really be in C major because none of those chords are contained in C major. But substitutions (such as the one I described above, among MANY others) would not change the key of a chord progression. The progression's key is determined by its tonic (where it resolves to)

3. Last question, for 7th chords, what is the formula with the whole tone and semitones.
and how does 7th chords come about?
example for a minor 7th, would it be the scale of harmonic minor with the seventh note raised by a semitone?

You get 7th chords by stacking thirds (the harmonizing I talked about in the first question). You stack two thirds (diatonically from a scale) and you get a triad. Stack another third on top of that, and you've got a diatonic 7th chord. Stack another, and you've got a diatonic 9th chord, etc. The formula for diatonic 7th chords in the major scale:

maj7: 1 3 5 7
7 (dominant 7): 1 3 5 b7
m7: 1 b3 5 b7
half diminished 7 (m7b5): 1 b3 b5 b7

Maj7 chords are formed by harmonizing (stacking thirds) from the 1st and 4th scale degrees. Dominant 7 (notated as x7) chords are formed by harmonizing from the 5th scale degree. m7 chords are formed by harmonizing from the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th scale degrees. The half-diminished 7 (m7b5) chord is formed by harmonizing the 7th scale degree.


(answers in bold above)

I hope this answers your questions.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Sep 4, 2009,
#7
^ i started reading what you where saying and i all the info i gave him was under the impression he was doing a Cminor progression lol.

Quote by TS
2. For chord progression if i take the progression out of a scale such as CDEFGABC
and lets say i use Cm D E F7 does it still count as a C major scale progression?


i was so confused
song stuck in my head today


#8
Quote by lbc_sublime
^ i started reading what you where saying and i all the info i gave him was under the impression he was doing a Cminor progression lol.


i was so confused


sorry about that i was confused about chord progression after someone at another guitar forum said the order doesn't matter and i took it the wrong way i guess.
#9
Quote by DisSatisfaction
sorry about that i was confused about chord progression after someone at another guitar forum said the order doesn't matter and i took it the wrong way i guess.



the chords you play doesn't matter as long as the music sounds good to you

but the chords you play do matter to the key you are playing in. however you should play and figure out the key later. IMO

i never try to write anything in which i say to myself "today i think i will play Em"

<.< >.>

however alot of things i play are in Em lol. it is the best key ever........
song stuck in my head today