#1
Yeah with a metronome, but could somebody elaborate on that? Or do you have any other suggestions? Any suggestions are welcome and appreciated! I need to improve this as soon as possible and improve my playing... Besides this will give me more coordination to sing along too!
Last edited by halooo at Sep 4, 2009,
#2
i would say do warm up exercises at different speeds using the metronome, then gradually increase the tempo of the metronome. how long have you been playing?
#3
in order to be able to sing while playing you have to be extremely comfortable with the song, so before you start trying to sing along make sure you can play the song without even thinking about it
It's always the last day of summer and I've been left out in the cold with no door to get back in
#4
Not that much to say, really. For timing, the metronome is the way to go. Whatever you're practicing, do it to the metronome. Make sure to explore it's range. Sometimes, keeping time at a very slow BPM can be very difficult, but it can be very beneficial. Don't just do quarter notes. Do eighths, triplets, sixteenths... Mix them up, too. Get fluid at going from eighths to triplets, and so on.

Tapping your foot can be helpful to really feel the tempo. It will come in time, don't worry.

If you want to learn to sing along, then you'll probably want to practice many different strumming patterns as well. Practice them until you can do them in your sleep.

One note, though. Try and really nail the timing. I mean that you should be playing the note so on the beat that you can barely hear the metronome beat. Really get it timed right. Eventually, you can start learning to play slightly before or after the beat, but that's for later, after you've got a great deal of control of your timing and rhythm.
"Whaddya mean DYNAMICS?! I'm playing as loud as I can!"
#5
Quote by Grep
Not that much to say, really. For timing, the metronome is the way to go. Whatever you're practicing, do it to the metronome. Make sure to explore it's range. Sometimes, keeping time at a very slow BPM can be very difficult, but it can be very beneficial. Don't just do quarter notes. Do eighths, triplets, sixteenths... Mix them up, too. Get fluid at going from eighths to triplets, and so on.

Tapping your foot can be helpful to really feel the tempo. It will come in time, don't worry.

If you want to learn to sing along, then you'll probably want to practice many different strumming patterns as well. Practice them until you can do them in your sleep.

One note, though. Try and really nail the timing. I mean that you should be playing the note so on the beat that you can barely hear the metronome beat. Really get it timed right. Eventually, you can start learning to play slightly before or after the beat, but that's for later, after you've got a great deal of control of your timing and rhythm.


This was really helpful man, thanks! Anything you want to add would be deeply appreciated. I've been playing for 6 years, I'm decent but I want to play flawless, professionally really soon. So, I'm really getting into this. By the way... Jamming with a drummer, bass player, playing with a band will help with the timing too?
#6
Quote by halooo
This was really helpful man, thanks! Anything you want to add would be deeply appreciated. I've been playing for 6 years, I'm decent but I want to play flawless, professionally really soon. So, I'm really getting into this. By the way... Jamming with a drummer, bass player, playing with a band will help with the timing too?
Glad it was useful!

Sure, playing with a drummer/bass player/etc will help timing. Even if he keeps poor time, you still need to sync up with him, so in that sense it'll help your control. But mostly, it'll help with rhythm. The two skills are linked, but they're still somewhat different things. You can have flawless timing, but terrible rhythm, for example.

Luck!
"Whaddya mean DYNAMICS?! I'm playing as loud as I can!"
#7
Practice along with a metronome. I like to set it to beat on the quarter notes and I do more subdivisions when playing (turn into octaves, triplets 16ths and 16th triplets) with the metronome only marking the quarter notes, that way I get more into timing without needing the device to mark each subdivision.
Also playing with other people will help you alott in timing specially because other people arent perfect most the time either, so you have to sync to them as they play. I remember when I started playing with some friends, our drummer would always play at a slightly different speed so everyone had to adjust accordingly.
Backing tracks help alot too, you have to keep everything within a certain timing so your imrpovisation falls rihgt according to chord changes
#8
Make sure your right hand is synced with your left hand. Practice right hand exercises; Steve Vai has done lots of really useful ones. Make sure you are clear in your timing and let the beat play a few times before starting as well.
#9
I don't have a real metronome with me but rather an electronic one; TempoPerfect. It makes a different sound for each note subdivision but the volume levels and the sound the make hard to follow. Do you think it is a decent metronome o perhaps you know of a better one?

I've been trying coordination exercises, not just for the guitar. It seems to be helping even to sing while playing, listening to famous song beats and following it steady with tapping my feet. Gotta get more used to the metronome.