#1
Ok, so this guitar used to be my Great-Grandfathers. When I was little, I dropped it, and the neck cracked. Now that I am a little more experienced with wood, I was wondering if anyone knew how to fix it?

Pics:




Any instructions or How To's would be greatly appreciated. I don't really care how much it costs to fix, because my family would love to see me play this guitar again.


Also, does anyone know what brand/model this guitar is?

#2
there should be some instructional videos on youtube. it looks like on old airline guitar but i'm probably wrong
#3
I don't know what kind of guitar it is, but it is certainly beautiful. Whenever you get it fixed I'd like to hear it.
#4
Quote by odstwarhead
Now that I am a little more experienced with wood, I was wondering if anyone knew how to fix it?


Hmm...

You sure you can't just take it to someone who is even more experienced?
#5
To me it looks a little like an Ibanez Jet king, i'm guessing it won't be due to the whole age of it.
Last edited by abhorsen12 at Sep 5, 2009,
#6
Looks easily repairable. You'll probably be told to finish off the break, and then use titebond original and clamp it all up very securely.

Personally I wouldn't finish the break; I'd slide as much glue in there using a credit card or something, and clamp it, but the first method is more likely to work.
#7
it looks a lot like a Teisco SS-4L. Probably a Kawai or one of several Teisco look-alikes
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#8
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
it looks a lot like a Teisco SS-4L. Probably a Kawai or one of several Teisco look-alikes

Thanks, that definately is what the guitar is, because it does say "Model Japan" on the back of the headstock
#9
Quote by dandadog
Looks easily repairable. You'll probably be told to finish off the break, and then use titebond original and clamp it all up very securely.

Personally I wouldn't finish the break; I'd slide as much glue in there using a credit card or something, and clamp it, but the first method is more likely to work.

The reason you have to finish the break is to get maximum glue coverage. No way in hell are you going to get enough glue in that tiny crack to work.
#10
Quote by Invader Jim
The reason you have to finish the break is to get maximum glue coverage. No way in hell are you going to get enough glue in that tiny crack to work.


Fair enough, is there a "best way" to finish off the crack though?
#11
Quote by Invader Jim
The reason you have to finish the break is to get maximum glue coverage. No way in hell are you going to get enough glue in that tiny crack to work.

Ok, is Titebond the right kind of glue?
#13
And like dandabong said, is there a "best way" to finish the break?

And how would I apply the glue? just smear it all over, or what?
#14
When you're clamping, make sure that you put something in between the clamps and the wood. I would hate to see you get the thing fixed only to have indentations from the clamps on both sides. Anything from some thick cardboard, or a piece of wood should work.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
"If I said you had a beautiful body, would you hold it against me?"
#15
the only "best" way to finish a break is to have the balls to actually do it.

just pour glue all over the exposed wood, press and clamp the pieces together, and quickly remove the excess glue that runs out.
#16
What size bottle of glue should I get?

And do you have any idea how long it actually takes to dry?
#19
Quote by Invader Jim
the only "best" way to finish a break is to have the balls to actually do it.

just pour glue all over the exposed wood, press and clamp the pieces together, and quickly remove the excess glue that runs out.

that is so true! thats why i had some one else do it on my acoustic. it was the first guitar i bought by myself.
#20
Ok, so, here are some pics of what I did:

I got some Titebond Original


Then, I started taking off the hardware on the headstock. I couldn't believe how much stuff there was to take off.
Here is the headtock, without taking anything off:



Here, I took off the tuning pegs:



Here, I took off the silver metal that the tuning pegs rested on:



Then, I took the actual tuners, the metal bar that held the strings down, and the truss rod cover off:



Here is the headstock with everything completely off of it:



I forgot to take pictures of when I completed the break, unfortunately... But here are some pictures of the Titebond drying the neck and headstock back together:


Last edited by odstwarhead at Sep 6, 2009,
#21
That guitar almost looks like an Ibanez Jet king. Just compare the pictures and you'll see what i mean. It looks very similar to it, even though jet kings are somewhat new. Anyway nice guitar and i hope you get it working
#22
Quote by DisasterMatt
That guitar almost looks like an Ibanez Jet king. Just compare the pictures and you'll see what i mean. It looks very similar to it, even though jet kings are somewhat new. Anyway nice guitar and i hope you get it working


I'll think you'll find that the jet kings look like this
the Jet King series was made to replicate the vintage look of guitars like this one