#1
ok i am self taught and i managed to teach myself the major, natural minor harmonic minor, and melodic or jazz minor scales. i know all the chords that go with major and natural minor scales. but what chords go good over harmonic minor scales? would i just play in the minor key and if the chord contains the seventh scale degree of the minor key im playin in just make it sharp? idk but i wrote some awesome leads using harmonic minor scales but im not sure what chords to use? help please lol
#2
minor 7th chords perhaps? They would go well.
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#4
In the natural minor scale, the "5" chord is minor. That eliminates the possibility of having a dominant "5" chord resolving to the "1" chord (which happens in the major scale such as A7 - D). Ergo, musicians often play the "5" chord as a major or dominant chord when playing in a minor key. Instead of playing Em - Am, one would play E7 - Am to get that same sort of resolution. The difference between Em and E is that Em contains G and E contains G#. This is how the harmonic minor scale is typically used. One does not usually make a progression out of chords derived strictly from A harmonic minor. One would make a progression such as Am Dm Am C Am G F E7. That E7 comes from A harmonic minor, while the rest comes from A natural minor.

For several centuries, until the 1980s, the harmonic minor scale wasn't used to create leads and progressions independent of the natural minor scale; it was used to make the V7 chord in a minor key.

As always, I suggest that you read the theory link in my sig.
#5
aha that makes good sense thanks for clearing that up! i understand now lol
#6
Harmonic minor isn't often used as a scale in its own right, but it usually mixed with the natural minor so you can use a Major 7th to resolve to the root. That's not to say that it can't be used alone. The Diatonic 7th chords for the harmonic minor scale are i(Maj7), ii(m7b5), III(Maj7#5), iv(m7), V(7), VI(Maj7), vii(dim7). The roman numerals represent whether the triad is major/minor, and in the parentheses is the 7th of the chord, and any alterations to the triad.

EDIT:Yea, Sue explained the part about mixing the two scales better than I did.
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Last edited by CHOCOmoney at Sep 6, 2009,
#7
The harmonic scale starting from the tonic would work well over a minor-major 7 chord (A harmonic minor over AmM7 (A C E G#), I like to work modally with the scale, specially using the ever popular phrygian dominant mode built from the 5th degree of the harmonic minor which can go over 7b9 chords.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
In the natural minor scale, the "5" chord is minor. That eliminates the possibility of having a dominant "5" chord resolving to the "1" chord (which happens in the major scale such as A7 - D). Ergo, musicians often play the "5" chord as a major or dominant chord when playing in a minor key. Instead of playing Em - Am, one would play E7 - Am to get that same sort of resolution. The difference between Em and E is that Em contains G and E contains G#. This is how the harmonic minor scale is typically used. One does not usually make a progression out of chords derived strictly from A harmonic minor. One would make a progression such as Am Dm Am C Am G F E7. That E7 comes from A harmonic minor, while the rest comes from A natural minor.

For several centuries, until the 1980s, the harmonic minor scale wasn't used to create leads and progressions independent of the natural minor scale; it was used to make the V7 chord in a minor key.

As always, I suggest that you read the theory link in my sig.


In addition to all this (all of it is correct), the ♮viio7 chord which can then be built on the leading tone in the minor works well as a tonic prolongation and a dominant substitution.
Last edited by isaac_bandits at Sep 6, 2009,
#9
#viio7? Is that supposed to be the diminished chord based on the natural seventh of the harmonic minor scale?

If that's the case, you're raising a major seventh by a half step; you know what that means!
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
#viio7? Is that supposed to be the diminished chord based on the natural seventh of the harmonic minor scale?

If that's the case, you're raising a major seventh by a half step; you know what that means!


I meant to have said ♮viio7, as in the diminished seventh chord built on the leading tone in a minor key.