#1
Would this be a good tuning to play metal riffs and still be good to practice in?

I've been learning scales and their patterns (i'm trying to get away from that) and chords and ect.
#2
I don't see why you would, but I also don't see why you wouldn't.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
I don't see why you would, but I also don't see why you wouldn't.


Well I had it in Drop C tuning and I liked that cause it sounded heavy when I tried to come up with a riff, but I hated it cause practiceing scales a nd chords sucked. I just want to find a happy medium.
#4
Quote by food1010
I don't see why you would, but I also don't see why you wouldn't.

You could take his advice, but you also could ignore it.
#6
get a 7 string and drop the B to an A. that way you have the dropped tuning for the chug and heaviness you said you liked and you still have the top 6 strings in standard for scales and junk.

that's why i use a 7 string (sometimes).

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
#7
Quote by SPBY
get a 7 string and drop the B to an A. that way you have the dropped tuning for the chug and heaviness you said you liked and you still have the top 6 strings in standard for scales and junk.

that's why i use a 7 string (sometimes).


lol, thats sweet.
#8
Quote by Blckspawn
lol, thats sweet.


well i tune up a whole step from drop A with .008's (so technically drop B on a 7 string, with a high F#) because i find drop A to be too muddy for my current amp. Maybe when i get a 6505 or that nice carvin v3212 i've been eyeing i'll try again.

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
#10
Quote by Blckspawn
ok so just to be clear, C standard is C-F-Bb-Eb-G-C

Right?


yes

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
#11
The only problem I have with drop C is if your going to play breakdowns, its difficult to hold the c chord and do whatever in the middle of the chugs, if you get what im saying. if your just playing like TBDM type metal, like regular metal lol with no breakdowns, then its awesome, I love it
Why play 6 when you can play 7?
#12
Quote by Gromlich
if you get what im saying.
I'm going to guess that no one does.

C standard is pretty common in metal. In Flames uses the tuning, and Dream Theater uses it for Train of Thought. Those are two example that came to my head fast; there are myriad others.

What about the tuning makes you apprehensive about practice? Do you not completely understand what a downtuning does? The chord and scale patterns remain valid; just give them names with notes 2 full tones lower than they would be in standard tuning. (Instead of the open E chord in standard tuning, that pattern gives a C major chord in C standard. Do the same for everything else.)
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
What about the tuning makes you apprehensive about practice? Do you not completely understand what a downtuning does? The chord and scale patterns remain valid; just give them names with notes 2 full tones lower than they would be in standard tuning. (Instead of the open E chord in standard tuning, that pattern gives a C major chord in C standard. Do the same for everything else.)


I wasn't sure, when I tuned to Drop C the patterns were off (cause of the lowE) and that made it hard to practice scales.
#15
Quote by Blckspawn
I wasn't sure, when I tuned to Drop C the patterns were off (cause of the lowE) and that made it hard to practice scales.
then you could try D Standard as well unless you think thats not heavy enough
#17
Quote by Blckspawn
I wasn't sure, when I tuned to Drop C the patterns were off (cause of the lowE) and that made it hard to practice scales.


A drop tuning lowers the bottom string by 2 frets (one whole step). If that's what's confusing you, either learn the notes on the strings so you don't have to rely on patterns... Or just tune from Drop C to D standard when you want to practice your 'patterns'. All you'd have to do is raise the low string a whole step. But I suggest learning the actual notes.
#18
Quote by Superperfex
Try C# standard. That is what I use most of the time.


You mean Db standard.

Tuning is irrelevant to genre, really.
#19
Quote by Eastwinn
You mean Db standard.

Tuning is irrelevant to genre, really.





They're enharmonic. Whichever name you call it is only relevant if you're notating it, really.
#20
Quote by timeconsumer09


They're enharmonic. Whichever name you call it is only relevant if you're notating it, really.


If you're dropping in tuning then it should definitely be a flat.
#21
Quote by Eastwinn
If you're dropping in tuning then it should definitely be a flat.

It does not really matter. And let's not argue about it. Jeez.

And I only suggested the tuning since he wants to play some metal. This tuning is pretty good for nice heavy riffs.
#22
I've never tried C standard (wouldn't you need your guitar specially set up so the treble strings don't go all floppy?), but I enjoy this one: C G D G B E. Sounds great for metal stuff and also other styles of music. Easy because you're only changing 2 strings.
#23
I actually love Drop C standard, I love the heavyness I can get out of it, and also get a very nice and easy sound, but since its two steps down from standard, transfering chords and notes is actually pertty easy. If you listen to the first 3 songs on my MP3's, those where recorded in Drop A# and C standard.

I like it even more becuase it challenges you to learn your notes, and how to change them in scales.

EDIT: to above poster, you dont have to have your guitar set up for a Drop C tuning, I had mine set for standard and use .10 guage strings and I play in Drop C all the time without any problem.
Last edited by ethan_hanus at Sep 7, 2009,