#1
I really want to get into longboarding, and I want to buy my first board. Several of my friends longboard and have told me if I don't mind dropping the extra money that getting a loaded board will be much better in the long run than starting out getting something such as a sector nine because eventually I'll want a loaded. What do you guys that know about longboarding think? The price difference is the main issue. I could get a Sector 9 for about $150 - $180 and I could get a Loaded for between $240-$270.
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#2
skateboard thread

but seriously, just get a regular skateboard, they are better because not only can you ride them, you can do tricks
Last edited by Streetking07 at Sep 6, 2009,
#4
Quote by Streetking07
skateboard thread

but seriously, just get a regular skateboard, they are better because not only can you ride them, you can do tricks


Longboards are LEAAAAAAGUES faster.
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#5
Quote by Streetking07
skateboard thread

but seriously, just get a regular skateboard, they are better because not only can you ride them, you can do tricks



lolno.

Longboards and Skateboards are for totally different things.

Speed + Stability + Maneuverability = Longboard
Tricks + Slower speeds + Less stability = Skateboards
RIP Tom Searle.
#6
Longboards are much better for starting out IMO. Try riding a normal board 5 or 6 miles.

I've got 7 very different longboards, and none of them came as completes. It'll be more expensive but what you should do is buy the exact parts you want and assemble it yourself. The main things here in order of importance are:

1. Trucks - These will really define the board, and how it handles. Its also the component that most completes cheap out on. Personally I can't stand using normal trucks. Once you try some of the newer stuff that's out there (normal trucks are based on 1920's rollerskate technology BTW) you'll never want to go back. The main thing to consider is the width of the trucks. Unless you're doing slalom, you want the widest possible trucks that you won't hit with your foot while pushing. You don't want them sticking out the side of the board unless your board is very narrow, or so long that your foot can't reach the back truck.
I'd recommend 'Seismic', 'Originals', or 'Revenge' for trucks, with Seismic being the best choice. They use interchangeable springs, and are good for literally any application, which will come in handy once you develop your riding style.

2. Deck - The main thing to look for in a deck are the size (length and width), concave, shape, and amount of flex.
Size determines how heavy the board is, which makes a huge difference in the difficulty of pushing (a really heavy board is a pain in the ass). In terms of width, you don't want a board that's so wide you can't find the center and can't balance well, but you want a deck wide enough that your feet have a lot of contact with the griptape. Length determines your foot placement, which you probably won't have a preference on until you've been riding for a while. Lastly is your turning radius. The thing here is, you're not concerned with how big a circle you have to do, but how sharp of a curve you can take at high speeds (by which I mean anything over ~10 mph). The longer a board is (more importantly how long the wheelbase is), the more stable it is, but the longer a board is, the greater its turning radius.
Concave is how flat or deep the deck is. I like my decks to be totally flat, but some people like concave decks. You should stand on a few decks to see which feels most comfortable.
Shape is kind of a personal preference thing. You'll figure out what you like after riding for a while. The only thing to consider now is whether or not you want a kicktail, but you should first determine how long you want the board to be, because if its very long, you'll never use the kicktail (which doesn't mean you shouldn't have one, if you like the look of it).
Flex is a tricky thing. I hate flex and all of my decks are totally stiff, but a lot of people claim that flex takes some of the harshness out of the ride. Its supposed to absorb bumps, and be more forgiving around turns. I don't mind bumps because I have huge wheels, and I prefer the direct connection to the pavement feel that a stiff deck gives you. With a stiffer deck you can feel when you're going to slide out easier, but with a flexible deck you'll be less likely to slide out in the first place. You'll freak out if you just randomly lose traction though, and you'll probably wipe out. With a stiff deck, you'll know its coming and you can either slow down, or pull a sick slide turn.

3. Wheels - The main thing in wheels is size, and durometer rating. Bigger wheels help keep your momentum, and the ride over bumps easier. Bigger wheels also increase your flat out top speed. Smaller wheels are easier to push with because they weigh less (rolling mass (wheels) has a proportionally greater effect on the acceleration and momentum of a board than the 'sprung' weight (deck and trucks)). Small wheels also put you closer to the ground which, again, makes it easier to push.
Durometer rating is how soft or hard the wheels are. Softer wheels grip better, and wear out slightly faster (don't worry about this though, they'll probably last the life of the board, unlike short boards). Hard wheels slide better. You'll want wheels that aren't rock hard, but aren't mushy.

4. Bearings - These are actually very important, but they're last because there's no debate or personal opinion (other than brands) in choosing bearings. Faster is better.
'Bones' makes some of the best bearings out there. Their 'Reds' are definitely the best bang-for-your-buck bearings. They also make the super high end 'Swiss Ceramics'.
Another good brand is 'Black Panther'. Their abec 7's are a very good mid-quality bearing, and they seem to me to last much longer than anything else I've tried.

I hope this helps you out man, longboarding is an awesome sport, once you get into it.


EDIT: Also, you can put together a badass custom board (I'm talking the absolute best money can buy) for around $300.
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Last edited by wiliscool at Sep 6, 2009,
#7
No one is impressed by longboarders, get into real skating.
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#8
No one rides a longboard to impress other people.
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#9
Quote by xBrando
No one is impressed by longboarders, get into real skating.



*sigh*

We longboard because the feeling is awesome, not to impress others.
RIP Tom Searle.
#10
It's not like there's a ton of people hanging out in parking garages or on the side of a mountain to watch you skate either
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#11
Quote by wiliscool
It's not like there's a ton of people hanging out in parking garages or on the side of a mountain to watch you skate either


Actually there are plenty of skate competitions.
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#12
Quote by MH400
*sigh*

We longboard because the feeling is awesome, not to impress others.


Well I mean, anyone can longboard. As long as they are just a little cordinated.
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#13
Quote by xBrando
Well I mean, anyone can longboard. As long as they are just a little cordinated.


It does take skill, though.

It sounds real simple, but going at a decent speed, lifting a foot and using it as a brake is pretty damn hard / scary.
RIP Tom Searle.
#14
Quote by xBrando
Actually there are plenty of skate competitions.

Not as much, as far as longboarding goes.

Quote by xBrando
Well I mean, anyone can longboard. As long as they are just a little cordinated.

Talk to me when you hit 45 mph on your shortboard.

Quote by MH400
lifting a foot and using it as a brake is pretty damn hard / scary.

Real men power slide

But yeah, I've nearly pissed myself a few times...
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
Last edited by wiliscool at Sep 6, 2009,
#15
Quote by MH400
It does take skill, though.

It sounds real simple, but going at a decent speed, lifting a foot and using it as a brake is pretty damn hard / scary.


Ehh I guess, but it depends on what your comparing it to. Longboarding takes the least amount of skill IMO compared to skating, surfing, snowboarding, etc.
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#16
Quote by wiliscool
Not as much, as far as longboarding goes.


Talk to me when you hit 45 mph on your shortboard.


Actually, I have been towed by a car going around 35 on my skate. Got speed wobble and ate ****

And your missing the point, all Im saying is that it takes no skill. Going down a hill at 45 doesn't take any skill at all. Just the balls to do it...
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#17
Quote by xBrando
Ehh I guess, but it depends on what your comparing it to. Longboarding takes the least amount of skill IMO compared to skating, surfing, snowboarding, etc.

No way, dude. I grew up surfing. Its nothing when you can just fall into the water.

Quote by xBrando
And your missing the point, all Im saying is that it takes no skill. Going down a hill at 45 doesn't take any skill at all. Just the balls to do it...

No fucking way. It takes a ton of skill. You don't just 'go down a hill' at 45. You've got to really know what you're doing. If you can't carve or slow down (and you sure as hell can't use your foot to stop at 45), you'll eat shit big time.
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
Last edited by wiliscool at Sep 6, 2009,
#18
Quote by wiliscool
No way, dude. I grew up surfing. Its nothing when you can just fall into the water.


Does pain affect the amount of skill it takes?
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#19
You've obviously never bombed a hill on a longboard, and you have no idea what you're talking about. I actively do all of the sports you mentioned, and trust me, longboarding takes just as much skill as any of them.
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wiliscool is just plain dumb
#20
Quote by xBrando

And your missing the point, all Im saying is that it takes no skill. Going down a hill at 45 doesn't take any skill at all. Just the balls to do it...


I'm sorry, but you're wrong.

Any sport takes skill.

You can't say that going around a corner at 45mph just takes balls?

It takes skill to not skid out, to counter the speed wobbles etc

Sorry, I just like longboarding
RIP Tom Searle.
#21
Quote by wiliscool
You've obviously never bombed a hill on a longboard, and you have no idea what you're talking about. I actively do all of the sports you mentioned, and trust me, longboarding takes just as much skill as any of them.


I guess its where your strengths are because longboarding came very easy to me.
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#22
Okay, picking up a longboard and taking off is much easier than any of the other board sports, but there's a much steeper learning curve. Let's leave it at that.
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#23
Quote by wiliscool
Okay, picking up a longboard and taking off is much easier than any of the other board sports, but there's a much steeper learning curve. Let's leave it at that.


Agreed.
"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not."

~ Kurt Cobain ~
#24
Sorry for the theadjacking TS
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#25
Dude, watch a video of REAL longboarders on youtube. I had originally had the idea that it was just pushing off of the ground, moving, and turning at curbs. Watch these guys, the carve back and forth and they go fricking amazingly fast and then theres guys that do tricks on these and I didn't even know that was possible.
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#26
a sector 9 would be just fine.. they're very nice boards and you don't need a great one when you're just starting out.


just go for a sector 9 they're really good
enjoi yourself


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#27
If this thread isn't the definition of circle jerk, then I don't know what is...
#28
Don't believe your friends when they tell you that a Loaded board is the one and only board that you can ever use.

I suggest starting off with something relatively cheap but good.
The Earthwing superglider, Neversummer Eclipse, Sector 9 Bomb Hills, Landyachtz mummy, Landyachtz haida, and Arbor pintail are all good boards off the top of my head that I would recommend as starting boards.

Although the Loaded boards are pretty nice, they're very expensive and are generally a love it or hate it board. Since you are a beginning boarder you don't know what you want exactly in a board, going straight to Loaded is not the best idea.


Coming in a very close second to the board is the truck selection. Randall or Paris trucks are both fantastic starting trucks that will start you off on the right foot. You may want to invest in a set of bushings further along the road, they will help immensely with improving the trucks.

Wheels and bearings will come last in terms of beginner board importance. I would talk to the store worker for good suggestions on what will be the best wheel for the board. I personally enjoy gumballs, zigzags, bigzigs, or orangatangs are what I would suggest looking at. Bearings should be pretty simple. Stay with abec 3's, there's no need to spend more money on higher rating bearings, I've always stuck Bones Reds on my pintails.

Finally, whatever you buy make sure that when you walk out of the store you are happy with the board. No matter what your friends or people on the internet say, it's your board. If you aren't happy with your purchase, then all the advise in the world doesn't mean jack.
Last edited by kaplac at Sep 6, 2009,