#1
I'm looking for metal rhythm patterns written in music notation, with slashes and all that. I play mostly in 4/4 with the down/up/down/up/etc (so my arm keeps swinging like a pendulum, I do a downstroke on every beat and an upstroke inbetween beats. "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and"), and haven't dabbled in any other time signatures yet. (About that, what should I learn to understand the more complex rhythm patterns?)

Could you guys provide me with some metal rhythm patterns, please? (Power metal in the style of Sonata Arctica and Rhapsody of Fire | Iron Maiden-style metal | Manowar-style metal | Blind Guardian-style metal)
#2
If you like power metal you can try these songs, they have nice rhythm patterns and riffs:

Edguy - Mysteria
Edguy - Vain Glory Opera
Hammerfall - Hearts On Fire
Hammerfall - Steel Meets Steel
#3
I'm not sure I understand what you're looking for: tabs/sheet music, technique, ...?
The "galloping" rhythm of Iron Maiden (as in Run to the Hills) is a lot of :
:V V^V V^V V^V V^: ... down, down-up-down, down-up-down... in sixteenth notes, changing chords every 2, 4 or 8 beats.
At this speed, I would recommend switching from arm movements to forearm or wrist movements.
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Last edited by tickler444 at Sep 6, 2009,
#4
Yes, try some Iron Maiden...

Also, this could maybe help you switching time signatures. If you need any help on counting them, PM me...



That's the intro riff from Mordecai, by Between The Buried And Me. Not your style, but good for practice. Make sure you try to get it up to speed, the speed is what is hard about this...
#5

I'm not sure I understand what you're looking for: tabs/sheet music, technique, ...?
The "galloping" rhythm of Iron Maiden (as in Run to the Hills) is a lot of :
:V V^V V^V V^V V^: ... down, down-up-down, down-up-down... in sixteenth notes, changing chords every 2, 4 or 8 beats.
At this speed, I would recommend switching from arm movements to forearm or wrist movements.

I meant sheet music, the kind of rhythm patterns you see on justinguitar.com and guitar lesson DVD's.

Example:

Each beat is represented by a slash, and whether you have to hit down or up is written above it.

Care to write the gallop in that notation?

I strum with my forearm and a loose wrist.

---------


If you like power metal you can try these songs, they have nice rhythm patterns and riffs:

Edguy - Mysteria
Edguy - Vain Glory Opera
Hammerfall - Hearts On Fire
Hammerfall - Steel Meets Steel

Thanks, i'll have a look

---------


Yes, try some Iron Maiden...

I'll have a look, thanks


Also, this could maybe help you switching time signatures. If you need any help on counting them, PM me...

Yeah, I do need help, I only understand how to count 4/4, and "1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3". And I don't know what time signature 1 2 3 is.
#6
1 2 3 could be 3/4, so in every measure there are 3 counts (3/4) and the quarter note (3/4) is one count.

7/8, you could count it as 1 2 3 4 5 6 7, with the 8th note being one count since it's 7/8.

More handy might be to break it up into 1 2 3 4 1 2 3, again the 8th note being one count, or breaking it up into 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 or 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 or whatever. Every combination that makes 7 and works for you will be okay.

This can be done with every time signature, if we for example take 13/16 (not something you'll see much) that can be broken up into 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 for example.

Using that method, you will be able to count every time signature.

If you need more explanation just say
#7

If you need more explanation just say

What do you mean with the 8th note being one count? Do you mean as in, the 8th note counts as a 1? So it goes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (repeat)? What if it is 7/9? Does that mean that i should count "1 2 3 4 5 (repeat)"?

Thanks for your explanation
#8
you could buy a song book of a band you like , and then copy the rhythm parts on to a blank piece of paper .
when you are happy with some ideas , let's say 3 rhythms then you could use a program
such as "muse score" or maybe "guitar pro " ? to put your work into digital form .
I feel the answer for you lies , in your doing .
with respect a lot of the internet seems based on quick fix , free easy options , but even through you might " not want to reinvent the wheel" there comes a certain understanding from you putting the time and work into it.
#9
Quote by robinlint
What do you mean with the 8th note being one count? Do you mean as in, the 8th note counts as a 1? So it goes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (repeat)? What if it is 7/9? Does that mean that i should count "1 2 3 4 5 (repeat)"?

Thanks for your explanation


I meant to say "eigth note", as in half a quarter note. Sorry I worded that badly...

7/9 doesn't exist, since there is no such thing as a ninth note. Remember, in time signatures the first number tells you how much *second number* notes there are in one measure. 11/8 means 11 eigth notes in one measure, counted like:

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3
x x x x x x x x x x x

With the "x" being one eigth note.

If you need any more examples please so!
#10
A gallop is an 8th note followed by two 16th notes, repeated - so you're playing 1 &a2 &a3 &a4 &a.....

Other than that, you can make your own up - just think of a rhythm, tab it out, then work out which should be upstrokes and which downstrokes.

I can't stick any notation up atm but I'll try later...
#11
Quote by KoenDercksen
I meant to say "eigth note", as in half a quarter note. Sorry I worded that badly...

7/9 doesn't exist, since there is no such thing as a ninth note. Remember, in time signatures the first number tells you how much *second number* notes there are in one measure. 11/8 means 11 eigth notes in one measure, counted like:

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3
x x x x x x x x x x x

With the "x" being one eigth note.

If you need any more examples please so!

Ah, that makes sense. So if the number is 11/8, the second number means 8th note. Care to list what number means what kind of note? For example, what number means quarter note, what number means a half note, and what number means a whole note?
#12
Quote by zhilla
A gallop is an 8th note followed by two 16th notes, repeated - so you're playing 1 &a2 &a3 &a4 &a.....

I just tried that out.. I didn't know what you meant by "8th note followed by two 16th notes", but I did understand the 1 &a2 &a3 &a4 &a. Now I get the gallop, thanks! . What is the 1 &a2 &a3 &a4 rhythm called? I only know 1 2 3 4, 1 & 2 & 3 & 4, and now 1 &a2 &a3 &a4, but I want to know what it is called. Oh, and do you have any other of those rhythm counts or whatever they are called?


Other than that, you can make your own up - just think of a rhythm, tab it out, then work out which should be upstrokes and which downstrokes.

I make up my own rhythms a lot, but never write them down. Thanks for the tip, though, will probably do so when I find a rhythm i REALLY like.
Last edited by robinlint at Sep 6, 2009,
#13
Quote by robinlint
Ah, that makes sense. So if the number is 11/8, the second number means 8th note. Care to list what number means what kind of note? For example, what number means quarter note, what number means a half note, and what number means a whole note?


Sure,

2 = half note
4 = quarter note
8 = eigth note
16 = sixteenth note
32 = thirtysecond note

etc...

You won't see any time signatures with whole notes though.

You can however figure out how long the whole note would be.

In 4/4, there are 4 quarter notes, and a whole note consists out of 4 quarter notes. So a whole note would take the whole measure.

Ask if you don't understand.
#14
Its just a way of counting the rhythm out. When you've got a piece thats, say in 4/4, your beats are 1 2 3 4, if you want to break that into 8th notes, to keep the accents in the right place a common way of counting is 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

Take that one step further to 16th notes, and you get 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a - hence gallop is 1 &a2 &a3...

As they are pretty common they are a relatively easy way of explaining rhythms, even if you don't count like that in your head.

If you're working on strumming patterns, I wouldn't worry about finding a rhythm you like - tab any old rhythm down and see if you can strum it. That way you'll get some tricky ones as well as ones you like
#15
Quote by zhilla
Its just a way of counting the rhythm out. When you've got a piece thats, say in 4/4, your beats are 1 2 3 4, if you want to break that into 8th notes, to keep the accents in the right place a common way of counting is 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

Okay. So 4/4 (four quarter notes) is 1 2 3 4, and 8/8 (eight eighth notes) is 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & ???


Take that one step further to 16th notes, and you get 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a - hence gallop is 1 &a2 &a3...

So without the ghost strums, the gallop rhythm would be 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a???
Oh, and is this 16/16?
About the 16th note rhythm... I wanted to play fast rhythms today and had to tap my foot real fast because I was using 8th notes, but with 16th notes i don't need to tap my foot as fast while still playing fast and keeping a tight rhythm. Thanks!
EDIT: Wow, now I can play fast gallops within a tight rhythm (not ultra-fast though) and 16th rhythms, also tightly. Thanks a LOT!!!!!


As they are pretty common they are a relatively easy way of explaining rhythms, even if you don't count like that in your head.

Okay.


If you're working on strumming patterns, I wouldn't worry about finding a rhythm you like - tab any old rhythm down and see if you can strum it. That way you'll get some tricky ones as well as ones you like

Thanks, nice tip

EDIT:
The correct time signatures are 4/4, 4/8, and 4/16, right?
Last edited by robinlint at Sep 6, 2009,
#16
Quote by KoenDercksen
7/9 doesn't exist, since there is no such thing as a ninth note.


7/9 exists. It consists of a bar containing seven notes which are each a ninth of a whole note (whole note nontuplets). This time signature must be used in conjunction with rational time signatures (integer power of 2 for the denominator), as otherwise the passage would sound the same as 7/8 only the BPM would be written differently. Irrational time signatures (which aren't necessarily irrational in a mathematical sense) are useful to keep everything at one constant tempo, while having bars that are not based on subdivisions into halves.
#17
^Ouch. The idea of trying to get whole note nontuplets down hurt my head just thinking about it.


Quote by robinlint
Okay. So 4/4 (four quarter notes) is 1 2 3 4, and 8/8 (eight eighth notes) is 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & ???

So without the ghost strums, the gallop rhythm would be 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a???
Oh, and is this 16/16?


Nah..all of these are 4/4. I think you are confusing number of beats per measure with subdividing the beat. In all the cases there are 4 beats (foot taps) per bar, each beat is a quarter note (one quarter of a 4/4 bar). But you are playing different numbers of notes per beat (subdividing the beat). So for example, 8 eighth notes, is just 4/4, with two notes played per beat.
#18
Quote by se012101
^Ouch. The idea of trying to get whole note nontuplets down hurt my head just thinking about it.


Yeah it is mainly theoretical. That being said, there are other irrational time signatures which aren't that hard to play. In one of my songs we use a bar of 5/12, which is just 5 quarter note triplets making up a bar. Nearly everyone can play quarter note triplets with ease, so its not much of a problem, aside from having to start the next bar in what originally felt like a very strange spot, metrically.
#19
Quote by se012101
^Ouch. The idea of trying to get whole note nontuplets down hurt my head just thinking about it.


Nah..all of these are 4/4. I think you are confusing number of beats per measure with subdividing the beat. In all the cases there are 4 beats (foot taps) per bar, each beat is a quarter note (one quarter of a 4/4 bar). But you are playing different numbers of notes per beat (subdividing the beat). So for example, 8 eighth notes, is just 4/4, with two notes played per beat.

Ah, thanks. So, it is like this?:
I am playing 16th notes in a 4/4 beat
I am playing 8th notes in a 4/4 beat
I am playing quarter notes in a 4/4 beat (Or, just, I am playing in a 4/4 beat)
#20
yup - you just subdivide it more depending on what the smallest commonly used note duration is - so if you're playing in 4/4 and its mostly quarter and 8th notes, you'd count 1 & 2 & etc.

For other time sigs your normal count would be on the beat - so for 6/8 you might just count 1 2, 1 2, ... as 6/8 often (not always) has the accents on the 1st and 4th quaver, making it feel like it has 2 dotted crotchet beats.

Basically, if you tap your foot to a song and let it fall where it feels like the beat lies, thats what you'd count as 1 2 3 etc.
#21
Quote by zhilla
yup - you just subdivide it more depending on what the smallest commonly used note duration is - so if you're playing in 4/4 and its mostly quarter and 8th notes, you'd count 1 & 2 & etc.

For other time sigs your normal count would be on the beat - so for 6/8 you might just count 1 2, 1 2, ... as 6/8 often (not always) has the accents on the 1st and 4th quaver, making it feel like it has 2 dotted crotchet beats.

Basically, if you tap your foot to a song and let it fall where it feels like the beat lies, thats what you'd count as 1 2 3 etc.


In 6/8, you count 1 + a 2 + a, since its in compound time.