#1
I wrote a chord progression and it goes like this:

Em    Em7    A    C  D


After finding working out the first three chords, I found what key it's in (it's in D) in order to find more chords to finish it up. Because it is in the key of D, the vii chord (C) should be at least minor, while it is should be diminished. But I perfer it to be major.

Now, assuming I didn't say anything incredibly wrong above, is there a name for what I did: making the vii chord major. I want to learn more about the theory behind this progression.
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#2
The C chord would be borrowed from D minor. Or you can consider it a secondary dominance.
#3
the seventh would be C#

bVII is C major and is a relatively common chord usage.

EDIT: to pwrmax, how is exactly is that a secondary dominant? V-of-bIII?
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Last edited by sharpiemarker at Sep 6, 2009,
#4
Why do you think it's in D? It sounds like it's in G to me. It feels very unfinished when you play the D chord. The A is just a borrowed chord.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Sep 6, 2009,
#5
Well, you're playing on a variation of the "swing"/jazz progression. (ii V I), but also incorporating the second half of the bVI-bVII-I progression (can't think of it's name). The only weird part of the progression is going from V to bVII.
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#6
Quote by timeconsumer09
Why do you think it's in D? It sounds like it's in G to me. It feels very unfinished when you play the D chord. The A is just a borrowed chord.


Because D is the only key I found where the A is major and the E is minor. Does the Em7 influence the key? I just treated it as another minor chord.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


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#7
Quote by rockingamer2
Because D is the only key I found where the A is major and the E is minor. Does the Em7 influence the key? I just treated it as another minor chord.


Well if you're saying A is major and E is minor then you're saying C is out of the key.
What if, E is minor and C is major and A is out of the key? I'm just saying that the key shouldn't be decided that way.
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Last edited by sharpiemarker at Sep 6, 2009,
#8
Quote by sharpiemarker
Well if you're saying A is major and E is minor then you're saying C is out of the key.
What if, E is minor and C is major and A is out of the key? I'm just saying that the key shouldn't be decided that way.


Well, that's why I came here.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#9
The A is out of key. Play a G major chord right after the D at the end. I think you'll hear the nice resolution.
#10
Problem with that is, ii6/5 chords are very common, especially in classical and jazz. So starting with the Em7 does make sense if he were in D. vi7 chords aren't very common, making the Em7 problematic if he were in G.
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
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#11
I played it, and thought it was in Em. The A chord is borrowed from the parallel major, and it uses a bVI-bVII-i movement which is pretty common.

I wouldn't call it G major since there never is a G chord played.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
I played it, and thought it was in Em. The A chord is borrowed from the parallel major, and it uses a bVI-bVII-i movement which is pretty common.

I wouldn't call it G major since there never is a G chord played.


I initially was going to say Em, but it doesn't feel like it pulls to the Em as well as the G.
#14
It would make more sense to me if the A was played before the D in the progression. Otherwise the A just looks/feels out of place without a good sense of function, but thats just how I hear it...
EDIT: Sounds fine and in Em, when i played it in original order using C kinda as a passing chord.
Last edited by AF.Mice Elf.ro at Sep 7, 2009,
#15
To me it sounds E minor, with the Am being the Amaj so it creates a chromatic line towards the C; D (Em7) > C# (Amaj) > C (Cmaj). The progression then would be i - i7 - IV - VI -VII.
#16
Quote by deHufter
To me it sounds E minor, with the Am being the Amaj so it creates a chromatic line towards the C; D (Em7) > C# (Amaj) > C (Cmaj). The progression then would be i - i7 - IV - VI -VII.


That would make sense. I voiced it differently, and the D C# C wasn't in the same voice, so it didn't sound very good.