#1
So i'm on a super tight budget (as most home recording enthusiasts are) but i really need something to mic my Toms that isn't complete crap.

To give an idea on my budget:

Bought an SM57 for 100. That wasn't terrible on the wallet, but still.

Bought an ST51 for 100. Again, not horrible, but...

Bought the Shure Beta 52A for 190. That made my bank account cringe with fear.


So anyways, if anyone has any reccommendations for cheap Tom Mics that sound decent, i need 2 of them at least.


Thanks!
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#7
Quote by hans the lefty
http://www.thomann.de/gb/the_tbone_mb75.htm

57 copys that are really good



hmm, that seems pretty interesting, but of course i'm cautious about such a direct rip off.

are you famillar with the mic?


also i definitly can't afford those 421's unless i win a tiny lottery, but thanks for pointing me to the 'industry standard' for tom mics, i've always wondered.
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#9
Quote by CatharsisStudio
Senheiser 604s sound fricken great

http://catharsis.supremepixels.com/SOLO.mp3 just listen to em

holy....... F*** dude that drum sound is freaking monstrous. did you sample anything besides the kick? that literally sounds like one of my all time favorite drums sounds, Death's ITP, and the drummer is pretty rocking.
#10
Quote by CatharsisStudio
Senheiser 604s sound fricken great

http://catharsis.supremepixels.com/SOLO.mp3 just listen to em



My hands just melted off.


(Thats like....when a guitar solo melts your face off, well.....drum solos melt....your hands off...)

Grr, i need a better budget, but those will probably be my final choice. Thanks!
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#11
Quote by CatharsisStudio
you are a god damn idiot

How so?
There's a ton of different ways to get a good drum sound, and the key to this is that the threadstarter is on a "super tight budget" - so mic'ing everything individually is unnecessary.

Remember, 3/4 of the battle is about getting the kit and drummer sounding great before you even pick up a mic. I'd personally take one or two mics on a high quality kit with decent skins and decent tuning over a fully mic'd pile of crap any day.

How many inputs are you going to be working with? If the drums are going to be recorded as a stereo submix, just get hold of four or five mics (a pair of condensers and a few dynamics) and experiment with different placements. The Glyn Johns technique is great for a budget setup (though perhaps less so if you sterile 'metal' drums where complete clarity is vital).
#13
Quote by CatharsisStudio
true. glynjohnson method is a great way but you need to have an EPIC room, and EPIC mics

also. you can sample replacement a crappy kit if you have everything seperated but you are very very right on get the kit to sound great etc etc. sorry for being dick :3

Fair point - I'm only really used to producing a more vintage sound, where you can take a few liberties with mic placement etc (Bonzo in the stairwell on 'When The Levee Breaks' being the ultimate example of inspired improv engineering).

But with modern metal drums, the priorities are a bit different.
In theory, I guess cheap kit>cheap mics>drumagog could produce really slick studio-quality results, even in a really horrible room. Requires plenty of simultaneous inputs though.

That, or get an electric kit and use MIDI sampling.
#15
well the thing is, i've definitly considered and attempted the Glyn Johns method. And for the type of music i'm doing (hard rock), it sounds decent, but just not what i'm looking for.

A lot of my drum beats and fills are heavily tom-based, and my overheads just don't capture that low presence that really bring out my drums. Especially because i use very large toms (dave-grohl style. or so i'd like to think)
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.