#1
So, I wrote the chorus to a song using a little chord progression I came up with. It starts in the key of D with F#add9, Dmajb5 then changes to the key of C with Eadd9, C.
So it takes advantage of a III - I resolution (two whole steps).
My problem is how to get to the chorus. I've written dozens of riffs and progressions to try to solve this problem but nothing sounds right. I was wondering if anyone could explain some theory about why this chorus works how it does, so that perhaps I could write a fitting verse/pre-chorus. I did notice that a Badd9 chord works quite well to lead into the F#add9 (because of the IV - I resolution) but that's all I can come up with. I just can't figure out what other chords would work before it.

Also, with the Dmajb5 and C chords the roots aren't the bass notes. This is crucial to the way the progression sounds. I figured I'd add tabs of the progression so you can hear AND see what I am talking about.
F#add9 Dmajb5 Eadd9 C
|--------------------|----------------------|
|--------------------|----------------------|
|--------------------|----------------------|
|-6--------3--------|-4--------2---------|
|-4--------4--------|-2--------3---------|
|-2--------4--------|-0--------3---------|

I know they probably don't affect the theory, but it couldn't hurt. Thanks in advance
Last edited by canvasDude at Sep 7, 2009,
#2
Heres a little guide that i like to use.

shows what each chord can be followed by.


I-------------Any chord
ii-------------IV, V, vii°
iii-------------ii, IV, vi
IV------------I, iii, V, vii°
V-------------I
vi-------------ii, IV, V, I
vii°----------I, iii
Last edited by Casuist at Sep 7, 2009,
#3
Quote by Casuist
Heres a little guide that i like to use.

shows what each chord can be followed by.


I-------------Any chord
ii-------------IV, V, vii°
iii-------------ii, IV, vi
IV------------I, iii, V, vii°
V-------------I
vi-------------ii, IV, V, I
vii°----------I, iii


Thanks man. I was wondering how I would use this to build tension leading up to the chorus. If I can't pull it off or it just doesn't sound right, I might use the progression like the intro/chorus of Clocks by Coldplay.
#5
I don't know how in the world you get Dmajb5 out of G# C# and F. If you ask me, that's a second inversion of C#. That would be the VII of D which really doesn't make sense.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by Well.......
Your first chord looks like a F#sus2.

It's not. It's a power chord with the 9 (extended 2) replacing the octave. Thus F#add9. I've seen it called and add9 power chord, but I figured "hey, it's a triad." But I see what you mean. Although I believe because the 2 is an octave higher it is an add 9. Plus it was the octave of the root that was replaced, not the 3rd. Correct me if I'm wrong.

EDIT: Now that I think about it, it makes more sense to call it a sus2 chord. Except it doesn't sound suspended (at least not to me).
Last edited by canvasDude at Sep 7, 2009,
#7
Quote by canvasDude
It's not. It's a power chord with the 9 (extended 2) replacing the octave. Thus F#add9. I've seen it called and add9 power chord, but I figured "hey, it's a triad." But I see what you mean. Although I believe because the 2 is an octave higher it is an add 9. Plus it was the octave of the root that was replaced, not the 3rd. Correct me if I'm wrong.



Unless another instrument is playing the third. It could be called F#maj9(no3), but that is a very ugly name.

Edit: It can also be called a C#sus4, which would relate to your next chord by calling it a an inversion of C#maj.
Last edited by Well....... at Sep 7, 2009,
#8
Quote by food1010
I don't know how in the world you get Dmajb5 out of G# C# and F. If you ask me, that's a second inversion of C#. That would be the VII of D which really doesn't make sense.


Yeah, I don't know what I was thinking. It's a C#sus4 isn't it? C#[1], F[4], G#[5]
#9
Quote by canvasDude
Yeah, I don't know what I was thinking. It's a C#sus4 isn't it? C#[1], F[4], G#[5]
Na, just C# major. The F is the third.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by Well.......
Unless another instrument is playing the third. It could be called F#maj9(no3), but that is a very ugly name.

Edit: It can also be called a C#sus4, which would relate to your next chord by calling it a an inversion of C#maj.


F#[1], C#[5], G#[9]. It's an F#add9 power chord or and F#sus2 with the 2 an octave higher. There's no point in inventing strange names for it. Btw, the song is played with med dist (a good fuzz). Just letting everyone know.

EDIT:
Quote by food1010
Na, just C# major. The F is the third.


Oops, forgot that E# and F were enharmonic. Btw, instead of arguing over chord names, can anyone explain to me why this works so well and perhaps explain how to create tension with different chords in a way that it will be released in the chorus?
Last edited by canvasDude at Sep 7, 2009,
#11
Quote by canvasDude
F#[1], C#[5], G#[9]. It's an F#add9 power chord or and F#sus2 with the 2 an octave higher. There's no point in inventing strange names for it. Btw, the song is played with med dist (a good fuzz). Just letting everyone know.



F#-G#-C# = 1-2-5

C#-F#-G# = 1-4-5
#12
Quote by Well.......
F#-G#-C# = 1-2-5

C#-F#-G# = 1-4-5


True, I know. But the bass note is F#, so it would make more sense to call it F#sus2.
#13
Quote by canvasDude
True, I know. But the bass note is F#, so it would make more sense to call it F#sus2.


Well, in this progression the C#sus4 works because it suspends the third of the C#maj chord Then it goes down half a step to some kind of a iisus-I substitution.
#14
Quote by Well.......
Well, in this progression the C#sus4 works because it suspends the third of the C#maj chord Then it goes down half a step to some kind of a iisus-I substitution.


I suppose, but I'm kinda tired of just naming chords. I'm picking up my guitar and writing this song into submission.
#15
Bump. Well, I used one of the progressions/riffs I wrote to try and use w/ the chorus as its own song. I think it's gonna be a really great, original alternative/prog song. I still haven't found a use for this chord progression though. Oh well, eventually I'll find something when I least expect it. Thanks for schooling me on chord naming guys, I'll try and do better in the future.
#16
Hhm, interesting progression, I'm gonna mess around in GP and see if I find anything nice, and I'll edit this post later.
#18
Well, I don't know how you play this, like, as arpeggios or what? But I found that after this chord proggression as a chorus, a verse of Dmaj7-Gmaj7-Fmaj7-B6 sounded good.