#1
Hey, it's something i've never noticed before and am just wondering if it should be like this.


I've just recently re-strung my mexi strat, and today i've noticed the bridge is (it's hard to describe in words) coming out of the guitar, the back is sticking up. Almost the tension in the strings is lifting it from the back.

Is this normal?


Thanks
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#2
Yeah well the bottom of the bridge should come out on a standard strat tremelo system. You can adjust the height of the bridge by taking the back plate off and adjusting the two screws.
#3
Quote by Aquaman788
Yeah well the bottom of the bridge should come out on a standard strat teemmelo system.



I've just checked my squier strat and it's bridge is as flat as a pancake..
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#4
Its all personal preference. If you have it flat you can bend lower but if you have it higher you can bend up as well as down.
#5
There is nothing wrong with that on a Strat vibrato bridge unless you just simply don´t like it.
#6
He just explained it worng. Take of the backplate of your guitar and you will see to big screws. Turn them clockwise until the tension pulling on the springs is equal to the tension of the strings.
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#7
Yeah, most mexican strats are factory set with about an 1/8 inch of clearance between the bridge and body. It's pretty easy to adjust the height. If you put on heavier strings it has a tendency to raise the bridge due to higher tension. Ive had to do it a couple times to my strats.
#8
So it's not an issue then? As in i shouldnt encounter any problems...?

Thanks
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#9
The only thing you need to worry about really is if it gets to high it can put stress on the bridge, and if its flat you dont want it over tightened, just enough to keep it flush with the guitar. If its too tight than this can putstress on the bridge as well.
#10
Okay thanks you lot.

I just measured the gap and it's about a 1/4 of an inch, is this too much?
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#11
Quarter is alot, but it's your preference too. I blocked mine but that's me. But you should tighten it down a bit but beware, if you do, you will need to loosen the strings first!
In the Valley of Vung
#12
Yeah I would say a quarter is a little high, it may not damage your bridge or anything, but it is really going to limit the amount you can bend down, so you cant hit as low of notes. Its better to have it a little lower than higher because you can always bend up without using the whammy bar but you need it to bend down, so the lower setting will give you a greater range of sound.
#14
Okay guys, frustration alert!


I've tightened the springs, and the bridge is lower, however now whenever i try to tune my guitar this happens.


I tune the Low E, then the A etc etc, but when i go back to check them after tuning, they are back out of tune again!

It's doing my head in, someone please help
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#15
Tune from the outside-in. When you change the tension on the bridge the other strings will go out of tune and when you tune the others it throws it all off again.

So you'd tune in the order of E-e-A-B-D-G and you'll probably have to do it a few times before you get them all in tune.
#16
Quote by Pac_man0123
Tune from the outside-in. When you change the tension on the bridge the other strings will go out of tune and when you tune the others it throws it all off again.

So you'd tune in the order of E-e-A-B-D-G and you'll probably have to do it a few times before you get them all in tune.



Still no luck

Now for some reason the bridge is back to almost a 1/4 inch and the springs are almost completely tightened!

It's like no combination of things will work, however much i tighten the springs now the bridge is still high.
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#17
This is seriously weird, the springs are now very tight yet the bridge is still sitting high!


Sorry to be a pest, it's just that i've got a coursework performance tomorrow :S
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#18
If you have the tension springs tightened that far down the odds of you lifting it off the body is not very good. You are doing something wrong! I had mine tightened all the way down with Not Even Slinky's on it and it stayed flat.

Loosen the strings, tighten it down, tighten it up and re-tune. You may need a truss rod adjustment, may need to adjust the saddles seeing how you are lowering it so much. You may just need to put new strings on it now too and start fresh!

You may just want to take it to a shop and have a guitar tech set it up right.
In the Valley of Vung
#20
Nope they're .10's, thanks for the advice guys i'll keep adjusting it tonight, if i cant do anything i've got no chocie but to take it to be set-up.

I just hope i'm not doing proper damage!
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#21
OMG this is not a big deal it is simply a matter of doing it the right way or the wrong way.

This is close:

He just explained it worng. Take of the backplate of your guitar and you will see to big screws. Turn them clockwise until the tension pulling on the springs is equal to the tension of the strings.


...but to clarify it even further you need to add something like:

He just explained it worng. Take of the backplate of your guitar and you will see to big screws. Turn them clockwise until the tension pulling on the springs is equal to the tension of the strings when the bridge is at the desired position.


First question to M_G...Do you want the bridge to float so you can pull up on the strings, or do you want it flat against the body which will provide some tuning and playing stability at the expense of being able to pull the strings sharp?
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#22
It's alright i've sorted it now, started from scratch and it appears i mustve gone wrong somwhere, i've got my bridge at a level i'm satisfied with and the tuning seems a little more stable.


(btw i remind everyone on here, two people share this account, i'm the 'stupid' one lol, so if you see me post something that sounds complex don't think my knowledge has suddenly grown it's just my friend who's alot more proficent and knowledgable with the guitar).

Thanks again everyone.
There's riddles in the shadows
They're thrown the way that i'd expect
And people never seem to know
What they least suspect is coming next
#23
Quote by M_G
Nope they're .10's, thanks for the advice guys i'll keep adjusting it tonight, if i cant do anything i've got no chocie but to take it to be set-up.

I just hope i'm not doing proper damage!


The springs lost energy (tension) when you changed strings. (Which you probably had in there a few weeks)
Add a new spring or replace all 3.
Then follow instructions: http://www.fender.com/support/manuals/pdfs/instr_owners/Stratocaster_1971.pdf