#1
ok i understand the whole concept of the circle of fifths except for when you get to F#/Gb, when you get there is F sharpened and B flattened or what? i really didn't want to make a whole thread about this but im not getting any answers about it so i'll ask you guys
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tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

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Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

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#2
I don't understand your question. In F# there are 6 sharps, and Gb: 6 flats. There are no flats in F#, if that answers your question.
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#3
whoah, thats wierd as hell. so lets say i write a song in f# major, i solo in Gb minor?
Quote by ghostnineone
i got my guitar caught in my ceiling fan today

guitars fine though
#4
whoah, thats wierd as hell. so lets say i write a song in f# major, i solo in Gb minor?

Uh...no. Where did you get that idea?
#5
Quote by Bobinedefil
whoah, thats wierd as hell. so lets say i write a song in f# major, i solo in Gb minor?

then you'd just be soloing in the minor scale of enharmonic F#M,
#6
oh wow. nvm lol. i thought that F# was Gb's relative minor or vice versa. sorry!
Quote by ghostnineone
i got my guitar caught in my ceiling fan today

guitars fine though
#7
Quote by bass-man9712
ok i understand the whole concept of the circle of fifths except for when you get to F#/Gb, when you get there is F sharpened and B flattened or what? i really didn't want to make a whole thread about this but im not getting any answers about it so i'll ask you guys


The pattern of the circle of fifths is F C G D A E B. When you get to B, you start again, only with each note sharpened. At B#, you go to an FX, etc... if going in Reverse, you add a flat moving from F back to B(b).
#8
Quote by food1010
I don't understand your question. In F# there are 6 sharps, and Gb: 6 flats. There are no flats in F#, if that answers your question.

well i got confused when i saw F#/Gb at the same part of the circle and since they are the same note it made no sense, so what your saying is when i use F# its 6 sharps and other way around for Gb?
Gotta keep my eyes from the circling skies...
tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

>CRYPTIC METAPHOR<


Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

not hated
#9
Quote by bass-man9712
well i got confused when i saw F#/Gb at the same part of the circle and since they are the same note it made no sense, so what your saying is when i use F# its 6 sharps and other way around for Gb?


The two signatures are enharmonic, that way the circle doesn't need to continue to 12sharps for B# major etc..
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
The two signatures are enharmonic, that way the circle doesn't need to continue to 12sharps for B# major etc..

ya but when i read it the first time it looked like F#/Gb hade 6#'s+6b's which would leave F sharpened and B flattened and that obviously wasnt possible and the other possiblitly was that it was natural like C, but i think i got it now thanks
Gotta keep my eyes from the circling skies...
tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

>CRYPTIC METAPHOR<


Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

not hated
#11
Every key signature could have countless enharmonic equivalent but the reason we call it Bb major not A#major (for example) is because Bb major is simpler as it only has 2 flats compared to A# major's 4 sharps and 3 double sharps.

Gb and F# are both equally simple because they have 6 flats and sharps respectively, which is why either can be used.