#1
Hey,

I've been learning some basic major/minor scales lately. I've been working on all the basic major/minors in open position. I'm using the all-guitar-chords website for the scales im working on. Other than obviously improving technique, speed, etc. what should I be getting out of this? What scales should I focus on out of the huge list? Any insights would be appreciated! I'm basically just a self-taught semi beginner with about a year or so under my belt and I'm just trying to branch out.
#2
Those scales are going to help you when it comes to improvising. Before jumping around and learning a whole slew of scales, make sure you can confidently play the ones you're learning. A good way to start is by learning the major scales in all keys and positions. When I say position, that means there is more than one way to play the scale on the fretboard. Once you've gotten those down by heart and can play them cleanly and confidently, then you'll want to learn about sequencing, which is adding melody to your playing. But for now, what you should probably do is learn those major scales really well, in all positions (not just in open position), and get really comfortable with those. Then depending on what style you want to learn (blues, rock, spanish guitar, etc.) you should look into other types of scales (for example: Spanish guitar usually uses the Spanish Gypsy scale in E). To give you somewhere to go after you've mastered the major and minor, look into pentatonic scales, blues style uses those kind.
#3
Learn the notes on the fretboard on every string. Really, once you know the notes of a particular scale you won't have to worry about positions because you can find it anywhere in octaves.
#4
TS: Remember, you're probably just learning scale patterns (I say this because you mentioned 'open position'. This is all good and well, but you need to remember scales are NOT patterns. The manifest themselves as repeating patterns all over the guitar neck, but scales are, simply put, a collection of notes.
#5
If I had to pick three scales that are absolutely worth learning inside out I would choose:
- Pentatonic minor (pretty much any rock/blues guitarists bread and butter)
- Major Scale (if you know your major scale theory is very easy to pick up and use and also the modes of the major scale are useful in their own right)
- Jazz melodic minor (this is just your major scale with a minor 3rd but once you get it down it's easy to learn it's modes which includes super locrian)

The main reason i would learn these first is because once you know all the modes of each of them there isn't a chord you cant play over.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#6
I have a similar problem. I know a few scales but i can't seem to solo or improv with them.
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#7
Quote by Zmatt
I have a similar problem. I know a few scales but i can't seem to solo or improv with them.
From my experience, if you tray and use the whole scale to start with you just get confuddled by too much choice - if you limit yourself to just the root and a couple of notes near it to start with its a lot easier. Lets you focus on rhythm and phrasing, then when you're confident you can start adding notes in, or moving to different bits of the neck, til you suddenly realised you're playing all over the neck
#8
I'm interested in this also, I've learned all of my open chords, now gotta work on Barre and Power chords, been playing for a while as well, had an instructor too, just was young and wasn't willing to put the time into it, but now that I'm older, I really wish I had applied myself...any links to the scales I should learn? thanks!
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#9
Quote by scfan919
I'm interested in this also, I've learned all of my open chords, now gotta work on Barre and Power chords, been playing for a while as well, had an instructor too, just was young and wasn't willing to put the time into it, but now that I'm older, I really wish I had applied myself...any links to the scales I should learn? thanks!



I'm the opposite I put way more time into power and barre chords then anything. But later on down I learned a couple scales, practiced them, then just played and tried to improvise, I got pretty good at it haha.
#10
Check out this lesson I stumbled upon on Youtube. It starts with nothing but a G Major scale. Please note that I have no connection with the company that made this and has lessons. I simply found it on Youtube! Helpful, though

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhiSYO4ryls
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#11
Scales help With your Understanding of Musical Keys, and Help with your technique in General. When you understand the proper Scales for whatever feel of a song you want, you know when to use what.

Say you want a Bright song? Go with major Scales.

Dark and Metal? Harmonic Minor Scales..

Weird Sounding? Augmented Scales.
#12
Dont just learn scales. Learn your intervals and how to construct the major scale. From the major scale you can derive every other scale once you know what intervals make up that scale. And you can recreate those patterns anywhere one the neck, and you dont have to remember a million positions. Know where the root note is and the intervals around it and your good to go.

Trust me its not hard at all and it will help greatly
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#13
TS, scales won't help with improving speed, scales will help you understand music.

Everything you do improves your technique, which in turn improves your speed providing you practice properly.
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#14
Don't learn scale patterns. Instead, you should learn the notes that make up a scale in various keys and come up with your own patterns using as many notes per string as you like, 3 notes are commonly used. Learn how to construct chords using the scales. Then use various techniques such as alternate picking and legato to play these scales.
Last edited by Amer91 at Sep 18, 2009,