#1
I am aware there are probably a few threads on piano stuff already, but here goes.

I really want to try and learn piano, i have considered lessons sometimes but i just don't really think i will have the time or money for it, so i thought maybe i can apply my (not amazing) knowledge of theory to piano.

Now the problem is, i can work out tunes fairly easily if they aren't too complicated, but with some peices i can't work out how some chords are formed, its quite annoying because i will get the first section of something nailed, but then hit a brick wall, i am trying to play some Debussy stuff but can only really play the first little section to Claire De Lune and could probably learn prelude to Suite Bergamasque if i tried and got my finger speed up to scratch.

Is there any way i can learn little bits and work out the rest? That is pretty much how i learnt guitar and even though it takes a bit longer, i find it more fun and interesting that way.

Also, any piano songs that are fairly simple and fun?
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Last edited by donender at Sep 7, 2009,
#2
erm. imagine by john lennon.

go to the musician talk forum and ask them to explain to you the theory of how to put together a chord.
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#4
Quote by Fenderhippie69
erm. imagine by john lennon.

go to the musician talk forum and ask them to explain to you the theory of how to put together a chord.


I know how to put chords together on guitar, i am just finding it a little difficult to apply that knowledge to piano, major and minor chords are fairly simple, but theres some other things i can't seem to get my head around.
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#5
Quote by donender
I know how to put chords together on guitar, i am just finding it a little difficult to apply that knowledge to piano, major and minor chords are fairly simple, but theres some other things i can't seem to get my head around.


like how? what can't you get your head around?
#DTWD
#6
Quote by donender
I know how to put chords together on guitar, i am just finding it a little difficult to apply that knowledge to piano, major and minor chords are fairly simple, but theres some other things i can't seem to get my head around.

if you know how to put chords together on guitar using notes rather than shapes i can't see how you can't apply that directly to piano, the notes are even easier to find
#7
Quote by primusfan
like how? what can't you get your head around?


I think its because my understanding of guitar chords is sort of a mixture of tab and chords, i know that a C# is fourth fret, E string, and the third and fifth are the sixth fret of the next two string, but then it will take me a second to work out in my head what the names of those notes are (the way i just explained it is actually a C#m i think, but hopefully you get my point).

Then i need to apply that knowledge to piano, i know all the sharps and flats are the black notes, but i can't work out how to make sharp and flat chords on piano yet, it seems too simple that sharp and flat chords are just black notes only.

Quote by Diamond Dave
if you know how to put chords together on guitar using notes rather than shapes i can't see how you can't apply that directly to piano, the notes are even easier to find


I think what i'm trying to say is i find it easier just to think of the shape rather than the notes, although i do know the notes i don't often think about each individual note if i am playing a chord.

I may not be explaining this in the most straightforward of ways, and that is because i mostly taught myself guitar, i had a few lessons but other than that i just picked up bits and peices from tabs and stuff.
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Last edited by donender at Sep 7, 2009,
#8
Piano is a fairly straightforward instrument, probably the easiest for using/learning/applying theory too.
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#9
Well each key (including black ones) is a half step, right? One key to the right of C would be the black key, or C#/Db, and the entire piano is chromatic. So if you know your intervals it's just a matter of counting keys
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#10
Quote by donender
I think its because my understanding of guitar chords is sort of a mixture of tab and chords, i know that a C# is fourth fret, E string, and the third and fifth are the sixth fret of the next two string, but then it will take me a second to work out in my head what the names of those notes are (the way i just explained it is actually a C#m i think, but hopefully you get my point).


that's a C#5. it's on the fourth fret of the A string. the sixth fret on the next two strings are the fifth and the octave. there is no third.

you just need to work on your theory a little bit more. that's all. piano's a good way to do it too.

Then i need to apply that knowledge to piano, i know all the sharps and flats are the black notes, but i can't work out how to make sharp and flat chords on piano yet, it seems too simple that sharp and flat chords are just black notes only.


well, a major scale is spelled out like this in intervals:

whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half

so let's make a sharp or flat chord:

how about a C# major?

so a major chord is made up of the 1st, 3rd and 5th scale degrees.

C# D# F F# G# A# C C#
#DTWD
#11
Quote by primusfan
that's a C#5. it's on the fourth fret of the A string. the sixth fret on the next two strings are the fifth and the octave. there is no third.

you just need to work on your theory a little bit more. that's all. piano's a good way to do it too.


well, a major scale is spelled out like this in intervals:

whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half

so let's make a sharp or flat chord:

how about a C# major?

so a major chord is made up of the 1st, 3rd and 5th scale degrees.

C# D# F F# G# A# C C#



I feel weird saying this to a mod but this belongs in the Musician talk forum.
There is a war going on for your mind.

If you are thinking, you are winning.


Resistance is victory.


We are building up a new world.
Do not sit idly by.
#12
Quote by primusfan
that's a C#5. it's on the fourth fret of the A string. the sixth fret on the next two strings are the fifth and the octave. there is no third.

you just need to work on your theory a little bit more. that's all. piano's a good way to do it too.


well, a major scale is spelled out like this in intervals:

whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half

so let's make a sharp or flat chord:

how about a C# major?

so a major chord is made up of the 1st, 3rd and 5th scale degrees.

C# D# F F# G# A# C C#


Sorry, yeah, the C would be on the A string, i was thinking of a G#, but you are right, i do need to brush up on my theory, your example actually helped me remember stuff i had completely forgotten about.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#13
Quote by Fenderhippie69
I feel weird saying this to a mod but this belongs in the Musician talk forum.


i'm a rebel without a cause.
#DTWD
#14
Quote by Fenderhippie69
I feel weird saying this to a mod but this belongs in the Musician talk forum.


Though why not help TS out while he's here?

I'll give you how chords are built, TS.

SO. Major chords are comprised of the 1st 3rd and 5th scale degrees of the root's major scale

To make it minor, lower the third a half step so it looks like : 1st, b3rd, 5th

To make the chord diminished, lower the 5th a half step as well: 1st, b3rd, b5th

To make it augmented, raise the fifth so it looks like: 1st, 3rd, #5th

To make a Dominant 7th chord, add in the flat 7th to the major chord: 1st, 3rd, 5th, b7th

Minor 7th, same thing as dominant, except add the flat 7th to the minor chord: 1st, b3rd, 5th, b7th

Half Diminished 7th's are diminished chords with the flat 7th thrown in: 1st, b3rd, b5th, b7th

FULLY Diminished 7ths are diminished chords with a double flat 7th thrown inL 1st b3rd, b5th, bb7th


That should do on chord construction for now, assuming you know your scales.
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#15
Quote by RyanDV
Piano is a fairly straightforward instrument, probably the easiest for using/learning/applying theory too.


Sure... after the first 20,000 hours or so everything just falls right into place