#2
Quote by boobinski
what is and how do u find relative minors


and what are their uses
#3
relative minors are derived from the sixth of the major key. IE the relative major of C would be Am. they contain the same notes in a different order, with the emphasis on their respective notes.

thats about it.
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#5
Quote by boobinski
what is the sisxth is the 6th of G F

6th of G is E, 6th of F is D.

EDIT:
Here, http://www.musictheory.net
It's got many useful lessons, go through them 1 by 1.
Last edited by pwrmax at Sep 7, 2009,
#6
The use of understanding relative minors is in helping you identify keys more easily, that's pretty much it.

Just be aware that they have nothing to do with making your playing more interesting, don't be fooled by that garbage people spout about "playing the relative minor" to spice things up, it's bollocks. Unless you change your chord progression you cannot "switch to the relative minor" - moving positions doesn't automatically equate to changing scales, if the notes don't change and the chords don't change then the scale doesn't change.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
The use of understanding relative minors is in helping you identify keys more easily, that's pretty much it.

Just be aware that they have nothing to do with making your playing more interesting, don't be fooled by that garbage people spout about "playing the relative minor" to spice things up, it's bollocks. Unless you change your chord progression you cannot "switch to the relative minor" - moving positions doesn't automatically equate to changing scales, if the notes don't change and the chords don't change then the scale doesn't change.

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#8
Quote by steven seagull
The use of understanding relative minors is in helping you identify keys more easily, that's pretty much it.

Just be aware that they have nothing to do with making your playing more interesting, don't be fooled by that garbage people spout about "playing the relative minor" to spice things up, it's bollocks. Unless you change your chord progression you cannot "switch to the relative minor" - moving positions doesn't automatically equate to changing scales, if the notes don't change and the chords don't change then the scale doesn't change.


so how do i find a relative minor and how does it help me with keys
#9
A Major scale and its relative minor share all the same notes - so if you know your major keys, and you know how to find the relative minor, you can work out all your minor keys so you don't have to learn them seperately.

If you take any major scale, the 6th of that major scale is the root of its relative minor - so the relative minor of C Major is C D E F G A - A minor.
#10
Quote by zhilla
A Major scale and its relative minor share all the same notes - so if you know your major keys, and you know how to find the relative minor, you can work out all your minor keys so you don't have to learn them seperately.

If you take any major scale, the 6th of that major scale is the root of its relative minor - so the relative minor of C Major is C D E F G A - A minor.



so relative minor of A major is F minor??


and do minor keys go to relative majors??
#11
Quote by boobinski
so relative minor of A major is F minor??


and do minor keys go to relative majors??
Almost - A Major has 3 sharps, F#, C# and G#, so the 6th of A Major is F# - making the relative minor F# minor

As they share the same notes, yes you can do it in reverse - the 3rd of the minor is the root of its relative major.

First thing to do is to learn the major scale itself though - so you can construct any major scale straight away, in terms of notes and intervals
#12
Quote by zhilla
Almost - A Major has 3 sharps, F#, C# and G#, so the 6th of A Major is F# - making the relative minor F# minor

As they share the same notes, yes you can do it in reverse - the 3rd of the minor is the root of its relative major.

First thing to do is to learn the major scale itself though - so you can construct any major scale straight away, in terms of notes and intervals


do you mean ionian? becuase i am working on memorizing it and making it second nature but if you could tell me how you learned the major scale and and how to construct any major scale
#13
Quote by boobinski
do you mean ionian? becuase i am working on memorizing it and making it second nature but if you could tell me how you learned the major scale and and how to construct any major scale
Ionian mode is for all intents and purposes the major scale - it has the same root, it has the same interval structure - but the names are normally used depending on context. If you are playing tonal music you'd generally refer to the major scale, if you were playing modal music you'd be more likely to refer to it as ionian mode.

By construct it I mean know it in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th, Perfect 5th, Maj 6th, Maj 7th, and notes - so you can quickly spell out any major scale, and play it in any key in any position/direction on the neck. Ideally I'd learn to harmonise the scale as well before getting into modes, purely because modes can be derived from the major scale, so the better understanding you have of the major scale the easier it will be to understand modes.
#14
Quote by zhilla
Ionian mode is for all intents and purposes the major scale - it has the same root, it has the same interval structure - but the names are normally used depending on context. If you are playing tonal music you'd generally refer to the major scale, if you were playing modal music you'd be more likely to refer to it as ionian mode.

By construct it I mean know it in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), intervals (Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th, Perfect 5th, Maj 6th, Maj 7th, and notes - so you can quickly spell out any major scale, and play it in any key in any position/direction on the neck. Ideally I'd learn to harmonise the scale as well before getting into modes, purely because modes can be derived from the major scale, so the better understanding you have of the major scale the easier it will be to understand modes.


thanks alot zhilla youve been following all of my posts answering all of my questions
its appreciated

so ive got the steps of the major scale WWHWWWH

now i need to know the intervals,, what are they and all that
#15
"Almost - A Major has 3 sharps, F#, C# and G#, so the 6th of A Major is F# - making the relative minor F# minorAs they share the same notes,"

How do they have the same notes if A minor has sharps & flats
#16
Quote by Thepredster
"Almost - A Major has 3 sharps, F#, C# and G#, so the 6th of A Major is F# - making the relative minor F# minorAs they share the same notes,"

How do they have the same notes if A minor has sharps & flats

C major = C D E F G A B
6th of C Major is A
A minor = A B C D E F G - same notes as C, but different root/tonal centre

A Major = A B C# D E F# G#
6th of A Major is F#
F# minor = F# G# A B C# D E - same notes as A Major, but different root/tonal centre

And you won't get a Major or minor key with sharps and flats - they'll either have sharps or flats - thank goodness!

@Boobinski - no worries Watch Freepower's theory vids - one at a time, only moving on when you've understood what you've learnt so far. They cover all the basics in an easy to understand way, in bitesize chunks. Get the basics nailed and you're off to a great start, as everything else builds on them.
#17
"F# minor = F# G# A B C# D E - same notes as A Major, but different root/tonal centre

And you won't get a Major or minor key with sharps and flats"

did you contradict or am i being slow
#18
Quote by Thepredster
"F# minor = F# G# A B C# D E - same notes as A Major, but different root/tonal centre

And you won't get a Major or minor key with sharps and flats"

did you contradict or am i being slow
You said A minor had sharps AND flats - I just meant that you'd have one or the other (either sharps OR flats) - or none in the case of A minor (its all naturals) - not both at once.