#1
What determines a songs "key"? Sorry if its int the wrong section or a noob question
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#2
Quote by d4man
What determines a songs "key"? Sorry if its int the wrong section or a noob question


The way it sounds (I.E. notes in it)
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#3
OK, since the first arpeggiated (sp) chord in Three Doors Down, Kryptonite is a B minor does that mean the song is in B Minor? If I wanted to improv a solo for that soloing would it have to be in B Minor?
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Last edited by d4man at Sep 8, 2009,
#4
You improv a solo in the key that the particular part is in. For example, Californication by RHCP is basically in A-minor... but the solo is in A-Major (F-minor, take your pick), so you would have to play it in A-major at that part.
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#5
Quote by d4man
OK, since the first arpeggiated (sp) chord in Three Doors Down, Kryptonite is a B minor does that mean the song is in B Minor? If I wanted to improv a solo for that soloing would it have to be in B Minor?



You could use B Minor, indeed.

You could also use D Major, but you'll learn about that later.
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#6
Quote by d4man
OK, since the first arpeggiated (sp) chord in Three Doors Down, Kryptonite is a B minor does that mean the song is in B Minor? If I wanted to improv a solo for that soloing would it have to be in B Minor?
Not necessarily - you can't assume the first chord is the key of the song. Sometimes it is, but a lot of the time its not. To work out the key you need to know what the song resolves to (what chord it feels finished on - and while this is often the last chord, you can't rely on that either), and to work out what scale to use you need to know what other chords/notes are in the song.

Do you know what other chords are in it?

Quote by LordPino
You could use B Minor, indeed.

You could also use D Major, but you'll learn about that later.
If it is in B minor you wouldn't use D Major over it - you'd use B minor. D Major resolves to D, and would sound odd and unfinished over a B minor chord progression. Having the same notes doesn't make them the same scale any more than dog and god mean the same thing because they use the same letters.
Last edited by zhilla at Sep 8, 2009,
#7
The chord progression for 3 Doors Down - Kryptonite goes like this...B Minor, Partial Open G, Partial Open A..all arpeggios of course until the song gets rolling at which point the above chords get strummed in the background.

I was just curious. If its too difficult for a semi beginner to learn, I will worry about it later. I'm sure my guitar teacher will cover it eventually.
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#8
If you've got a G and and an A you've got two Major chords next to each other (next to each other in the scale that is), so assuming for the moment its a major scale they are probably the IV and V chords.

Which would give you D Major

But you haven't got a D chord in there, so its not resolving to D.

The relative minor of D Major is B minor - this means they share all the same notes and chords, but they are used differently.

You've got a Bm chord, so assuming it sounds finished if you end on a Bm, its in B minor.

Which means you can use B minor or B minor pentatonic over it.

If you learn how to harmonise the major scale by stacking 3rds, and understand how the natural minor is related to the major scale, that should give you enough knowledge to determine what key a song is in - provided it is in a single major or minor key that is. A lot of songs change keys, or borrow chords form other keys, so don't worry if you come across some you can't work out. It just means you don't have the knowledge to work them out yet.
#9
Wow great reply....it all makes more sense now. I have alot to learn
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#10
Start with the major scale. Get that nailed so you understand how its constructed in terms of notes and intervals, and learn how to harmonise it, and you'll find all the other scales (and a lot of other theory) suddenly makes sense. You can derive pretty much any scale you'll ever use form the major scale