#1
Ok. I'm an intermediate level guitarist. Can construct solos can construct basic song structure. Pretty decent technique. Not so speedy though. So here's the question.

At this point of time, should I concentrate on my technique first? Try to play at a desired tempo and clean. Tighten up my tapping, sweep etc etc or should I rather concentrate on music theory. Learn how to use various exotic notes, arpeggios basically stuff different than what I use now.
So technique or theory?

I generally use major, minor and pentatonic scales to construct solos.

Guidance will be appreciated.
#3
it depends what your goals as a guitarist are.

but i would tell you to practice, as much as you can. learn as much techniques as you can, practice is important.

knowing stuff like chords and scales and all that is helpful, but what good is does it do you if you cant apply it.
#5
both. if you study theory learn to read and do ear training.
however, its better to have a grasp of theory (functional harmony not just tehMOD3ZZZZZZZ) theory is more then shapes and its better to have it down cold if you have decent technique (can play cleanly and in time) then have great technique but poor knowledge of theory and bad musicianship (which includes both reading, keeping good time and a good ear) like so many people on this forum do. But really both, spend time learning new theory stuff (starting with the major scale and functional harmoney) and also spend time applying it in all 5 positions and all 12 keys with a metronome. But both theory and technique are just means to an end, its most important to enjoy yourself and make sure you play real music (songs, pieces, tunes whatever you call it) every day in addition to technique and theory to keep from becoming a mediocre sounding musically insensitive robot. But for technique, theres no point in only learning your scales in one key and several positions. practice scales daily in 12 keys and 5 positions (or if you dont have tons of time all 5 positions in one key and then one position for the other keys), it only takes about 20 minutes to run your major scale in every key each day and will help your technique, your knowledge of the instrument and your ear tremendously.
#6
Neither technique or theory on its own is a means to an end. If you sit and practice technique for 24 hours a day, you'll eventually be a great player, but a shitty person to jam with and a bad songwriter. If you only study theory, you'll know everything, but won't be able to accurately express it through the instrument.

The only solution is both. Learn theory, and apply it to your guitar playing while you learn.
#7
Quote by Heminator89
Ok. I'm an intermediate level guitarist. Can construct solos can construct basic song structure. Pretty decent technique. Not so speedy though. So here's the question.

At this point of time, should I concentrate on my technique first? Try to play at a desired tempo and clean. Tighten up my tapping, sweep etc etc or should I rather concentrate on music theory. Learn how to use various exotic notes, arpeggios basically stuff different than what I use now.
So technique or theory?

I generally use major, minor and pentatonic scales to construct solos.

Guidance will be appreciated.


Concentrate on music, and all that is involved. Listen to it, appreciate it, study it, learn it, play it, enjoy it.

Work on things that are realistic for your skill & knowledge levels. Be patient & enjoy the experience.


If your having a hard time on your own, start taking lessons.
shred is gaudy music
#8
What i tend to do is study a bunch of theory early in the morning when i wake up, or just maybe after a nap or something....to get the brain moving again. Then I go jam and apply that theory to my jamming for a good couple of hours. Maybe find a tab that involves what you just learned in a lesson, and try to jam that if you can't think of how to apply it...that is a good way cause there have been times I understood something but just couldn't figure out how to apply it...then i found a song i knew that used it and it all made sense
#10
Neither... both should be developed equally... and guitarmunky's post is good advice too
#11
There are some really good suggestions in this thread, and I think Guitar Munky's and TimeConsumer09's posts especially hit the nail on the head.

At this stage in my guitar life, I'm working on learning some really difficult songs that are hard enough that I must develop as a guitarist in order to play. This feeds both the theory and the technique beast. I will take a lick that I am learning and figure out what key and scale it is using. Then I will learn to improvise in that key or scale if I don't already know how to. Or I will take some device that is used in that lick, and improvise using that device. Or just take the start and end notes of a lick, and improvise licks starting and ending on the same notes to explore the feel they give me. Or play the first half of the lick, then improvise the second half to find different routes to the ending note. And on the technique side, if I find I can't play the lick as well as I would like, I get a lot of technique work in getting it to where I can.
#12
Usually how many hours during a day do you play your guitar?I think it all depends on that!Both technique and theory are important to make riffs..But usually, if i play 3 hours a day, i spend 1 hour to repeat my theory and to apply it to the guitar, then the other 2 hours i improve my technique..but without the knowledge, i think nothing can be improved. When i first start playing my guitar, i was doing exercises found on the web, and i was doing them quite good. But after that, without knowing what i was doing, i was just a guy doing a riff correctly..even if the riff was great and hard, i wasn't a guitarist at all!

Can you tell us what's your theory level? with the information i have got now, i think that, if you don't do that already, you should learn the connections between the scales, so you can use all of the guitar's nek!