#1
Hi

I've been playing the bass for a little less than three months. I can play basslines from a lot of different bands like RHCP, Stone Temple Pilots, Pearl Jam, etc.

I have one problem. I have a hard time trying to find the right technique to muting strings. A lot of times while playing a song I find that the strings I am not playing are ringing.

I want to prevent the other strings from ringing, so can anyone recommend me any muting techniques? Thanks in advance!
#3
Quote by NyM_KalaHi
Try resting your thumb on the string below the one that you're playing on.

that doesn't stop strings above him from ringing..

Work on your left hand technique. If you have extra fingers, use them to mute strings that are ringing (my resting them on the ringers).
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#4
Quote by lordofthefood1
that doesn't stop strings above him from ringing..

Work on your left hand technique. If you have extra fingers, use them to mute strings that are ringing (my resting them on the ringers).

What do you mean by extra fingers? Like having a sixth finger? (that would be pretty badass)
Quote by RPGoof
I've killed many, many people.
They respawn though


Quote by the humanity
jazz bass.

t-bird is muddy inversatile, and reminds me of emo chicks.

Current rig: Peavey Millennium 5 - Drive B15

To buy: Ampeg BA112 or BA115
#5
Yes, if you are a mutant and have +5 fingers it's easy.

Or then he means that if you don't use all 4(thumb doesn't count) then you could use the fingers that don't play to mute.
#6
You could use the fingers on your left that you arent using, or you can use the pink on right hand to lightly mute strings you arent using. Also when finger playing you let the finger you pluck with fall back on the string above it to mute it
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#7
Are the strings you're most worried about above the string you're playing or below. I would guess below, in which case, that's an issue of two things, A) knowing which notes will cause sympathetic vibrations. The answer to that is: a lot of them, however the ones that will cause the strongest ones that you'll actually noticed and be perturbed by are the same as your strings' notes. EADG. So if you play, for example, A on the G string your A will ring out as well. I'm making a point of this because it's almost impossible to be moving your right hand or left hand around while playing to mute every string at all times. That's why you have to have a knowledge of which notes are going to ring.
With that knowledge you can kind of devise a right hand technique that allows you to let a finger fall on the string you need to be muting. Personally I use one that has my ring finger muting the E and A string and then my ring muting the D (I need to mute the D because I have a high C so the follow through from my stroke does not mute it, but that's irrelevant to your situation).

Anyway, I hope that helped a little bit.
#8
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Are the strings you're most worried about above the string you're playing or below. I would guess below, in which case, that's an issue of two things, A) knowing which notes will cause sympathetic vibrations. The answer to that is: a lot of them, however the ones that will cause the strongest ones that you'll actually noticed and be perturbed by are the same as your strings' notes. EADG. So if you play, for example, A on the G string your A will ring out as well. I'm making a point of this because it's almost impossible to be moving your right hand or left hand around while playing to mute every string at all times. That's why you have to have a knowledge of which notes are going to ring.
With that knowledge you can kind of devise a right hand technique that allows you to let a finger fall on the string you need to be muting. Personally I use one that has my ring finger muting the E and A string and then my ring muting the D (I need to mute the D because I have a high C so the follow through from my stroke does not mute it, but that's irrelevant to your situation).

Anyway, I hope that helped a little bit.


This the best piece of advice so far.

I'd just like to add that effective muting comes from various different methods. I personally use my thumb on my plucking hand, any spare fingers on my fretting hand, and, in extreme cases, my thumb of my fretting hand over the top of the neck.

Learn them all and incorporate them into to all your playing.

x
Fender Geddy Lee Jazz
Warwick Corvette $$
Rockbass Streamer Fretless
Hartke HA5000
SWR Triad

Quote by Victory2134
I happen to enjoy every mankiss from shinhoman.