#1
So, simply, I'm working on a home recording. I lack the funds for a bass rig. But I read that Jack White used a Digitech Whammy to make his guitar sound like a bass on various White Stripes songs, notably Seven Nation Army one of the bigger hits amongst them. Eventually I intend to actually buy a bass rig, but can't afford it for now and if it's good enough for a hit #1 single it's good enough for a guy working on self-recorded material in his basement.

So essentially, should I purchase a microphone that doesn't make my recordings sound like crap or an octave pedal that'll let me record bass parts first?
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#2
How much recording are you doing? Do you have an adequate interface and a crappy mic, or are both crappy?

Ps he uses the Whammy to go up, and a POG to go down. Look into one of those.
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#3
Quote by Sid McCall
How much recording are you doing? Do you have an adequate interface and a crappy mic, or are both crappy?


At the moment; Just what I have to due to the mic. I've been writing a lot of stuff though and after watching some stuff by Rob Chappers on youtube I really want to record some of it and get some opinions from some people at local indie labels who work with a record shop I dearly love on whether or not I could get them to distribute and sell it.

For the interface, I've got an M-audio USB interface on the hardware end and a copy of Sony Acid Music Studio on the software side of things, which also works as a drum machine, so I'd say the interface is at least good for home recordings. The mic is very much crappy, it's the $25 USB one included with the Rock Band instrument pack I got a year ago *Flameshield up*.

The only real mic I've tested it with is a Shure PG48, and even then not only is it's frequency response too high to pick up anything much lower than a guitar clearly(Lowest output of an E-tuned guitar; 80Hz. PG48 lowest; 70Hz), which if I understand things right(Quite possible I don't since I'm a beginner with mics) would cause issues with the bass tracks, but also it didn't include an XLR cable but instead a 1/4" cable which, while great with my band, is an issue since the interface apparently expects to pick up much more powerful output from the guitar line-in jack than the microphone picks up, so anything it picks up is overly quiet.

Ps he uses the Whammy to go up, and a POG to go down. Look into one of those.


Well, being poor I wasn't actually looking at a whammy since I can't bring myself to spend $200 on a pedal I'll only use for recording bass tracks most likely. I was actually looking at an Electro-Harmonix Octave Multiplexer, which, while not the same, being another analogue EHX octave pedal I assume would get closer to the same quality. I have been looking into the POG though, if I could afford one I'd absolutely love it.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39
Last edited by necrosis1193 at Sep 9, 2009,
#5
if you really want some bass in your songs, just buy a bass (ibanez makes good basses for fairly cheap). basses work quite well going straight in without going through an amp head or anything. that way you dont have to worry all that much about the frequency response of the mic as only the bass and drums should be hanging out in the extreme low end.

for the mic, look into some decent large diaphragm condensers. those work well on vocals and most instruments that aren't sitting in the crazy high end. that would be a huge step up from what you have now, and would be plenty to get you some decent sounding recordings and hold you over till you get a better idea of what works with your songs and style. if you give me a budget, i can toss some mic suggestions your way. also what would you be using them for? (eg. acoustic, cabs, banjo...)
#6
Quote by sandyman323
if you really want some bass in your songs, just buy a bass (ibanez makes good basses for fairly cheap). basses work quite well going straight in without going through an amp head or anything. that way you dont have to worry all that much about the frequency response of the mic as only the bass and drums should be hanging out in the extreme low end.

for the mic, look into some decent large diaphragm condensers. those work well on vocals and most instruments that aren't sitting in the crazy high end. that would be a huge step up from what you have now, and would be plenty to get you some decent sounding recordings and hold you over till you get a better idea of what works with your songs and style. if you give me a budget, i can toss some mic suggestions your way. also what would you be using them for? (eg. acoustic, cabs, banjo...)

+1

Great advice all round
#7
Quote by sandyman323
if you really want some bass in your songs, just buy a bass (ibanez makes good basses for fairly cheap). basses work quite well going straight in without going through an amp head or anything. that way you dont have to worry all that much about the frequency response of the mic as only the bass and drums should be hanging out in the extreme low end.


Hmm...well, I actually work at a local music shop that's owned by Guitar Center(Meaning I also get a discount at GC), so will look into the basses next time I'm at work or Guitar Center, as well as the few local pawnshops there are.

for the mic, look into some decent large diaphragm condensers. those work well on vocals and most instruments that aren't sitting in the crazy high end. that would be a huge step up from what you have now, and would be plenty to get you some decent sounding recordings and hold you over till you get a better idea of what works with your songs and style. if you give me a budget, i can toss some mic suggestions your way. also what would you be using them for? (eg. acoustic, cabs, banjo...)


Hmm...budget preferably no more than $75 since this computer's primary cooling fan sounds like it's dying so I need money aside to replace it if it goes, but depending on the quality I may be able to splurge to $100. Also keep in mind that whatever the price I get 20% off due to an employee discount. As for what I'd be using it for, various things, but mainly vocals in the bass/baritone/lower tenor singing ranges, guitars both electric(Mainly a strat though also a tele and PRS copy) and acoustic(A dreadnought I believe) in either E, Eb or Open G, and, if I can actually figure out how to play more than subpar improvised lines on it, a harmonica.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39
#8
Quote by necrosis1193
Hmm...well, I actually work at a local music shop that's owned by Guitar Center(Meaning I also get a discount at GC), so will look into the basses next time I'm at work or Guitar Center, as well as the few local pawnshops there are.


Hmm...budget preferably no more than $75 since this computer's primary cooling fan sounds like it's dying so I need money aside to replace it if it goes, but depending on the quality I may be able to splurge to $100


Sensible - no point spending all your money on a high quality mic just so it can pick up the constant hissing of your computer

The Samson C01U is the only cheap condenser I can vouch for, but tons of other companies now have similar offerings in the same price range (and, of course, Behringer do one even cheaper).
If you already have a mic interface your choice is slightly extended, but will mostly be the non-USB counterparts of the same mics. Google Product Search is your friend!
#9
Quote by kyle62
Sensible - no point spending all your money on a high quality mic just so it can pick up the constant hissing of your computer

The Samson C01U is the only cheap condenser I can vouch for, but tons of other companies now have similar offerings in the same price range (and, of course, Behringer do one even cheaper).
If you already have a mic interface your choice is slightly extended, but will mostly be the non-USB counterparts of the same mics. Google Product Search is your friend!


Aye, I do have an interface actually, so XLR mics are very much acceptable. Using musicians friend these two were the main ones that were $75 or less that interested me, heading to Google Product Search to look for more though.

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Nady-SCM-900-Condenser-Mic?sku=277123

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Nady-SPC10-Large-Diaphragm-Condenser-Mic?sku=277067

There was also a Shure, but it was a dynamic mic, and form what I've heard from what little I can understand of the tech talk being a rookie with recording gear, condenser > dynamic for studio work, but considering the SM57 I figure it deserves mention too;

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Shure-PG57XLR-Instrument-Microphone-?sku=270288
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 3-3
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 52-39