#1
So i'm sitting here reading about how Jimi Hendrix played 10-38 strings.
Then i read that Stevie Ray Vaughan used 13-56 strings.
They both played Strats. They both tuned their guitars a half a step down. And they both had pretty much the same exact playing style.
So why did each have such different gauges in strings?

I read that heavier strings are harder to bend. So why would Stevie prefer his strings to be so heavy?
After all, Stevie loved to bend when he played.

Why are lighter strings easier to bend?
I'm learning some solos right now, that require fast bending. I would imagine that with lighter strings, it would be easier for your finger to slip off the string while bending.
And with heavier strings, i always thought it would be easier.

Can someone explain this to me?
Sorry that i don't know such basic details.
#3
Quote by deathbullet86
And they both had pretty much the same exact playing style.

Heh.


Lighter strings are easier to bend, and it gets easier the longer you play/ the more you bend. 9-42 should be good.

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Last edited by jthm_guitarist at Sep 9, 2009,
#4
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Heh.


Lighter strings are easier to bend, and it gets easier the longer you play/ the more you bend. 9-42 should be good.

yeah 9-42 will be a good starting point for you, if its too light you can always go to 10s, if its too hard to bend then practice more
#5
Quote by samlocke14
yeah 9-42 will be a good starting point for you, if its too light you can always go to 10s, if its too hard to bend then practice more


I find for lead work and bending 9's are awesome.
I have 10's on my LP and that's fine for some lead stuff...but a fair bit harder

Go 9-42's for now
The gear:

* Epiphone Les Paul Custom
* Schecter Jeff Loomis Signature 7 String
* Fender Squier P Bass
* Blackstar Stage HT-60
* Original Crybaby
* EHX Small Clone
* Boss DD-3
#6
Thanks for all the "Feedback", guys.

Ok, I think i'm gonna try 9-42's.

Thanks again, I really appreciate the information.
#7
Quote by deathbullet86
Thanks for all the "Feedback", guys.

Ok, I think i'm gonna try 9-42's.

Thanks again, I really appreciate the information.

oh btw if you find that the lower strings on the 9-42 set are too floppy, some companies make 9-46 sets so you still have the thiner high strings for solos, but a bit more thickness on the lower strings. might be something to keep in mind
#8
Technique Strings

Bending can be done on all gauges...

Sure it's going to be easier on lighter gauges though
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#10
Quote by deathbullet86
Thanks for all the "Feedback", guys.

Ok, I think i'm gonna try 9-42's.

Thanks again, I really appreciate the information.


Oh yeah btw
Try super slinky's
Slinkys = awesome
IMO of course



BTW the reason stevie played heavy strings was because:

A) he was a freak - he had really strong hands...13's will rip 90% of guitarist's hands to shreds
B) Heavier strings are sometimes said to give you a fuller tone

IMO heavier strings are only useful for downtuning. I put 11-52's on my LP recently - awesome for drop C but I don't play in it enough...they're too rough for standard
The gear:

* Epiphone Les Paul Custom
* Schecter Jeff Loomis Signature 7 String
* Fender Squier P Bass
* Blackstar Stage HT-60
* Original Crybaby
* EHX Small Clone
* Boss DD-3
Last edited by hendrixftw at Sep 9, 2009,
#13
Why has nobody yet mentioned that there is a vast tonal difference between 9s and 13s? Playing on the 13s is how SRV managed to get that fat tone out of a strat.
#14
What kind of guitar do you have? Scale can also play a large part in how certain strings feel. For example I Typically play in either E or Eb standard and I string my guitar with 11-48s because I have a shorter scale guitar (24 3/4). For me Tuning 10s to Eb on my guitar just feels floppy (I also like a little extra bite to my strings though, helps with quicker picking). IMO you're just gonna have to try out a few strings and find out what suits you best. It's all about finding the right balance when it comes to your strings.
#15
Quote by michal23
Why has nobody yet mentioned that there is a vast tonal difference between 9s and 13s? Playing on the 13s is how SRV managed to get that fat tone out of a strat.
True dat. I put 13's on a strat one time and the straight up tone into my Pro Jr was awesome. But I couldn't handle strings that heavy.
#16
Im usin 12s down half a step (i think) on my hagstrom hollowbodied guitar and they're pretty tense but not overly so tbh. I've tuned 12s on that up to F# before aswell, that's when it gets hard to play :P

I suggest you get some 11s, stevie ray used 13s cus they just sound thick and awesome on that strat, some people use thin ones like 8s though and can still get a great tone (billy gibbons uses 8s, frank zappa used 8s or 7s at times).


Also stevie ray once said he wanted it to feel like he was fighting the guitar or something.


EDIT: all the people here saying heavy strings are only good for downtuning, it ain't true. If you set your guitar up right and build your finger strength then you'll be fine.
Last edited by Zoot Allures at Sep 9, 2009,
#17
If you're starting, 9-42 is good for you.
It's been 3 months since i put 10's on my Les Paul, i can't feel the difference while i'm bending, but i'm loving the tone, it's amazing
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#18
i have 11/49's on my LP tuned down Eb or D standard.
if I were you, I would at least go with 10's, build up your strength in your hands and decide if you want to go down to 9's. Being so light, it has a "thin" sound
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