#1
Hi.
I started playing about 8 months ago, and ican't play anything faster.
I can't do any fast solos.
And i'm not talking shred/metal type stuf,i'm talikng about stuff like GnR.
Can any one here suggest anythng to help me improve my speed?
#2
IMO the best way to learn to play faster is to completely foget about speed, and focus on playing everything cleanly and accurately - get your fretting and picking hands nice and coordinated, sort your muting out and work on economy of motion, and you'll suddenly find you're naturally playing things a lot faster. Try and force speed and you are in danger of playing fast and sloppy.
#3
ok well first off you can't fully expect to play solos so soon. Second each person takes a different amount of time to learn and progress. Hell it took paul Gilbert 8 years till he knew how to strum the right way and now look at him.

But if you want to improve speed learn those kind of songs at a slower pace to know what you are to be playing but don't use the metronome too much. A guy named tom hess (look him up on youtube) who is just brilliant said not to always use it and kind of challenge yourself and you will learn from those mistakes and keep playing.
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#5
Quote by bfredder92
But if you want to improve speed learn those kind of songs at a slower pace to know what you are to be playing but don't use the metronome too much.

Wrong. Use the metronome as much as possible. It is an incredible asset to any musician.

To TS, don't concern yourself with playing fast. Speed is a byproduct of accuracy. Work on playing clean before you try to play fast. What sounds better: A fast, messy solo, or a slow, clean solo?
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#6
Quote by bfredder92
A guy named tom hess (look him up on youtube) who is just brilliant


Seriously? Tom Hess is brilliant now? wow.....
#8
Quote by Firebirdz
Actually, i dont own a mteronome
I have no idea how to use one.
There are free metronomes online - accuracy is dependent on your internet link though. It basically does the same job as tapping your foot to hold the beat, but much much more accurately.
#9
^Or go pay Guitar Center (or local equivalent) a visit. You can get one for $20 or less, and it will be the best $20 you have ever spent for your development as a musician.

About playing fast. The best thing to do is just forget about it. Seriously. Explore a wide range of material, work on playing everything as cleanly and convincingly as possible, and the speed will just sort of creep up on you without you noticing.
Last edited by se012101 at Sep 9, 2009,
#11
Think about it this way: Your speed is fine. Anyone can play guitar very fast, they'll just miss about 90% of the notes and be very sloppy. Your problem is accuracy while playing fast. Theres no such thing as practicing speed; only accuracy.
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#13
Quote by eddievanzant
unless they actually can't play fast, which is a problem for some people.


I think this problem is more in the mind than in the fingers TBH

Our hands are all built the same.
#14
Metronomes should help you but they don't help everybody... I've never used one (well, i have.. it just wasn't helping.)
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#15
Dude, you've only been at it for 8 months.....I didn't learn my first solo until year 3...not saying you can't learn one faster, but take it slow and it will come on its own.
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#16
The only thing you CAN do is to play the solo at a comfortable speed, then work your way up to the actual speed. Make sure you're muting the unused strings so that you don't only improve speed, but accuracy as well.
#17
Quote by chainsawguitar
I think this problem is more in the mind than in the fingers TBH

Our hands are all built the same.

i think it depends on the person really. i've noticed the problem mostly in left handed people who pick wiith their right hand. normally you should be able to tremolo at least over 200 bpm, but sometimes your hand won't move fast than 100bpm in which case you are f'd in the a and might as well pick up flute
#18
I've only been playing for 5 months. I think, like the others here have said, that you should not be thinking about speed. I never think to myself "Man, I need to play this fast." At first, just memorize the notes and play them in the correct time. Just keep doing it over and over and you'll gradually notice that it gets easier for you to do it. Eventually, you'll notice that your actually able to do it pretty quickly.

A metro is probably a good idea. I only use one once in a while, and probably should do it more. I always try to "memorize" the tempo/speed of a song by listening to the original. I'm sure as I get better and play more advanced pieces of music that I'll have to use a metronome more.
#19
Quote by eddievanzant
i think it depends on the person really. i've noticed the problem mostly in left handed people who pick wiith their right hand. normally you should be able to tremolo at least over 200 bpm, but sometimes your hand won't move fast than 100bpm in which case you are f'd in the a and might as well pick up flute


no, with practice you can increase speed. I don't believe that anyone just "can't" because of any reason.

Anyone can learn how to do it.

Oh and I've taught left handed people on right handed guitars, the only difference is that they tend to make different movements in error- they make different mistakes. Doesn't stop them from learning how to do it correctly.