#2
Session guitarists need to be ridiculously good to be even remotely employable.
Ego inflating praise here:
Quote by Fishyesque
That is SOOOOOOOOOOO sig worthy! Pure awesomeness to you, sir.

C wut I did thar Fishy?

's UG
#3
There are tonnes of these threads really, and the chances are you're not good enough, they have to know alot and be able to play extremely well.
Blog Of Awesome UGers.
Quote by OddOneOut
I seem to attract girls.
Which is annoying, cos I'm a girl and I like cock.

Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Being an idiot should be illegal too.
#6
Quote by dgme92
Session guitarists need to be ridiculously good to be even remotely employable.

This.
Better than anybody you know the name of.
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You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

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Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

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I can fap to this. Keep going.
#7
You need to be a level 65 guitarist then you evolve into session guitarist.
signature
#8
You have to slaughter wild boars using only your music for over seven weeks before you can even hope to try.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#9
Just basic powerchords and stuff; it's not that hard
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
...to make sure I don't get too far"
#10
i am one. this thread feeds my ego, continue...
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id like to shave my balls, but i always cut myself and when i do my shaver is like om nom nom testicle skin.
#11
You need to be stupid good and connected to get anywhere in the session game.

Put it this way- if you work session for Stevie Wonder, you will be expected to play any of the set's songs, at a different tempo and a different feel, in a different key on command.

That's how good.
#12
Quote by Deliriumbassist
You need to be stupid good and connected to get anywhere in the session game.

Put it this way- if you work session for Stevie Wonder, you will be expected to play any of the set's songs, at a different tempo and a different feel, in a different key on command.

That's how good.

Pfft I know someone who could do that blindfolded

...I suck.
Blog Of Awesome UGers.
Quote by OddOneOut
I seem to attract girls.
Which is annoying, cos I'm a girl and I like cock.

Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Being an idiot should be illegal too.
#13
Quote by nimrod_hahahaha
i am one. this thread feeds my ego, continue...

Nah, you can do it TS. It's not as hard as it seems.


[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#15
Quote by Bullet-Rule
You need to be a level 65 guitarist then you evolve into session guitarist.


and thats without rare candy!!

EDIT:

Quote by barden1069
Just basic powerchords and stuff; it's not that hard


You best be trolling.
It has come to my recent attention that our good friend CoreysMonster is not permanently detained in the Fotb.

i would like to make an apology to the following people:


that is all.

I use Linux
Last edited by metalmanjosip at Sep 9, 2009,
#16
they have to be able to play what there given almost instantly
Gotta keep my eyes from the circling skies...
tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

>CRYPTIC METAPHOR<


Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

not hated
#17
To be a session guitarist you have to be so good, that to meet one in the flesh would cause your eyes and ears to melt away from your head as they sight read "The Extremist - Joe Satriani"...

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#18
If you can play Smoke on the Water, you can be a session guitarist.
Goodness gracious me!
#19
Get given nothing but a chord chart, follow a song on the spot with no time to practice.


Honestly session players are the best in the world.
Youtube covers

[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/MrJumboHumbo[/URL"]
#20
Quote by metalmanjosip
and thats without rare candy!!

EDIT:


You best be trolling.

noooo wai!!!!
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
...to make sure I don't get too far"
#21
Essentially, you need to know nearly everything there is to know about musical theory. As far as playing goes, maybe they don't need to be like Steve Vai or anything but they need to be able to apply that theory to their instrument on-demand
#22
Okay, as someone who is at a modern music college (BIMM Bristol) and has been taught about session guitarists by actual session guitarists, here's what the situation is in the UK.

It's a term that is almost never used by the people who are labelled as such. They generally refer to themselves as "freelance musicians" unless you are a session player in Nashville (good luck with that), where you would work a 9 to 5 split into 3 sessions per day.

Or you might do work with a musical show in the pit, where you would have to read charts varying in specificity - for example, a guy called Neville Marten has recalled a show where he was even given amp and pickup settings for each section of a song.

The majority of freelance musicans aren't clocking in a studio every day like they did in the 60s - that has pretty much died out. Basically, you gain as many contacts as you can who will give you session work, all while you're maybe in a band/function band/teaching etc. "Session work" could be to play in Stevie Wonder's backing band, for which you would require the aforementioned level of skill, or it could be just bouncing around up-and-coming bands, helping them with tours etc (for which interpersonal skills and a reliable base of playing is much more important than being able to shred or whatever). Or it could be that someone asks you to play on a film score - many session players have got their foot in the door by doing a project with a new young director who then got big. Or it could be that someone asks if you could engineer an album for them based on something of yours they'd heard. Or it could be that a television company wants you to play on an advert or TV series.

I say that they would want you, but that comes after years of bandying about, basically doing musical odd jobs, surviving on that long enough and building a reputation good enough.

An example of how tight-knit the music industry is: one of my teachers at BIMM is Kieron Pepper. He was the live drummer for The Prodigy from 1997-2007, so knows Liam Howlett pretty well. Liam Howlett knows Madonna. If Madonna was looking for a drummer in The Prodigy's kind of style, she would ask Howlett if he knew anybody, and he might recommend Kieron. That's basically how sessions work.
#23
Quote by blue_strat
Okay, as someone who is at a modern music college (BIMM Bristol) and has been taught about session guitarists by actual session guitarists, here's what the situation is in the UK.

It's a term that is almost never used by the people who are labelled as such. They generally refer to themselves as "freelance musicians" unless you are a session player in Nashville (good luck with that), where you would work a 9 to 5 split into 3 sessions per day.

Or you might do work with a musical show in the pit, where you would have to read charts varying in specificity - for example, a guy called Neville Marten has recalled a show where he was even given amp and pickup settings for each section of a song.

The majority of freelance musicans aren't clocking in a studio every day like they did in the 60s - that has pretty much died out. Basically, you gain as many contacts as you can who will give you session work, all while you're maybe in a band/function band/teaching etc. "Session work" could be to play in Stevie Wonder's backing band, for which you would require the aforementioned level of skill, or it could be just bouncing around up-and-coming bands, helping them with tours etc (for which interpersonal skills and a reliable base of playing is much more important than being able to shred or whatever). Or it could be that someone asks you to play on a film score - many session players have got their foot in the door by doing a project with a new young director who then got big. Or it could be that someone asks if you could engineer an album for them based on something of yours they'd heard. Or it could be that a television company wants you to play on an advert or TV series.

I say that they would want you, but that comes after years of bandying about, basically doing musical odd jobs, surviving on that long enough and building a reputation good enough.

An example of how tight-knit the music industry is: one of my teachers at BIMM is Kieron Pepper. He was the live drummer for The Prodigy from 1997-2007, so knows Liam Howlett pretty well. Liam Howlett knows Madonna. If Madonna was looking for a drummer in The Prodigy's kind of style, she would ask Howlett if he knew anybody, and he might recommend Kieron. That's basically how sessions work.



/thread
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#24
How good are session guitarists? Well, they're some of THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST