#1
Ah, man. Some people have it naturally to some point and some don't. I'm the latter.

So this is something I'm deeply trying to learn to do and I do ok with it sometimes, but it's very tough. Does anyone here have any advice on how to train my ear even better? I've been using an interval trainer on musictheory.net and I guess it's helping some. Is there any better way to train my ear other than just listening? I'd like to get to where I can hear something, write it down(staff or tab. I can do both, just not by ear) and play it. (Or play then write it). So any advice, guys on how to train my ear? Is it just listening over and over? Or can it be a whole lot easier?
#4
figure out songs by ear, starting with wghat jkey they are in then jam with them, then try and pick out the chord progressions like I IV V, I VI IV V etc. memorise what certainlick sound like so you can recognise them . Just lotsa practice!
#5
Interval ear training is great.

It takes time at first. After I train my ears it's actaully faster and easier for me
to learn a song by ear. Tabs are not always correct. There's so many ways to play
a riff...if you listen closely you can tell by the tone of the notes on which string.

Sometimes the fingering on tabs dosn't flow smoothly.

Tabs are helpful for very bussy parts of a song.

Theory helps a lot
#6
Just start using them, that's all you can do. Start listening to things properly and trying to work them out. It'll be damned difficult at first and take ages, there's no avoiding that, but the more you try the beter you'll get at it. Just don't go trying to work out some insanely complex solo because that won't help you at all, just start by trying to work out simple melodies or chord progressions. Don't just limit yourself to songs by bands you like either, can be anything...pop songs, tv themes, advertising jingles, ringtones etc. Don't pick things based on how much you like them, pick them solely on the basis of how simple they sound and how likely you are to be able to work them out.

Interval training and theory knowledge will help you interpret what you hear and work it out quicker, but it won't necessarily make the listening part any easier, that really only comes with practice.
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#8
yeah, it can definetly be trained. Search for intervals tutor
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#9
A good way to start is to use them to improvise. Start by humming along to a backing track (or a capella). Try to noodle things out from your head onto the guitar, rather then just playing from muscle memory. This will make you more comfortable on the guitar and make it easier to know what you will sound like before you start playing, opening up the guitar with infinite possibilities, as opposed to only being able to play things you already know.
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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Just start using them, that's all you can do. Start listening to things properly and trying to work them out. It'll be damned difficult at first and take ages, there's no avoiding that, but the more you try the beter you'll get at it. Just don't go trying to work out some insanely complex solo because that won't help you at all, just start by trying to work out simple melodies or chord progressions. Don't just limit yourself to songs by bands you like either, can be anything...pop songs, tv themes, advertising jingles, ringtones etc. Don't pick things based on how much you like them, pick them solely on the basis of how simple they sound and how likely you are to be able to work them out.

Interval training and theory knowledge will help you interpret what you hear and work it out quicker, but it won't necessarily make the listening part any easier, that really only comes with practice.



+1

me and my friend often take turns playing video games, and a lot of the time I'll sit there and figure out the music while he's playing. sometimes I'll also just have the guitar with me while I'm watching tv and try to figure out all the little commercial songs and such. it's helped a lot.
#11
Practice singing intervals, scales, etc. It helps you get the sound of the notes/intervals in your head. You have to approach developing your ear the same way you approach learning guitar. You have to be consistent and patient. Don't expect to make to make huge advances in a short amount of time. Spend time on it every day. Improvement is slow, but in the end you'll be a much better musician.