#1
Ok so I am trying to become a luthier and I thought I would either make a new neck or a new body for my Schecter.

If I made a neck it would be Maple with Maple fretboard, own style 6-in line headstock with no inlays and 24 jumbo frets. If I made a body it would be RR style 1 piece mahogany routed for 1 humbucker (Ormsby handwound) and TOM w/string through. 1 volume, 1 tone (coil split on tone control).

I am wondering what would be cheaper and easier to make (I would get a pre slotted/radiused fretboard). Also what tools would be needed to make what part. I have looked at project guitar but it wasn't very helpful.
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#3
I would say that a body will be both easier and cheaper to make.

But if you actually want to be a serious luthier then dont just go for the easy/cheap option.
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#4
It's not about whats cheaper, its about what you don't like and what you'd rather upgrade.

I do think though that luthier is quite a step up for you. Your still asking stupid/ really simple questions that anyone can work out themselves with 2 minutes and google.
Just because you make one guitar body doesn't mean your a luthier.

Being a luthier is usually much more than just electric guitar building, proper luthiers build violins, banjos, acoustic guitars, lutes etc etc not one single guitar body.
#5
Quote by random_B-RAD
Ok so I am trying to become a luthier and I thought I would either make a new neck or a new body for my Schecter.

If I made a neck it would be Maple with Maple fretboard, own style 6-in line headstock with no inlays and 24 jumbo frets. If I made a body it would be RR style 1 piece mahogany routed for 1 humbucker (Ormsby handwound) and TOM w/string through. 1 volume, 1 tone (coil split on tone control).

I am wondering what would be cheaper and easier to make (I would get a pre slotted/radiused fretboard). Also what tools would be needed to make what part. I have looked at project guitar but it wasn't very helpful.

Well, making a guitar is easy compared to some other instruments, but still hard if you have no wood working experience.

A body is relatively easy to make, especially with templates. A neck isn't impossible by any means, it just takes more time and slightly more measuring. What I do think is 'wrong' is that you want to get a pre slotted and radiussed f/b. The slotting and radiussing isn't very hard at all. Just measure carefully (you can get quite accurate slot plans for free online or even a ruler for a few bucks or alternatively you can use http://www.stewmac.com/FretCalculator). Also getting a radius is easy with something like this: http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Fretting_supplies/Leveling/Fretboard_Radius-sanding_Blocks/8_Wooden_Radius-sanding_Blocks.html.

Some people might attack you for the word 'luthier' but heck, I applaud you for not going the easy way called warmoth.com. The fact that you want to go out and make your own guitar is great! Just do sufficient reading. There are many forums dedicated to guitar building and just read up. It took me around 30-40 hours of just reading books and forums to understand how to build a guitar from 0 to 100. My first build took me roughly 100 hours or so.

The bare minimum to make a neck (a normal fender one, if you want a Gibson angled headstock you'll need some more things):
*Router for the truss rod slot and possibly the template
*Jig saw
*A 10mm (or 9mm for some) drill bit for the tuner holes
*A spokeshave
*Caliper (to make sure you neck is the same thickness all over)
*Sufficient clamps. I'd say at least 6, to glue on the f/b.
(*A saw to cut the fret slots, 5 or 6mm)
(*A radius block for the radius)
*A soft hammer
*Fret cutter (or you can use a normal one and file off the edges)
*Files
*Crowning file
(*Masking tape)
(*Steel wool)
#6
Quote by Parad

The bare minimum to make a neck (a normal fender one, if you want a Gibson angled headstock you'll need some more things):
*Router for the truss rod slot and possibly the template
*Jig saw
*A 10mm (or 9mm for some) drill bit for the tuner holes
*A spokeshave
*Caliper (to make sure you neck is the same thickness all over)
*Sufficient clamps. I'd say at least 6, to glue on the f/b.
(*A saw to cut the fret slots, 5 or 6mm)
(*A radius block for the radius)
*A soft hammer
*Fret cutter (or you can use a normal one and file off the edges)
*Files
*Crowning file
(*Masking tape)
(*Steel wool)

Necks are not the same thickness the whole way. they get thicker and thicker as they get closer to the bridge, I even have 2 fender (strat and tele) and two gibson (sg and LP) to prove this.
#7
i think he means thickness, not width
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#8
Ok, I didn't know what to make first. The body will be expencive due to pickups + bridge + body blank + all the tools and a neck will be harder but cheaper. Thanks for your opinions (even if you were an asshole).
My Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Peavey Vypyr 30
DW Collector's 3 pc drums
Mapex Black panther snare
Sabian AAX/Zildjian K cymbals.
#9
you don't have to buy new pups nor bridge nor pots. and most that i've hard that have gone through a few builds say a neck is barely harder than a body. and that you just gotta take your time. i say learn how to redo your frets on your schecter before doing a neck if you go that route. crown and polish, basically do everything that you would if you were to refret only keep the sam frets on. fretwork is time consuming and a huge part of neck building imo.

check out project guitar too. tons of tuts
#10
I think that the best advice I've ever read on here was given by SYK, and basically went along the lines of this:

Before getting into making necks and fingerboards, first perfect your setup skills. There's no point in making a neck if you can't radius a fingerboard, level and crown frets, adjust neck relief, slut a nut, and intonate correctly. The most important part is getting something playable in the end.

Believe me, I wish that I'd not rushed into a build without nailing those things first.
#11
Quote by guitarcam123
It's not about whats cheaper, its about what you don't like and what you'd rather upgrade.

I do think though that luthier is quite a step up for you. Your still asking stupid/ really simple questions that anyone can work out themselves with 2 minutes and google.
Just because you make one guitar body doesn't mean your a luthier.

Being a luthier is usually much more than just electric guitar building, proper luthiers build violins, banjos, acoustic guitars, lutes etc etc not one single guitar body.


The term luthier stems from people that made lutes - hence the name. It's basically making any type of stringed instrument nowadays but I also believe that people that build electric guitars aren't "true" luthiers in the sense that they don't have to steam bend sides and do all of the things associated with keeping an acoustic type instrument in one piece.

but yea... neck making is simple... you guys are too uptight about it
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#12
^+1

Making the neck is pretty easy and one of the more enjoyable parts of building. I suggest getting a preradiused and slotted fretboard for your 1st couple necks simply because it's cheaper to do it that way than it is to buy the tools to radius and slot a fretboard. If you want one of the high end stewmac fretting and radius setups you have to make about 30 fretboards before the tools pay for themselves. You don't, however, need any special tools to carve the rest of the neck. That just takes a chisel, scraper, and a couple clamps all of which you would need for the rest of the building process anyway.
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#13
Quote by guitarcam123
Necks are not the same thickness the whole way. they get thicker and thicker as they get closer to the bridge, I even have 2 fender (strat and tele) and two gibson (sg and LP) to prove this.

You're right, I wasn't completely accurate. The width obviously increases (nut being smaller than at the bridge) and the thickness of the neck also differs, which can be shaped to taste.
#14
Quote by -MintSauce-
I think that the best advice I've ever read on here was given by SYK, and basically went along the lines of this:

Before getting into making necks and fingerboards, first perfect your setup skills. There's no point in making a neck if you can't radius a fingerboard, level and crown frets, adjust neck relief, slut a nut, and intonate correctly. The most important part is getting something playable in the end.

Believe me, I wish that I'd not rushed into a build without nailing those things first.

Partially I agree. But you can learn to crown, level, make a nut (you can buy a ready made Graphtech though..) after you've built the neck. Or practice on your neck. Or take it to a shop and ask if you can watch as he does the fretting etc.

In fact, building a guitar has given me more sense of how a guitar works, and thus what is important to make a guitar playable. Most techs just do a trick they know works, without understanding what it does thoroughly.

But I sort of presume anyone who considers building a guitar, knows how to deal with basic things like replacing a nut and doing the intonation (mainly since it takes 5 minutes to learn).