#1
Hi, in my band, I (lead guitarist), bassist, and rhtynm guitarist sing backing vocals and we have a singer doing lead. But how do we get our vocals to sound really powerful, like on the track touch too much or like the rest of the Highway to Hell album. I know obviously AC/DC had Mutt Lange and he was great with vocals, but can someone gives us tips on how to sound like that.
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#2
ive been trying to get the same thing and having asked my vocal instructor, it seems that adding a touch of reverb + delay to vocals is pretty standard and makes them sound good without sounding 'unnnatural'
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#3
Double (or more) tracking, reverb (if you can 'hear' the reverb, it's too much), etc. Remember when recording - you don't have to sing your lungs out into the mic. Sing a good and strong sound, and you can up the volume in the mix.
#4
I don't know how AC/DC does it, but try to find a good harmony and make sure you are all matching each other and in pitch. one of you could sing lower than the lead while someone else sings higher than the lead, whatever. think of it like building a chord with your voices, someone matching an octave down, someone matching a 5th up, etc. just try singing at different pitches and see what sounds good.
#5
First of all, you'll want to listen to each other sing one at a time and listen for things like small, inappropriate variances in dynamics. This is usually caused by inexperience with singing into a mic. You also have to make sure you maintain the same distance from the mic or it'll sound like your vocals are going in and out. Next, you'll want to sing together without the instruments to make sure your vocals are in tune and that they follow the same rhythm (assuming they are supposed to follow the same rhythm).

After you've looked at all this, then it's time to add the fancy stuff like delay and reverb. Use a small amount of delay to fatten up the vocals a little, then layer your reverbs. Use a very small amount of reverb for this first layer, then maybe a medium (should be a delay closer to the smaller reverb) and a longer reverb. Most of all, make sure your voices don't clash in the mix or it'll sound crowded and muddy.

Also, if you're having trouble keeping an even volume, try using a SMALL bit of compression, maybe something like 2:1 or 3:1.
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Last edited by Zilcho at Sep 11, 2009,
#6
Record the vocals in the bathroom.

Also a lot of it obviously depends on how good the singer is in the first place.
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#7
Quote by hardrockerdave9
Hi, in my band, I (lead guitarist), bassist, and rhtynm guitarist sing backing vocals and we have a singer doing lead. But how do we get our vocals to sound really powerful, like on the track touch too much or like the rest of the Highway to Hell album. I know obviously AC/DC had Mutt Lange and he was great with vocals, but can someone gives us tips on how to sound like that.


talent + Experience + expensive gear


just do the best you can. You're not going to make a recording as good as AC/DC... just accept that for now and learn from the experience.
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