#1
"The Bass has 14 dB of gain centered at 120 Hz; the Midrange has 15 dB of gain centered around 300 Hz; and the Treble has 10dB of gain centered around 1.2 kHz. Distortion has 10 dB of Gain while the output volume has a full 18dB of gain. All controls were designed to interact together for maximum cutting edge and a uniquely powerful distortion."
#3
^ or, those of us who have taken the classes can share the knowledge!

dB is short for decibel, which is a unit of measurement for volume. Hz is Hertz and kHz is Kilohertz (obv) which measure wavelength, and wavelength determines pitch. Gain is basically volume.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#4
Quote by Ultragoose
Man, some of us are spending 30,000 quid at uni to learn this...

You know , you need to read a decent book that explains it all.



lol, fine, some suggestion?
#5
A dB is a decibel, which is basically a measurement of how loud something is. A dB level of 10 means that the power ratio factor has been changed by a factor of 10.

The Hz and kHz are frequency measurements. The lower the frequency, the bassier a sound is. 1.2 kHz is the equivalent to 1200 Hz.

Essentially, all this information is telling you is how much of a power factor change the various knobs are capable of, and at what frequency levels your bass, mids, and treble are being boosted.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#7
Dude above me is correct, but more specifically,

When you turn the bass knob up, you're going to increase the level of the sound at 120 Hz. To get an idea of where this frequency is in the spectrum of sounds, google a close up picture of a graphic equalizer. The spectrum of audible sound is about 5 Hz to 50,000 Hz (or 50 kHz) if I recall correctly. 1 dB of gain is roughly equivalent to the amount of difference in volume that can be heard by the naked ear. 14 dB is 14 times that. Same goes for the midrange and treble. The gain in the distortion and output volume mean the device can amplify the sound that is put into it by the amounts indicated.
#8
Quote by tasanhalas
"The Bass has 14 dB of gain centered at 120 Hz; the Midrange has 15 dB of gain centered around 300 Hz; and the Treble has 10dB of gain centered around 1.2 kHz. Distortion has 10 dB of Gain while the output volume has a full 18dB of gain. All controls were designed to interact together for maximum cutting edge and a uniquely powerful distortion."



I think you got an idea about the terms by the above posts.

dB - volume
Hz - pitch
(kHz)=1000XHz

"The Bass has 14 dB of gain centered at 120 Hz"

Here, centered at 120Hz means, it's aimed at the pitch 120Hz. So, the bass knob controls the volume of the sound around this certain pitch.
All together this means the Bass knob can increase the volume of the pitch 120 Hz(and the around pitches) from 0-14 of a certain scale.

EDIT- The previous post has explained it already. Didn't see that.
Last edited by YA89 at Sep 10, 2009,
#10
Quote by Xeron Brigs
A dB is a decibel, which is basically a measurement of how loud something is. A dB level of 10 means that the power ratio factor has been changed by a factor of 10.

The Hz and kHz are frequency measurements. The lower the frequency, the bassier a sound is. 1.2 kHz is the equivalent to 1200 Hz.

Essentially, all this information is telling you is how much of a power factor change the various knobs are capable of, and at what frequency levels your bass, mids, and treble are being boosted.

Close.

Decibels actually refers to a simplified measure of sound intensity. It is usually formulated from the equation 10*log 10 (sound intensity/10^-12). This is done because raw sound intensity values will range from incredibly small to incredibly large and will sound subjectively louder by a logarithm scale. Sound intensity is defined by power (in watts) by meters square (W/M^2), and power is measured by energy (in joules) over time, or E/t. Sometimes you'll see E (energy) represented by W (as work).

As you can see, ultimately decibels is a measure of energy, time and distance.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#11
Quote by Ultragoose
Man, some of us are spending 30,000 quid at uni to learn this...

You know , you need to read a decent book that explains it all.

You paid 30k to learn simple Physics terms?
Call me Batman.
#12
yer as said above the dB scale is a log scale - that means twice as many dB is 10 times more sound intensity

saying 14dB centered at 120Hz means it increases the volume "up to" 14dB more0 (from whatever baseline it produces) of the 120Hz frequency.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more