#1
Whenever I play an open G chord, it always sounds bad or at least not as good as others (ie open C, D etc). I know that it is not that my guitar is not in tune, that's a stupid excuse. It happens on all guitars I've played (not saying that I've played a lot but if I play a friends guitar it always sounds weird).
#2
Haha yeah... I noticed that too. Once the guitar is properly tuned, it's only very slightly though. =P
Playing g chords always helps me tune =D
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#3
Because if one chord is in tune, all other chords will be slightly out of tune unless you have this:
http://www.truetemperament.com/site/index.php

Imperfect intonation is just the nature of fretted instruments.
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#4
^ most people can't tell the difference. i'd also like to point out that if the strings are kinda flimsy on a guitar (as i notice they often are on guitars) that can screw with the tone of everything.
#5
If you're pressing hard, it will probably make them sound out of tune. You're probably pressing too hard on the high e string, making it go sharp. Your D's don't sound out of tune because you're probably making all the strings you're pressing go sharp so it still sounds right. The other chords don't really use the lighter strings anyways, so they're probably in tune. Make sure you're not fretting too hard, and make sure your guitar really IS in tune. I've tuned my guitar before, thinking it was perfect, only to hit that sour note and realize one of my strings is almost a quarter-tone off.
#6
well if your guitar is in fact in tune, the intonation might be out. even if that was fine, it will never be perfect because of how the frets are. i find fretting the e and B string on the 3rd fret instead of just the e sounds more in tune and sounds fuller. try it if you dont already.
#7
This has been happening to me, except in a different sense, I've been slowly noticing, that alot of consonant chords sound dissonant to me, like if I play a root position C on piano, it just sounds bad, but other chords and intervals that're considered dissonant sound way better to me, IE, major 2nd, tritones. Stuff like that... In fact, to my ears a Edim sounds more consonant then an E major....

Troubling indeed...
#8
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
well if your guitar is in fact in tune, the intonation might be out. even if that was fine, it will never be perfect because of how the frets are. i find fretting the e and B string on the 3rd fret instead of just the e sounds more in tune and sounds fuller. try it if you dont already.

+1

i was going to say this too, alot of things can mess with a guitars intonation
#9
The b string also tends to be a little flat, even to your ear when you are tuning. Eddie Van Halen always tuned it a little higher to compensate. E chords just have that chunky bottom so you tend to disregard it, but as the third in a G chord it can really stick out.
#10
Because if one chord is in tune, all other chords will be slightly out of tune unless you have this:
http://www.truetemperament.com/site/index.php

Imperfect intonation is just the nature of fretted instruments.

wow. never even thought about it that way. thats almost taking it too far lol

and ya the b string on the 3rd fret makes it sound better to me to, so ive always fretted it like that
#11
Yeah I think they are. That's just the nature of fretted instruments. Most people don't notice though, so if you're worried about your audience, I wouldn't be.
#12
I never agree 100% with my tuner....I don't give a **** what the cool little lights say, I trust my ear more.

With the open G chord - I always play it fretting the D on the B string as well. It helps.
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#13
Strum it really slow and find your out of tune strings. I let the tuner do most of the work and do the rest by ear.
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#14
Like people have said, it will never be truly, 100% in tune, but unless you've got freakishly sensitive ears, it definately shouldn't "always sound bad". Try listening to a few songs which make use of this chord, does it sound bad in those recordings? I'd be surprised if you said yes, and assuming it does sound ok to you, the only remaining possibilties are that you're fretting it badly, the guitar(s) have bad intonation, or that they are indeed a little out of tune...
#15
heres what i do: i tune the e then the a, d and g normally. When I get to the b string I tune it with the 4th string D and 2nd string 3rd fret and the high e 3rd fret with the open 3rd string; (also known as "an octave higher"). After that I sound a 2 note power chord beginning at the low e and work myself up using open chords. When I get to the the D chord, I use root, 5th and octave. If these waver some, I tune the b string either up or down. then I tune the high e with a open g, 2nd string third fret d and 1st string 3rd fret g. If these waver I tune the high e string. Most times this works for me. I have found though that sometimes a power chord played higher on the neck will sound funny. Why? Because the intonation is out of whack. This may not work for some but may for others.
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#16
I not to fond to the common open G chord. I like using a different voicing.

E[3]
B[3]
G[0]
D[0]
A[2]
E[3]

Try that.
#17
Im surprised no ones giving what I would think to be the best answer for this question. The major 3rd in a chord will always sound a little flat, and the minor 3rd will sound sharp (correct me if I have this backwards). On some instruments (ex: brass,woodwind) the players playing the thirds can adjust the pitch with their face to sound more intune.

Halfway through typing this post I kindof digested the fact that you specified "Open G chord' in which case if your not hearing it as much with barre chords, then it probably has more to do with the fact that most guitars are not made perfect and cannot have "perfect" intonation. But on an open G the 3rd (B) is going to ring pretty clearly so that may still have an effect.
#18
Quote by USAPeavey
Because if one chord is in tune, all other chords will be slightly out of tune unless you have this:
http://www.truetemperament.com/site/index.php

Imperfect intonation is just the nature of fretted instruments.


Lol, I had a three day argument with archeo avis once because he wouldnt believe that intonation will never be perfect on a fixed pitch instrument

EDIT ^Yea dude, you got it backwards. Major 3rds have to be flattened and minor thirds have to be sharpened. Perfect fifths also have to be widened by about 2 cents
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Sep 12, 2009,
#19
Quote by tubatom868686
Lol, I had a three day argument with archeo avis once because he wouldnt believe that intonation will never be perfect on a fixed pitch instrument

EDIT ^Yea dude, you got it backwards. Major 3rds have to be flattened and minor thirds have to be sharpened. Perfect fifths also have to be widened by about 2 cents

Yeah I said major thirds will sound sharp, thus they need to be flattened and vice versa. And I didnt know that about perfect fifths, thanks for the tid bit.
#20
Quote by SKAtastic7770
Yeah I said major thirds will sound sharp, thus they need to be flattened and vice versa. And I didnt know that about perfect fifths, thanks for the tid bit.



Awe my bad. I thought you said you have to make major thirds sharp etc etc.