#1
Is it a good idea to record several guitar layers with different distortions ?
Last edited by MikeDee at Sep 10, 2009,
#3
Rammstein have 7 layers on their later albums; different tunings, distortions, neck positions etc. Leads to a "huge" sound.
#5
yeah, Listen to "Drain You" by Nirvana. It starts out with one guitar track and a couple others come in layered right over it not far into the song. I don't think to achieve a good sound that all/most layers should have too much gain or it might just sound like a big pile of brown goo. I could be wrong, however, for I've never experimented with such techniques.
#7
Quote by -tempest-
i just learned something here =]. thanks everyone


and also another technique is to, copy and paste the same guitar track but EQ differently, even that helps to achieve the "bigger" sound feel
#8
mmh thanks everyone for the helpful responses, while we're on topic, those layers should have different volumes and be EQ'd right?
#11
Quote by MikeDee
Is it a good idea to record several guitar layers with different distortions ?


Yeah, but it depends how many layers you have. If you had four tracks of guitar, I would have the same sound on each two tracks and then pan the first two left and right and the second two half way left and right like 50%.
#12
Are we talking wall or WAAAAALLLLL here?

I'm sure several layers would sound ****in amazing on a drone song. But generally you can get a tight as **** heavy sound by double tracking. Your going to be adding bass and drums later, this will definately make things sound bigger.
#13
yeah, Smashing Pumpkins used that a lot. 30+ guitars layered over each other if I remember.
Quote by icaneatcatfood
On second thought, **** tuning forks. You best be carrying around a grand piano that was tuned by an Italian
#14
Quote by seanington
Are we talking wall or WAAAAALLLLL here?

I'm sure several layers would sound ****in amazing on a drone song. But generally you can get a tight as **** heavy sound by double tracking. Your going to be adding bass and drums later, this will definately make things sound bigger.


that would depend on what the person wants to achieve sound wise, if he record 5 tracks and it sounds to much, its very simple to click delete, but generally after the double taking you start to hear the big difference and its decision time to do another or work on the other instruments
#15
mmh and what about mixing clean parts with parts with distortion ? I heard Green Day did that a lot for American Idiot.
#16
Quote by MikeDee
mmh and what about mixing clean parts with parts with distortion ? I heard Green Day did that a lot for American Idiot.


Classic trick. Same goes for doubling a part on acoustic and having it in the background. Appears on a lot of classic rock albums. Experiment with all these techniques so you can figure out what works for you. I tend to use 4 tracks maximum (if we're talking the same part here) where two are humbucker electrics with various overdrive/distorsion, one acoustic (with almost all the bass cut out), and then a semi-clean single coil electric. But it all depends on the song and genre.
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