#1
I apologize if the answer here is obvious, but I'm a rookie when it comes to recording equipment or really recording in-general, so most of this stuff is alien to me.

Anyway, after advice from here(Much thanks to Kyle62 and Sandyman323 for the advice given), I'm looking into a condenser mic for recording, currently the Nady SCM900 since I'm poor and can't afford to spend too much.

Every review though has the person either using acoustic instruments or vocals. In addition to vocals I intend to use this with an electric guitar since I write a fair bit for the electric guitar in addition to the acoustic and vocals, and I like to set up to record similar to Eric Clapton pre-Cream and during the early days with Cream; loud, distorted and powerful. So I feel I may need something less sensitive, as stupid as that sounds, to avoid overpowering and clipping the mic.

So simply, being as people say condenser mics are both sensitive and fragile, I was wondering if I should get a dynamic mic instead or split my funds and get one of each(I'd prefer not to do this to avoid compromising the quality of either, but if it'll get me a better sound overall then I suppose I'll go with it if I can afford to)?
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#2
If your going to mic a guitar amp, def. go with a dynamic mic. There are some condensors that i supposed you could use to mic an amp, but i wouln't suggest it. Condensors have low SPL's (sound pressure levels) and are a little more high maintance being that there susceptable to damage from prolonged exposure to humidity, etc. Dynamic mics handle much greater SPL's and some are practically indestructible (cough*sm57*cough). That mic, btw, everyone will suggest being that you can't really go wrong. What's your budget?
#3
Quote by wat???
If your going to mic a guitar amp, def. go with a dynamic mic. There are some condensors that i supposed you could use to mic an amp, but i wouln't suggest it. Condensors have low SPL's (sound pressure levels) and are a little more high maintance being that there susceptable to damage from prolonged exposure to humidity, etc. Dynamic mics handle much greater SPL's and some are practically indestructible (cough*sm57*cough). That mic, btw, everyone will suggest being that you can't really go wrong.


Alright then, I suppose I'll start looking into a dynamic mic. Should I get it in addition to the condenser, or just the dynamic?

What's your budget?


Total preferably no more than $75, though depending on the quality I can splurge to $100. Also keep in mind that the price of everything is 20% less than usual, as I work for a store owned by Guitar Center, and as such get an employee discount there.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#4
a mic's a mic. they aren't picky about the source of the sound. granted, some are more sensitive and delicate and some are made to be better at some things than others, but they all pick up sound from any source that will present it to them. condensers will work fine on amps. a lot of people use them actually... you could even take a look at all these amp modeling software that's out. well at least Guitar Rig and Logic give you the option of a dynamic or condenser on your amp as they sound different. that Nady that you're looking at has a 125 dB SPL handling. that's more than plenty. unless somehow you're getting massively crazy levels coming out of that amp of yours.

of course, that is a $60 condenser, so it will be nothing at all amazing, but seeing as how you're a rookie with this stuff, there's no reason not to get started with something affordable and upgrade as your ears (and wallet) improve.

if you could afford both (look used, but be very very careful about these online) having that condenser AND am sm57 would be lovely. you really wouldn't use the 57 for much other than your amp, so if you can only get one i'd suggest get the condenser.
#5
Alright, the easy choice is an SM57 ($100) for intrument mic'ing, though i strongly suggest research. There maybe mics with more clarity or with the sound your looking for around the same price, but idk how rugged they are. SM57 has a bullet proof casing i believe and can even be dropped in water and live, though you should never test it. (They did it on youtube for you already...search it). You can record vocals with it to, but they'll sound flat. I have 2 condensors that i use for drums and vocals (mxl 2 pack for $100). Dynamic can work for recording acoustic and vocals, but it won't come out nearly as good. I'm not sure what you intend to record more, electric or vocals and acoustic.
Definitely get other people's opinions and thoughts on this. There are people way more suited to these kinds of questions than i am.
And don't forget, after the mic, you still need cables and an interface/(good) sound card to connect the mic to your computer (unless your using something like portastudio).
#6
Quote by sandyman323
a mic's a mic. they aren't picky about the source of the sound. granted, some are more sensitive and delicate and some are made to be better at some things than others, but they all pick up sound from any source that will present it to them. condensers will work fine on amps. a lot of people use them actually... you could even take a look at all these amp modeling software that's out. well at least Guitar Rig and Logic give you the option of a dynamic or condenser on your amp as they sound different. that Nady that you're looking at has a 125 dB SPL handling. that's more than plenty. unless somehow you're getting massively crazy levels coming out of that amp of yours.


Hmm...well then, I suppose I'll get the condenser and, if it doesn't work, start recording the acoustic stuff I've written up and save for a dynamic. And it's a 15W tube amp that barely ever leaves 4 on the preamp and 4 on the power amp but still manages to sound good somehow, it's not as loud as I like usually(Though there are a few studio-style soundproof rooms at the shop I work in for lessons, I may be able to borrow one to push it a bit louder in when recording on my days off).

of course, that is a $60 condenser, so it will be nothing at all amazing, but seeing as how you're a rookie with this stuff, there's no reason not to get started with something affordable and upgrade as your ears (and wallet) improve.


Believe me, if I could afford it I'd be going with Shure(Who I've already had great experiences with via my PG48 I use live with my band) and already have an SM57. But yeah, I'm just looking for something that'll actually sound good enough I'm not embarrassed to record tracks and let others listen, while not being strictly a beginners mic.

if you could afford both (look used, but be very very careful about these online) having that condenser AND am sm57 would be lovely. you really wouldn't use the 57 for much other than your amp, so if you can only get one i'd suggest get the condenser.


Hmm...Well, I do suppose I could always take a look around eBay and the used section at GC and see what pops up.

Quote by wat???
Alright, the easy choice is an SM57 ($100) for intrument mic'ing, though i strongly suggest research. There maybe mics with more clarity or with the sound your looking for around the same price, but idk how rugged they are. SM57 has a bullet proof casing i believe and can even be dropped in water and live, though you should never test it. (They did it on youtube for you already...search it).


Hmm...will look into what I can find then.

You can record vocals with it to, but they'll sound flat. I have 2 condensors that i use for drums and vocals (mxl 2 pack for $100). Dynamic can work for recording acoustic and vocals, but it won't come out nearly as good. I'm not sure what you intend to record more, electric or vocals and acoustic.


Probably vocals are what are going to get the least use, and I've written mainly for my electric, but lately I find I've been writing more and more acoustic, likely attributable to that I've lately really been getting back into The Beatles and Bob Dylan.

Definitely get other people's opinions and thoughts on this. There are people way more suited to these kinds of questions than i am.
And don't forget, after the mic, you still need cables and an interface/(good) sound card to connect the mic to your computer (unless your using something like portastudio).


Will-do. As for cables, if I have one XLR cable(Which I can get for about $15 from Livewire) I'm willing to connect and disconnect when switching instruments. As for the interface, I have an M-Audio Fastrack, not the best, but for starting out home recording it's something, and a huge step from what I use right now(USB Rock Band mic -> USB port).
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
Last edited by necrosis1193 at Sep 11, 2009,
#7
Quote by wat???
There maybe mics with more clarity or with the sound your looking for around the same price, but idk how rugged they are. SM57 has a bullet proof casing i believe and can even be dropped in water and live, though you should never test it. (They did it on youtube for you already...search it).


your absolutely right about that. toughest mic out there, and sounds good too. works wonders for live sound. the thing is though, in the studio, durability is not your top concern. studio equipment is (or should be) taken very good care of.

not to say it's not worth getting. it most definitely is, but if he's only getting one mic, a condenser (in his situation) will be more versatile and probably a better investment. i'd put the 57 at the number 2 spot on the wish list.

but Wat??? is also right about the research. and getting more opinions besides ours. we both could be completely wrong... ...you never know...

...but i do think we're right here
#8
Quote by sandyman323
your absolutely right about that. toughest mic out there, and sounds good too. works wonders for live sound. the thing is though, in the studio, durability is not your top concern. studio equipment is (or should be) taken very good care of.

not to say it's not worth getting. it most definitely is, but if he's only getting one mic, a condenser (in his situation) will be more versatile and probably a better investment. i'd put the 57 at the number 2 spot on the wish list.


Aye, I actually intend to get one sometime soon to replace my PG48 as my live vocal mic(In addition to guitar I sing in my band), but I'm just looking for something for "studio" recordings(If you can call my basement a studio), so durability isn't a concern.

but Wat??? is also right about the research. and getting more opinions besides ours. we both could be completely wrong... ...you never know...


I suppose I'll ask the singers and the one indie producer at the shop I work in then when I go to work on Saturday.

...but i do think we're right here


XD As do I, otherwise I wouldn't ask here.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#9
awesome, best of luck to you man. we're always open to answer any other questions that pop up.
#10
Quote by sandyman323
awesome, best of luck to you man. we're always open to answer any other questions that pop up.


Thanks, if I have any more once I get the mic I'll be sure to ask, you've no idea how helpful this particular section of UG's been to me with just two threads in it, especially you since you were the only one to post in all two of my threads here.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#11
You should get some very usable guitar sounds out of a condenser. Have a listen to the sound clips in my profile, all done with my USB condenser. They're a little more forgiving with positioning, though generally need to be further from the amp than a dynamic to avoid overloading the capsule.

Unfortunately my house has very dodgy old electrical wiring so the amp was making far too much noise to get really good tones, beyond a bluesy crunch.


Also, any good dynamic vocal mic will work perfectly well for guitar mic'ing - I use SM58s and Sennheisers all the time and get great results. Whatever vocal mic you chosse to replace your PG48, I guarantee you'll be able to get great guitar tones out of it.
Last edited by kyle62 at Sep 11, 2009,