#1
I've looked around about midi and have learned a bit, but theres still a few questions I'd apprectiate if you guys could help me out. (Sorry if this is the wrong place, but I'm using this for recording so it seemed appropriate to me).
I have a tascam US-144 interface that has midi inputs/outputs. I also have an old Korg synth/keyboard. I know i connect the synth midi out to the interface midi in and vice versa, but I'm a little confused as to why. I get that the digital info gets sent from the synth to the interface, but why does it have to go back to the synth? I'm going to assume the info first goes into the computer through some kind of software to give sound to the digital info, but why back to the synth from there? Maybe the sound is going back to the synth to recieve a sound for the digital commands? but then what would be the purpose of the whole midi, why not just use an audio output and make it easy.
As you can tell I'm confused, please help me.
#2
Midi is the way instruments talk to each other

to have midi out from the computer to the synth, would mean with the right software you can adjust the settings of the synth via your computer

Edit: also with fruity loops u can create something on the computer and have it played through your keyboard/synth
Last edited by Martindecorum at Sep 11, 2009,
#3
The point of MIDI was that back in the 70s-80s, the trend was to have loads of keyboards (because each has it's individual sound). Now the problem was that you had to run from keyboard to keyboard when you switched sounds - not fun. So some had the idea that you could use just one or two keyboards, and have the rest backstage, maybe in rack form. Thus MIDI was born, as a way to get keyboards from different manufacturers to talk to each others.

Now there are many other uses, such as using drum pads to control synths (seriously cool), adding knobs for more control, or sending presets to/from a PC. Also what's great IMO is it keeps your keyboard independant of your synths if you so wish - For example, I upgraded a while back from an Oxygen 49 to a much better PCR-500, giving me much better key action without having to even touch my synth.

In your setup, say if you upgraded to a new keyboard, you might want to take both keyboards out gigging, so you can have different sounds on different keyboards. However, what if one of your old songs was entirely made on the Korg? Easy: Hook the new keyboard up to the Korg with MIDI cables, and for that song you can set the new keyboard to control the Korg instead of making sounds itself, thus you have two keyboards controling the one synth.

Also you can record MIDI instead of audio, so if you're a crap player you can tweak the notes easily afterwards and then record the perfectly-played audio.

Finally MIDI has many uses within a PC controling software synths.
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.
#4
www.native-instruments.com has soem good software like Kore, but it costs, so they have a free version named Kore Player. Kore Player is just a library of sounds that you can expand with soundpacks.

I recommend you to try out Kore Player.

To use it
1. Connect the MIDI out on your keyboard to the interface
2. On your DAW, make a track
3. Set the input of the track to MIDI, all channels
4. Assign Kore Player as an effect, select the VSTi version (the VST version has some problem when redering, but it's fine for jamming and playback)
5. Choose your sound
6. Enjoy and have fun
#5
Quote by wat???
I get that the digital info gets sent from the synth to the interface, but why does it have to go back to the synth? I'm going to assume the info first goes into the computer through some kind of software to give sound to the digital info, but why back to the synth from there? Maybe the sound is going back to the synth to recieve a sound for the digital commands? but then what would be the purpose of the whole midi, why not just use an audio output and make it easy.


This is where you go wrong. MIDI is not audio, it does not contain any sound what so ever. What it is is a set of instructions to or from a synth/keyboard/sequencer. MIDI (which, incidentally, stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface) are just numbers that mean a certain thing when interpreted.

So, the MIDI out on the interface is so that you computer (or more specifically, your sequencer) can communicate to the keyboard while the MIDI in is so that what you play on the keyboard can be interpreted, and recorded, by the sequencer. There is no sound transferred via MIDI.

The reason for not just using an audio output and recording it is that MIDI is very editable. Hit a wrong note? If you recorded the MIDI data you can just change that note's pitch and timing. With audio you'd either have to edit the audio file or re-record part of the track. Plus, with MIDI, since it's just controller data, you can easily change the sound of the recording by changing what plays back the data.
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#6
I know midi isn't audio, thats why i said i know its digital information and that i understand the info is sent to the computer (sequencer) to recieve a sound for the given info. I get that. I don't get why it has to be sent from the interface back to the computer.
#7
It doesn't have to. If you just want the PC controlling the synth, only hook up the PC Out to the synth In. If you just want to record some MIDI notes or play a softsynth then just hook up the synth Out to the PC In. In fact, unless you've explicitly told your software to send the MIDI back out to the synth, it isn't doing it.
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.