#1
well trying hard but not getting the speed needed/ anticipated.....

Trying to a learn pentatonic lick for 4 months and i still can not play it, can not have the control over the finger while playing on 120 tempo(per beat 4 note)... sometime i can play it but sometime i just can not complete the lick and my finger get stuck in the string....

__________________________________________________ ____
The lick is on Am pentatonic

E 8-5
B ---8-5----8-5
G -------7-5----7-5-----7 5
D ------------------7-5-----7-5-----7-5
A ------------------------------7 5-----7-5
E ----------------------------------------- 8 5
__________________________________________________ ____


my friends are saying this is becoz of

1. I haven't played acoustic guitar for long time(like 2 years). They say playing acoustic strengthen fingers and then building speed becomes easy, and then ppl get real control over electric guitar. they say that i should have played my early fingering lesson on acoustic.(well i did on those early days for 4 months)

2. Some say about my picking. I hold pick straight(180 degree...u can say) against string. They say this actually reduces my speed and also control.( well i like it. Picking like this gives clarity to tone....i think. Also helpful when u skip string.)

well..Im playing guitar for 3 years. Seriously for 1.5 years. And practicing this lick continuously 20 min, 3 days in a week for long 4 months(also with a variation in tempo, using metronome). I think this lick is not that much hard and i should be able to play this by now. But im failed.

Well i can play some tracks like Only for the weak, Colony, Trigger, The jester race, Cloud connected with no problem(mostly in flames). I mean i can play almost every kind of riff with no problem.

Well long thread. Im quite frustrated. If u have any suggestion, recommendation, query. feels like a looser who can not play a pentatonic lick after having a good practice...lolz.

Thanks......
#2
well, go slower than what you're going now. that should help you get it down. then once you get it, do pull offs after you pick the first note for each string; it will also help you gain speed and get a more fluid sound. then try it alt. picking.

make sure you have proper fingering technique too.
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#4
Quote by The4thHorsemen
does the problem seem to be coming from your picking or your fingers?



Actually both..not consistent while picking..........
#5
seeing as we can't see your hands it's pretty difficult to comment on whether/how your technique is stopping you play. any chance of some pics?
a guitar teacher would be able to sort you out quite quickly on this.
#6
Simple solution.

Get better at playing it slower first. You can't play something at "x" speed until you've first mastered it at all the speeds slower than that. So, go all the way down to the speed at which you can play it perfectly and look to improve from there. If you just keep "trying" to play it faster you'll just keep failing because all you're doing is practicing your mistakes.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
^ What this smart man said.

Actually I'm practicing something that looks like that lick in reverse (except in E) - working on Technical Difficulties right now, and it's the opening lick of the solo. That version is sextuplets at 120 bpm, so I'm going to be working on it for a while.

To add to what Steven/Mark said - suppose you can play it at 100 bpm (just a random number for the sake of discussion ) and if you go any higher your fingers freeze. Well, what you'll notice is that well under that speed, say 80 bpm, you'll be able to detect a little "glitch" at some point in the lick. Like a bit where you have to think a bit harder, or a moment of uncertainty, or awkwardness or whatever. But it will be subtle. The lick will still sound fine at this point. But that is what is stopping you from playing the lick faster - the little glitch becomes a giant lick killing, finger confusing, major problem when you up the tempo.
So, what you do is only practice the lick up until the point where you can play it while the glitch is still subtle. Practice up that speed every day until you can no longer notice the glitch, and only then, up the tempo a little bit. If you start noticing the little glitch at this new tempo, keep practicing til it is gone, if not keep upping the tempo in small increments (maybe 2 bpm) every few days. And so on. You can also supplement this by isolating on the couple of beats where the glitch appears to get it out faster.
Last edited by se012101 at Sep 12, 2009,
#8
Quote by se012101
^ What this smart man said.

Actually I'm practicing something that looks like that lick in reverse (except in E) - working on Technical Difficulties right now, and it's the opening lick of the solo. That version is sextuplets at 120 bpm, so I'm going to be working on it for a while.

To add to what Steven/Mark said - suppose you can play it at 100 bpm (just a random number for the sake of discussion ) and if you go any higher your fingers freeze. Well, what you'll notice is that well under that speed, say 80 bpm, you'll be able to detect a little "glitch" at some point in the lick. Like a bit where you have to think a bit harder, or a moment of uncertainty, or awkwardness or whatever. But it will be subtle. The lick will still sound fine at this point. But that is what is stopping you from playing the lick faster - the little glitch becomes a giant lick killing, finger confusing, major problem when you up the tempo.
So, what you do is only practice the lick up until the point where you can play it while the glitch is still subtle. Practice up that speed every day until you can no longer notice the glitch, and only then, up the tempo a little bit. If you start noticing the little glitch at this new tempo, keep practicing til it is gone, if not keep upping the tempo in small increments (maybe 2 bpm) every few days. And so on. You can also supplement this by isolating on the couple of beats where the glitch appears to get it out faster.


OK..thank u a lot and all for replying.

I can play this lick at 105 tempo easily. but higher tempo i get problem. But after playing this lick about 10 to 15 min i can play even with 130 tempo. Thats what i was saying im not consistent and also my speed is not increasing as i could play with 105 tempo 4 months ago. And for last 4 months im practicing this lick 20 min thrice a week
as i said but could not increased my speed.
#9
If you can play it consistently at 105 bpm then stop trying to play it at 130, you should be concentrating on getting it consistent at 106, then 107, then 108 etc. That's not going to happen in 15 minutes, and if you keep trying to play it faster you'll never get any better.

However the best thing you can do stop worrying about it and learn other stuff, it's only one lick - knowing it won't make you any "better" at guitar really, it just means you can play one more lick. Just forget about it completely and go away and work on other stuff. Come back to it after 3 months and you'll probably be able to do it without thinking. In the greater scheme of things whether or not you can play a single lick 30pm faster means nothing - speed is the least important thing when it comes to judging how "good" a guitarist is, but because it's something you can attach a number to people obsess over it for no good reason. Guitar isn't about measuring things, it's not a sport...there's no empirical scale to enable you to quantify what makes somebody "better", it's just music...it's art.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
If you can play it consistently at 105 bpm then stop trying to play it at 130, you should be concentrating on getting it consistent at 106, then 107, then 108 etc. That's not going to happen in 15 minutes, and if you keep trying to play it faster you'll never get any better.

However the best thing you can do stop worrying about it and learn other stuff, it's only one lick - knowing it won't make you any "better" at guitar really, it just means you can play one more lick. Just forget about it completely and go away and work on other stuff. Come back to it after 3 months and you'll probably be able to do it without thinking. In the greater scheme of things whether or not you can play a single lick 30pm faster means nothing - speed is the least important thing when it comes to judging how "good" a guitarist is, but because it's something you can attach a number to people obsess over it for no good reason. Guitar isn't about measuring things, it's not a sport...there's no empirical scale to enable you to quantify what makes somebody "better", it's just music...it's art.



Well thanks.........
#11
Quote by steven seagull
In the greater scheme of things whether or not you can play a single lick 30pm faster means nothing - speed is the least important thing when it comes to judging how "good" a guitarist is, but because it's something you can attach a number to people obsess over it for no good reason. Guitar isn't about measuring things, it's not a sport...there's no empirical scale to enable you to quantify what makes somebody "better", it's just music...it's art.


Well, the one is exception is if the lick is part of a song that he wants to get up to tempo. But I agree that coming back to it later might be the best approach. You hit a point of diminishing returns when you practice the same thing for months, and sometimes what you learn working on other licks is the missing piece that allows you to get the original lick up to speed.