#1
Hey Ive been trying to work on some jazz soloing, and Im using this backing track: http://datamusic.org/jazz-jam-tracks/38-street-outcome

These are the chords that the song uses, copied straight off of that website:

B7 E7 A7 D7

GMaj7 CMaj7 Bm7b5 E7

Am7 D7 GMaj7

C#m7b5 F#7 Bm7 E7 Am7 D7

B7 E7 A7 D7

GMaj7 CMaj7 Bm7b5 E7

Am7 D7 GMaj7 Em7

A7 Am7 D7 GMaj7


So my question: Is there a single scale I should use over this song? Or does it change throughout? I know that I should be focusing on specific notes over each individual chord, but I use the shapes and patterns of the scales I know to determine the type of lick I would normally use.

I know my pentatonic, major, minor, and some modes like dorian, phrygian, etc etc along my whole fretboard, so am I using one of these things? or is it changing throughout

Sorry if this is a noob question lol
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
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#3
Im asking for a reason. I was practicing and it seemed like the B-blues scale fit over the entire song but just the idea of a single scale over all of those different chords made me guess myself

And what theory did I say I know? all I mentioned was that I know my fretboard....
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Egnater Tweaker Combo
#4
I would suggest using all your modes over these chords, just try switching it up. A good technique is to switch between minor and major during your solo, depending on what chords are being played, if your chords are minor chords stay in the same key, just play from the minor position. And do the same for your major chords.
#5
Jazz soloists use chord tones. They generally do not think in scales because it (often) doesn't apply to their chord progressions.

So yeah, play the changes.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#6
its in the key of G....using alot of harmonic devices ... circle of 5ths and iim7..V7 / iii7 VI7 iim7 V7 progressions ... try using arpeggios over as many chords as you can mix them up for melodic relief 1-5-3-7...1-7-5-3 etc...i can hear some nice changes in those chords..

play well

wolf
#7
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Jazz soloists use chord tones. They generally do not think in scales because it (often) doesn't apply to their chord progressions.

So yeah, play the changes.


Eh, it depends. That pretty much held true until the '60s, when people began thinking in modal terms. It's best to use both.

TS, I'd first learn to solo over a jazz blues before you move on to harder things like this.