#1
Ok so here goes I know that the major scale is based on a W,W,H,W,W,W,H or Tone Tone Semitone, Tone,Tone,Tone, Semitone and lets say I want to perform a G Major Scale meaning the root not would be G which would be the 3rd fret of the low E string(6Th string) I understand the WWHWWWH thing so 2 frets(5th fret) then 2 frets(7th fret) and then 1 fret(8th fret) but thats just on the low E string, how do you play a wwhwwwh on the other strings starting from the root note. I know this sounds confusing
#3
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#4
delete the older one, I think this might have a better explanation of what I am asking, like I said I know the major scale starting from the low E with the W W H W W W H, but I am confused when crossing to the next strings like the A string
#5
For starters learn the pitch relationship between strings. For all pairs next to each other except the G and B strings, this is a perfect 4th (major 3rd for G and B). You'll come to recognise the shapes for a given interval across strings, so for example, starting from that G note, the second fret on the A string will be a major third (or two whole tones) away, the third fret a perfect forth (or two and a half whole tones) and so on.

Just as importantly, learn what the major scale sounds like, that way you'll know if you've hit a wrong note. Simply churning out scales from visual memory is not enough - you need to hear them.

Many people will tell you to memorise every note on the fretboard, but in my opinion doing that is not as important as learning the relationship between frets and strings. Not a bad thing to do, but not immediately necessary either.

Also, you're talking as if that particular G is the only G on the fretboard - but of course there are many others, and learning only one pattern from one note will not be enough.
Last edited by Beserker at Sep 11, 2009,
#7
Quote by Beserker

Many people will tell you to memorise every note on the fretboard, but in my opinion doing that is not as important as learning the relationship between frets and strings. Not a bad thing to do, but not immediately necessary either.


Man, reading around here I thought I was the only one who thought like that. Cool.

Anyway, OP, you might find it easier to learn scales on different keys by just moving the shapes around. It's I started doing that. Ex: for playing on the G key, play everything the shapes the same way you did in C, just 7 frets up. For F, just 5 frets. Got the way it moves?
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#8
It helps if you spell out the notes for an example.
Let's say you want to play C major.
Using the intervals you said, WWHWWWH gives us C D E F G A B C.
So, start on a C on the E string like the 8th fret, then find the comfortable positions of the rest of the notes through the scale. Do this for the whole fretboard and find the notes all over, and you should have a sound knowledge of the positions of the scale all over your guitar.