#1
Ok, so I joined one of my school's jazz bands, and I didn't know that all of their guitar music is in standard notation (no clue if that's the right name, just that it isn't tab). I can read music, because of my other instruments I play, but I've never learned how to read it for guitar. Any help? I need to at least get a start on it by monday, and the music only has a few parts that aren't just a rhythm with chord names over it. Also, is there any software that would convert it to tab? Thanks in advance,

Nick
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#2
Hmm that is a little weird, most the songs I got in jazz band had the chords on it and the parts that involved melody weren't very complicated or I was given the option to wing.

I can't help you much with reading notation but I will tell you for chords in jazz you need to break up the notes... Not quite sure if that makes sense...
#3
Best advice would be to just learn it, rather than convert it from tab or something.

Standard notation for guitar is nearly the same as standard notation for other instruments except that you always play the notes down one octave from what they really are, for example a middle C in the treble clef would be the C on the third fret of the A string, while the "real" middle C (fret one on the B string) is actually written one octave higher than middle C. Hope that gives you a reference point to start with, and if you haven't learned the note names on the guitar already, I highly suggest you do this, at least every note in open position and where they are on the treble clef!
#4
So if there was a middle D (on the clef) it would be a low D on the guitar?
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#5
guitar pro/power tab will do it.

Best way is to work it out yourself though - if you can read music for other instruments it shouldn't be hard to do. positioning so you can get the full range can be tricky and just akes practice/experience.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#6
Quote by doive
guitar pro/power tab will do it.

Best way is to work it out yourself though - if you can read music for other instruments it shouldn't be hard to do. positioning so you can get the full range can be tricky and just akes practice/experience.



This is your best bet. I would just use Guitar Pro.
#7
Is there a free download anywhere?
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#8
power tab is free everywhere - but seriously - if you say you can sight read that well, then do it your self - it'll be worth it in the end (i guess you'll have to do this more than once?)
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
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#9
The chords/rhythms should be easy for any guitar player, but I've had some trouble doing this. What I did is I just took some time and read the music and played it on guitar. No tabs or any simplified notation. After a while, you kind of get used to it and it becomes easier. Think of when you first started learning to read music for other instruments, was it easy at first? No. Did you get better? Yes.
#10
Quote by Nick The Lefty
Ok, so I joined one of my school's jazz bands, and I didn't know that all of their guitar music is in standard notation (no clue if that's the right name, just that it isn't tab). I can read music, because of my other instruments I play, but I've never learned how to read it for guitar. Any help? I need to at least get a start on it by monday, and the music only has a few parts that aren't just a rhythm with chord names over it. Also, is there any software that would convert it to tab? Thanks in advance,

Nick


Rather than converting to tab, I would suggest that you should just learn to read chord charts.... and how to play those chords.

it takes time, but you'll get it if you work on it. Part of the benefit of being in a school Jazz band is to gain this kind of experience.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Honestly I don't have the slightest clue about jazz, so it's gonna be tough. I can at least get the rhythm parts of the songs down (it's just quarter notes switching between 7th chords that are written above them) for now
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#13
Sure... Well the name is "Full House" by Dave Lalama and the other is "Little Brown Jug" by Joseph E. Winner. I can probably post pics of the lead sheet tonight
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#14
Ok, I'm just gonna learn it from the music since I need to learn anyways, but for the chords (Bb, Eb, Eo7, F7, etc) (that was the first 4 of full house) how do you know which ones to use if you're looking at chord charts? I used guitar chords 24/7 since they have a chord chart maker and I could just put all of the ones from each song on one and I wasn't sure how to pick which one to use. Is it safe to assume that unless there's parentheses and a number like in F7(6) that you play it on the lowest fret?
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#15
Quote by Nick The Lefty
Ok, I'm just gonna learn it from the music since I need to learn anyways, but for the chords (Bb, Eb, Eo7, F7, etc) (that was the first 4 of full house) how do you know which ones to use if you're looking at chord charts? I used guitar chords 24/7 since they have a chord chart maker and I could just put all of the ones from each song on one and I wasn't sure how to pick which one to use. Is it safe to assume that unless there's parentheses and a number like in F7(6) that you play it on the lowest fret?


You generally have quite alot of freedom pertaining to voicings. Try not to play too low of notes, as that can get in the way of the bassist. Often you want to think of your highest note as a melody, and then fill in the other voices to complete the chords.
#16
so really it doesn't matter as long as I'm not affecting the bassist?

*edit; I can't find some of the chords on the site, like Eo7 and Ab9, Gb9, Ao, and Go (the o's are like a degree sign) sorry i'm a complete noob at reading standard
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Last edited by Nick The Lefty at Sep 13, 2009,
#17
Quote by Nick The Lefty
so really it doesn't matter as long as I'm not affecting the bassist?


Coming from a bassist, all that matters is that you don't invade our range, and that you play the right notes, however you choose to voice them.


You should learn chord construction, rather than looking at charts to find out how to play a chord.
#18
I know, that's next on my list of things to do. Since I have to at least get a decent start on the music by tomorrow morning, I just wanted to get the chords so I can start on it. Since my band teacher is a really good jazz bassist/guitarist/sax player, I'm gonna see if I can get some lessons from him or something
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#19
Word of advice from someone who used to be in a Jazz Band.

Well, not perfect advice, you should be learning how to play the chords properly.

If you're given something to sightread, treat the extensions as optional. I.E. you don't need to play the 9th, 11th 13th etc... you don't actually need to play the 7th.

This only applies to sightreading though- and only if the voicing doesn't come into your head right away. You should really aim to be able to do it all fluently- so aim for that
#20
Quote by Nick The Lefty
so really it doesn't matter as long as I'm not affecting the bassist?

*edit; I can't find some of the chords on the site, like Eo7 and Ab9, Gb9, Ao, and Go (the o's are like a degree sign) sorry i'm a complete noob at reading standard

The o's mean diminished. So like Edim7, Adim7, etc.
#21
Ok, thanks again, and sorry, another noob theory question, what's the difference between a 7th and a 9th chord? Like a Bb7 and a Bb9
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#22
The ninth degree of the scale is just a second, but it is an octave higher than the bass note in the chord (first 7 scale degrees plus 2=9). A Bb9 is the same as a Bb7 chord, except it has the 9 added. Generally, when you see the chord name and then a 9 extension or 13 extension, it means the 7 in the chord is a b7 and not a maj7. Gah I can't think right now, I hope this makes sense, basically if the chord says Bbmaj9, you would play Bb D A C, you play a major seven because the chord is a maj9. But if you get a chord like Bb13 or Bb9, you would play Bb D Ab (C) (Eb) G.

To directly answer your question, you would play a Bb7 with the notes Bb D (F) Ab. Bb9 would be played Bb D (F) Ab C. You can leave out the fifth (F), but generally when you get 9 and 13 extensions you play the b7.

Last edited by st.stephen at Sep 15, 2009,
#23
As far as voicing is concerned, should I just pick the chords as they would fall in the key that the song is in? For example, one song is in Bb, and some of the chords are Bbm7, Fm7, Gbm7, and Eb7, so could I just pick the voicing for the Bbm7 first and then pick the one for the Fm7 and others so that they fall into the Bb scale? As in the Bbm7 would be the I, Eb7 would be IV, Fm7 the V, and Gbm7 the flat VI, and then voice them accordingly? Sorry if this doesn't make sense
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